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Picture of Night Procession (Signed)

Publisher's Description

Photographs by Stephen Gill
Words by Karl Ove Knausgård 

In March 2014, my family and I moved from east London to rural south Sweden where my partner Lena is from. I understood that these new surroundings would inform my work in very different ways and that nature would play a key role. I was looking forward to making work that did not feel restricted and suffocated by modern photographic technology nor would make an inaccurate projected impression of the natural landscape we had become part of. 

On my many walks, I soon came to realise that this new, apparently bleak, flat and open landscape was in fact teeming with intense life. Small clues appeared during daylight hours that helped me understand the extent of activity during the night. Clusters of feathers, animal footprints of all sizes showing regular overlapping routes, gnawed branches, eggshells, ant hills, nibbled mushrooms and busy snails and slugs working through the feast provided from the previous night

I started to imagine the creatures in absolute darkness on the forest floor driven by instincts and their will to survive. I imagined them encountering each other. I thought of their eyes – near redundant in the thick of the night – and their sense of smell and hearing finely tuned and heightened. 

Envisaging where this activity might unfold, coupled with a hopeful foresight, I placed cameras equipped with motion sensors, to trees, mostly at a low level, so that any movement triggered the camera shutter and an infra-red flash (which was outside the animals’ visual spectrum). 

The first results filled me with fascination and joy as they presented what felt like stepping off into another parallel and unearthly world.  The silent photographs also seemed to invent sounds. This frame of mind and way of working took me back to my first ever photo project at the age of 13, sitting in the bathroom window of my parents’ house in Bristol with a 10-metre cable release, attached to the camera, attempting to photograph garden birds.

As time went on I started to think, if I were a deer where would I drink from, or if an owl where would I prefer to perch, and positioned cameras in such places. I was already composing the rectangular view in my mind’s eye – even though the nocturnal animals were absent – imagining they were there.  Nature itself helped to decide the palette and the feel of the images as plant pigments were incorporated from the surrounding areas to make the final master prints.

I had grappled for many years with this idea of stepping back as the author of images to give space for chance and to encourage the subject to step forward. I had attempted this in various ways; for example, in 2005, by burying colour prints close to where they were made, as a collaboration, to entice the place itself to leave its physical mark on the images once they had been unearthed. Or, between 2009 - 2013, in the series Talking to Ants, I placed objects such as plant life, insects, seeds and dust from the place I was photographing inside the film chamber to create in-camera photograms creating a confusion of scale. Or, in 2012, in Best Before End, as a photographic response to the rise of high-energy drinks, I used the drinks themselves to part-process the film as they ate into the emulsion. These approaches added an element of uncertainty, without knowing exactly where the images would land, and relied on a point where intentions met chance with the hope that the subject itself could play a part, lead the way or become embedded in the finished images.

This time, though, it felt as if I was stepping out altogether, so that the subjects would orchestrate and perform and take on the role of author while at that moment I was likely to be sleeping. This was nature’s time to speak and let itself be felt and known. 

Stephen Gill

Cloth bound hardback
160 Pages
86 colour plates
218 mm x 270 mm
Book contains inserted 16 page saddle stitched booklet with words
170 mm x 240 mm
Publication date - September 2017
Published by Nobody

Stephen Gill

Publisher's Description

Photographs by Stephen Gill
Words by Karl Ove Knausgård 

In March 2014, my family and I moved from east London to rural south Sweden where my partner Lena is from. I understood that these new surroundings would inform my work in very different ways and that nature would play a key role. I was looking forward to making work that did not feel restricted and suffocated by modern photographic technology nor would make an inaccurate projected impression of the natural landscape we had become part of. 

On my many walks, I soon came to realise that this new, apparently bleak, flat and open landscape was in fact teeming with intense life. Small clues appeared during daylight hours that helped me understand the extent of activity during the night. Clusters of feathers, animal footprints of all sizes showing regular overlapping routes, gnawed branches, eggshells, ant hills, nibbled mushrooms and busy snails and slugs working through the feast provided from the previous night

I started to imagine the creatures in absolute darkness on the forest floor driven by instincts and their will to survive. I imagined them encountering each other. I thought of their eyes – near redundant in the thick of the night – and their sense of smell and hearing finely tuned and heightened. 

Envisaging where this activity might unfold, coupled with a hopeful foresight, I placed cameras equipped with motion sensors, to trees, mostly at a low level, so that any movement triggered the camera shutter and an infra-red flash (which was outside the animals’ visual spectrum). 

The first results filled me with fascination and joy as they presented what felt like stepping off into another parallel and unearthly world.  The silent photographs also seemed to invent sounds. This frame of mind and way of working took me back to my first ever photo project at the age of 13, sitting in the bathroom window of my parents’ house in Bristol with a 10-metre cable release, attached to the camera, attempting to photograph garden birds.

As time went on I started to think, if I were a deer where would I drink from, or if an owl where would I prefer to perch, and positioned cameras in such places. I was already composing the rectangular view in my mind’s eye – even though the nocturnal animals were absent – imagining they were there.  Nature itself helped to decide the palette and the feel of the images as plant pigments were incorporated from the surrounding areas to make the final master prints.

I had grappled for many years with this idea of stepping back as the author of images to give space for chance and to encourage the subject to step forward. I had attempted this in various ways; for example, in 2005, by burying colour prints close to where they were made, as a collaboration, to entice the place itself to leave its physical mark on the images once they had been unearthed. Or, between 2009 - 2013, in the series Talking to Ants, I placed objects such as plant life, insects, seeds and dust from the place I was photographing inside the film chamber to create in-camera photograms creating a confusion of scale. Or, in 2012, in Best Before End, as a photographic response to the rise of high-energy drinks, I used the drinks themselves to part-process the film as they ate into the emulsion. These approaches added an element of uncertainty, without knowing exactly where the images would land, and relied on a point where intentions met chance with the hope that the subject itself could play a part, lead the way or become embedded in the finished images.

This time, though, it felt as if I was stepping out altogether, so that the subjects would orchestrate and perform and take on the role of author while at that moment I was likely to be sleeping. This was nature’s time to speak and let itself be felt and known. 

Stephen Gill

Cloth bound hardback
160 Pages
86 colour plates
218 mm x 270 mm
Book contains inserted 16 page saddle stitched booklet with words
170 mm x 240 mm
Publication date - September 2017
Published by Nobody

£43.00

Picture of William Neill Photographer - A Retrospective

Available from October 2017 - taking advance orders

Overseas deliveries.  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

This retrospective book covering William Neill’s extensive career will feature images, many never published before, from his very early years with a camera in the 1970s through four decades including very recent work created in the past year. Photographs included are from his Antarctica series; an in-depth look at the “landscapes of the spirit” work; a Black and White portfolio; a series of patterns in nature imagery; and a portfolio of impressionistic, camera motion work; and last but not least, an extensive collection of Yosemite photographs. A true collector’s piece from this master of American Landscape Photography

WILLIAM NEILL

A resident of the Yosemite National Park area since 1977, William is a landscape photographer concerned with conveying the deep, spiritual beauty he sees and feels in Nature. Neill’s award-winning photography has been widely published in books, magazines, calendars, posters, and his limited-edition prints have been collected and exhibited in museums and galleries nationally, including the Museum of Fine Art Boston, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, The Vernon Collection, and The Polaroid Collection. Neill received a BA degree in Environmental Conservation at the University of Colorado. In 1995, Neill received the Sierra Club’s Ansel Adams Award for conservation photography.

Triplekite Publishing

Publication Date 15th October 2017

Format Hardback (295mm x 295mm)

Page extent 224

Illustrations 151


William Neill
A retrospective covering William Neill’s extensive career
£49.50

Picture of Beyond Drifting (Signed)

Publisher's Description

Beyond Drifting: Imperfectly Known Animals encapsulates in miniature the much larger environmental problems of an imperfect world. This work presents a unique collection of plankton specimens related to the pioneering discoveries made by naturalist JV Thompson in Cork Harbour during the 1800s. These recently found specimens are deceptive, however, and mysteriously conceal their true origin.

Plankton form a diverse group of microscopic marine organisms that are unable to swim against powerful ocean currents; they exist in a drifting, floating state, enveloped in the black deep.

As fragile as they are, current scientific research shows that plankton ingest microplastic particles, mistaking them for food. Plankton are a crucial source of food for larger creatures up the food chain – compounding the grave impact of plastics on marine life and, ultimately, humans. Plastic debris is now ubiquitous in the Anthropocene, the period since humanity has had a significant impact on our global environment, and today nearly all living creatures are affected by its widespread contamination.

The plankton specimens in this work are beautifully photographed objects of marine plastic debris, recovered from the same location as naturalist John Vaughan Thompson’s plankton samples from 200 years ago. Long-exposure photographs record movements of recovered plastic objects floating in a black void, captured on expired film and with faulty cameras. Film grain is intentionally visible, alluding to microplastic particles being ingested. Each specimen has a new scientific name reflecting early Latin origins and containing the word ‘plastic’ hidden within its title.

Designed by Mandy Barker + Tiffany Jones

TRADE EDITION Hardcover, 104 pages, 23 x 17.5 cm portrait
Section-sewn binding with book ribbon; interior tip-in; dust jacket; hand finishes
59 colour photographs + illustrations throughout
Published 1 May 2017 

Mandy Barker

Publisher's Description

Beyond Drifting: Imperfectly Known Animals encapsulates in miniature the much larger environmental problems of an imperfect world. This work presents a unique collection of plankton specimens related to the pioneering discoveries made by naturalist JV Thompson in Cork Harbour during the 1800s. These recently found specimens are deceptive, however, and mysteriously conceal their true origin.

Plankton form a diverse group of microscopic marine organisms that are unable to swim against powerful ocean currents; they exist in a drifting, floating state, enveloped in the black deep.

As fragile as they are, current scientific research shows that plankton ingest microplastic particles, mistaking them for food. Plankton are a crucial source of food for larger creatures up the food chain – compounding the grave impact of plastics on marine life and, ultimately, humans. Plastic debris is now ubiquitous in the Anthropocene, the period since humanity has had a significant impact on our global environment, and today nearly all living creatures are affected by its widespread contamination.

The plankton specimens in this work are beautifully photographed objects of marine plastic debris, recovered from the same location as naturalist John Vaughan Thompson’s plankton samples from 200 years ago. Long-exposure photographs record movements of recovered plastic objects floating in a black void, captured on expired film and with faulty cameras. Film grain is intentionally visible, alluding to microplastic particles being ingested. Each specimen has a new scientific name reflecting early Latin origins and containing the word ‘plastic’ hidden within its title.

Designed by Mandy Barker + Tiffany Jones

TRADE EDITION Hardcover, 104 pages, 23 x 17.5 cm portrait
Section-sewn binding with book ribbon; interior tip-in; dust jacket; hand finishes
59 colour photographs + illustrations throughout
Published 1 May 2017 

£35.00

Picture of A Wild Life: A Visual Biography of Photographer Michael Nichols

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

“Menaced by lizards in Indonesia, cuffed by a gorilla in Africa, stung by poisonous caterpillars in the world’s deepest cave”—so ran the lead to a 1985 article describing Michael “Nick” Nichols.

A Wild Life is Michael “Nick” Nichols’s story, told with passion and insight by author and photo-editor Melissa Harris. Nichols’ story combines a life of adventure, with a conviction about how we can redeem the human race by protecting our wildlife. The book’s two central characters are the photographer—who journeys from the American South, via the photographers’ co-operative Magnum, to becoming lead wildlife photographer of National Geographic magazine—and the author, who travels with the photographer on assignment in Africa, to gain intimate and deep insight into her subject. Harris’s story also draws on meetings with some of the world’s leading eco-scientists—including legendary primatologist, Jane Goodall.

Publisher: Aperture

Size: 7 1/2 x 10"

350 pages, 150 four-color and black-and-white image

Melissa Harris (Photographs by Michael Nichols)
A Wild Life is Michael “Nick” Nichols’s story, told with passion and insight by author and photo-editor Melissa Harris. Nichols’ story combines a life of adventure, with a conviction about how we can redeem the human race by protecting our wildlife.
£22.50

Picture of The Animals

Publisher's Description

“Giacomo Brunelli has been looking hard at animals. His focus is not on the framed and caged exotica of zoos but on the ordinary animals that remain with us to some extent: horses, dogs, cats, chickens, pigeons. He shows us a fox, looking sharply at the camera and poised to flee, and there are numerous birds, a snake and several toads, but this wildness is small and fragile, living in the familiar liminal space where manmade and natural meet and overlap. His animals inhabit farmyards, cobbled streets and the façades of stone buildings. There are no tigers here.

Brunelli’s animals are often composed only of suggestive fragments. His spare black and white images are attuned to the nuances of a moving mane, a silhouetted whisker, a highlighted, almost illuminated wing. He favours the profile and the counterintuitive angle, setting dark unobservable features against dark undiscernable backgrounds. A dead mouse, on its back, paws in air beside an oversized flower against a stark and distant mountain is no more or less frozen in time than is the growling dog, eyes alight and teeth forever bared; both are icons of states we fear but cannot know. These pictures are timeless and uncanny, powerful in their ordinariness, and emotionally much bigger than their simple subjects.”
Alison Nordström.


Publisher: Dewi Lewis

Size: 270 x 220 mm

72 pages, 41 tritone photographs

Giacomo Brunelli
Giacomo Brunelli’s first book, The Animals, was published by us in 2008 to great critical acclaim. After being out of print for several years a new edition is now available. It includes an additional eight images to the first edition.
£22.50

Picture of Summer in South Georgia (Signed)

Publisher's Description

A stunning photographic review of the unique landscape, wildlife and architecture of the remote sub-Antartic island of South Georgia.

Aberfeldy photographer Jamie Grant spent 50 days on the island capturing its unique landscape and architecture as chosen artist in residence for the South Georgia Heritage Trust (SGHT).

Jamie was the first photographer to be chosen as artist in residence by SGHT. While on location, he captured a rich selection of wildlife, landscape and architecture imagery to compile into a coffee table-style book.

South Georgia’s location between southern, cold Antarctic waters and warmer currents to the north make it a haven for wildlife. There are abundant bird populations, including albatrosses and King Penguins while huge breeding populations of seals occupy the beaches in the southern months and whales are increasingly spotted off the headlands. The island’s natural history is matched by a fascinating human heritage.

Numbered edition of 600 copies.

Sample images

Jamie Grant
A stunning photographic review of the unique landscape, wildlife and architecture of the remote sub-Antartic island of South Georgia.
£18.00

Picture of Hanon (Signed Copy)

Publisher's Description

Mizutani's new series, a follow up to his "Tokyo Parrots" series, through which he rapidly received recognition, captures great cormorants, which have exploded in population in the suburbs of Tokyo. Unlike his previous works, this series appears nearly monotone despite being shot in color. He has captured the urban landscape, which has become peculiar due to the presence of these birds, in very graphic compositions that transform the landscape into a two dimensional world without perspectival depth.

In Mizutani's images, flocks of great cormorants perched on the overhead power lines, which are a ubiquitous element of the Tokyo sky, become silhouettes that resemble musical notes on a score. In fact, the book of the series was titled HANON in reference to the French piano instruction book.

Sample images

Publisher : Amana inc.

Size : 360×258×8mm

68 pages

Yoshinori Mitzutani
Mizutani's new series, a follow up to his "Tokyo Parrots" series, through which he rapidly received recognition, captures great cormorants, which have exploded in population in the suburbs of Tokyo.
£50.00

Picture of Aves Mei

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Aves Mei is a photographic project by Italian artist Giorgia Valli. Created in the ‘World of Birds’ exhibit at the Bronx Zoo, each photograph depicts living birds perched in an environment of painted backdrops and synthetic foliage — a recreation of the birds’ natural habitats. These combinations of living creatures against dense layers of artifice result in a collection of striking and surreal images.

Opening with a text by the artist, excerpted below, Aves Mei presents 10 plates in an over-sized format, bound in dark green cloth and limited to 1,000 casebound copies. 

. . . After a period spent in the midst of thousands of sounds, my wish was to photograph silence. Wandering, I reached the Bronx Zoo, where I could walk around freely and photograph for hours. I needed to create friction among my emotions. Since childhood, I had always refused to visit zoos because they made me feel sad. But here, I experienced a sense of freedom that made me feel serene. I was suspended in a dimension between earth and heaven, where my only connection to reality was through simple and primitive sounds.

No sounds other than cries with which both people and birds make their way into the world; nothing more than simple syllables, such as ‘da-da’ or ‘ma-ma’. Shot after shot, the jingle of baby talk reached my ears. Whether in captivity or in liberty, the mysterious song of birds leaves an indelible trace which, like cages set into a wall, will eternally preserve the lives and voices of those who experience them.

Publisher: Nazraeli 

Size: 455 x 255 mm

32 pages, 10 four-colour plates.

Giorgia Valli
Aves Mei is a photographic project by Italian artist Giorgia Valli. Created in the ‘World of Birds’ exhibit at the Bronx Zoo, each photograph depicts living birds perched in an environment of painted backdrops and synthetic foliage — a recreation of the birds’ natural habitats.
£45.00

Picture of Fragile

Publisher's Description

‘The work in this book is an attempt to reconcile some of the conflicting aspects that are of interest to me in the landscape. The images here are an investigation into how the most fragile elements seem to have their very existence challenged and their vulnerability magnified when set against the strength and solidity of their surroundings’.

Valda Bailey is a freelance photographer living in Sussex who first became passionate about photography when she was 14. Her approach to photography is greatly informed by her background in painting and her influences come as much from artists as photographers. She is largely motivated by colour and form and the tension and dynamism that these components can bring to an image.

Her objectives are to portray an interpretation of a scene rather than a literal representation. She makes her images using camera movement and multiple exposure – two techniques which help to create abstract shapes and blur extraneous detail.

She has spent time in New York under the expert tutelage of noted street photographer, Jay Maisel and has been greatly influenced by his teaching about light, colour and gesture.

Her work has been featured in broadsheet newspapers, national and international publications and she has recently been invited to teach for Light & Land Photographic Workshops run by Charlie Waite. She has exhibited most recently in London and last summer was the first woman to be invited to join six other photographers to exhibit at the biennial Masters of Vision in Southwell.

She has images in private collections worldwide and her work has been purchased by notable members of the art and photographic community.

Publisher: Triplekite

Size: 240 x 240 mm

48 pages, 25 plates

Valda Bailey
‘The work in this book is an attempt to reconcile some of the conflicting aspects that are of interest to me in the landscape.'
£18.50

Picture of Closer

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Tomasz Gudzowaty became established as a wildlife documentary photographer in 1999, when he won the first of his World Press Photo awards in the nature category with a remarkable image of two cheetah cubs just about to take down their first prey. He has since traveled extensively through- out sub-Saharan Africa, amassing thousands of images of elephants, lions, cheetahs, wildebeest, zebras and other species. In 2008 Gudzowaty documented a remote emperor penguin colony in the Weddell Sea, a project he continued through his work on South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

Gudzowaty’s wildlife photography is characterized by a technical and aesthetic sophistication that is particularly visible in his depictions of large-scale natural spectacles, such as the annual wildebeest migration in Tanzania or the breeding season on the penguin rookeries. This book captures Gudzowaty’s passion and deep knowledge of his subject: keenly observing both general patterns and minute details, he brings the viewer closer to nature’s inner workings and beauty.

Publisher: Steidl

Size: 290 x 370 mm

256 pages, 250 images

Tomasz Gudzowaty
Gudzowaty’s wildlife photography is characterized by a technical and aesthetic sophistication that is particularly visible in his depictions of large-scale natural spectacles, such as the annual wildebeest migration in Tanzania or the breeding season on the penguin rookeries.
£70.20

Picture of World in One Cubic Foot, A

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Twelve inches by twelve inches by twelve inches, the cubic foot is a relatively tiny unit of measure compared to the whole world. With every step, we disturb and move through cubic foot after cubic foot. But behold the cubic foot in nature—from coral reefs to cloud forests to tidal pools—even in that finite space you can see the multitude of creatures that make up a vibrant ecosystem.

For A World in One Cubic Foot, esteemed nature photographer David Liittschwager took a bright green metal cube—measuring precisely one cubic foot—and set it in various ecosystems around the world, from Costa Rica to Central Park. Working with local scientists, he measured what moved through that small space in a period of twenty-four hours. He then photographed the cube’s setting and the plant, animal, and insect life inside it—anything visible to the naked eye. The result is a stunning portrait of the amazing diversity that can be found in ecosystems around the globe. Many organisms captured in Liittschwager’s photographs have rarely, if ever, been presented in their full splendor to the general reader, and the singular beauty of these images evocatively conveys the richness of life around us and the essential need for its conservation. The breathtaking images are accompanied by equally engaging essays that speak to both the landscapes and the worlds contained within them, from distinguished contributors such as Elizabeth Kolbert and Alan Huffman, in addition to an introduction by E. O. Wilson. After encountering this book, you will never look at the tiniest sliver of your own backyard or neighborhood park the same way; instead, you will be stunned by the unexpected variety of species found in an area so small.

A World in One Cubic Foot puts the world accessibly in our hands and allows us to behold the magic of an ecosystem in miniature. Liittschwager’s awe-inspiring photographs take us to places both familiar and exotic and instill new awareness of the life that abounds all around.

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Size: 12 x 12"

224 pages, 985 color plates

David Liittschwager
For A World in One Cubic Foot, esteemed nature photographer David Liittschwager took a bright green metal cube—measuring precisely one cubic foot—and set it in various ecosystems around the world, from Costa Rica to Central Park.
£28.35

Picture of John Shaw’s Guide to Digital Nature Photography

Publisher's Description

For over four decades, John Shaw’s authentic voice and trusted advice has helped photographers achieve impressive shots in the great outdoors. In his first-ever book on digital photography, Shaw provides in-depth advice on everything from equipment and lenses to thorough coverage of digital topics including how to use the histogram. In addition, he offers inspirational and frank insight that goes far beyond the nuts and bolts of photography, explaining that successful photos come from having a vision, practicing, and then acquiring the equipment needed to accomplish the intention. Easily digestible and useful for every type of photographer, and complete with more than 250 jaw-dropping images, John Shaw’s Guide to Digital Nature Photography is the one book you’ll need to beautifully capture the world around you.

Publisher: Amphoto Books

Size: 7 1/2 x 9 1/2"

240 Pages

John Shaw
Photography legend John Shaw returns with his much-anticipated guide to digital nature photography, complete with more than 250 extraordinarily beautiful photographs.
£15.29

Picture of Earth is my Witness

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is an exceptionally heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at three times our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Over the course of his thirty-year career, award-winning photographer ART WOLFE has worked on every continent and in hundreds of locations. His stunning images interpret and record the world’s fastest disappearing wildlife, landscapes, and native cultures and are a lasting inspiration to those who seek to preserve them all. Wolfe’s photographs are recognized throughout the world for their mastery of color, composition, and perspective, and his photographic mission is multifaceted: art, wildlife advocacy, and journalism all inform his work.

Advanced printing process: The printing of this book utilizes a revolutionary new color reproduction technique called Chroma Centric™, which is eight times more precise than standard offset printing. To meet the demands of high-density printing, this process uses stochastic screening and specially formulated inks, enhancing the color gamut by more than 25 percent. With this technique, Insight Editions is creating perhaps the most stunning color photography book of its kind.

Publisher: Insight Editions

Size: 11 x 14"

356 pages

Art Wolfe
Wolfe’s photographs are recognized throughout the world for their mastery of color, composition, and perspective, and his photographic mission is multifaceted: art, wildlife advocacy, and journalism all inform his work.
£58.50

Picture of Oldest Living Things in the World

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates

Publisher's Description

The Oldest Living Things in the World is an epic journey through time and space. Over the past decade, artist Rachel Sussman has researched, worked with biologists, and traveled the world to photograph continuously living organisms that are 2,000 years old and older. Spanning from Antarctica to Greenland, the Mojave Desert to the Australian Outback, the result is a stunning and unique visual collection of ancient organisms unlike anything that has been created in the arts or sciences before, insightfully and accessibly narrated by Sussman along the way.

Her work is both timeless and timely, and spans disciplines, continents, and millennia. It is underscored by an innate environmentalism and driven by Sussman’s relentless curiosity. She begins at “year zero,” and looks back from there, photographing the past in the present. These ancient individuals live on every continent and range from Greenlandic lichens that grow only one centimeter a century, to unique desert shrubs in Africa and South America, a predatory fungus in Oregon, Caribbean brain coral, to an 80,000-year-old colony of aspen in Utah. Sussman journeyed to Antarctica to photograph 5,500-year-old moss; Australia for stromatolites, primeval organisms tied to the oxygenation of the planet and the beginnings of life on Earth; and to Tasmania to capture a 43,600-year-old self-propagating shrub that’s the last individual of its kind. Her portraits reveal the living history of our planet—and what we stand to lose in the future. These ancient survivors have weathered millennia in some of the world’s most extreme environments, yet climate change and human encroachment have put many of them in danger. Two of her subjects have already met with untimely deaths by human hands.

Alongside the photographs, Sussman relays fascinating – and sometimes harrowing – tales of her global adventures tracking down her subjects and shares insights from the scientists who research them. The oldest living things in the world are a record and celebration of the past, a call to action in the present, and a barometer of our future.

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Size: 11 1/2 x 10

304 pages, 124 color plates, 4 infographics

Rachel Sussman
Over the past decade, artist Rachel Sussman has researched, worked with biologists, and traveled the world to photograph continuously living organisms that are 2,000 years old and older.
£28.35

Picture of Flora

Publisher's Description

When the British Photographer Nick Knight, known to all for his portrait and advertising photography, discovered the collection of pressed flowers in the British Natural History Museum in London, he was so thrilled that he dedicated himself totally to this subject. In his second book he collects fifty of his most beautiful photographs of plant specimens. The pictures emanate a breathtaking beauty and elegance previously unseen in the history of photography.

See here for a presentation on Flora.

Publisher: Schirmer/Mosel

Size: 235 x 365 mm

80 pages, 46 colour plates

Nick Knight
When the British Photographer Nick Knight, known to all for his portrait and advertising photography, discovered the collection of pressed flowers in the British Natural History Museum in London, he was so thrilled that he dedicated himself totally to this subject.
£38.95

Picture of Across the Ravaged Land

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Across the Ravaged Land is the third and final volume in Nick Brandt’s trilogy of books documenting the disappearing animals of eastern Africa. The book offers a darker vision of this world, still filled with a stunning beauty but now tragically tainted and fast disappearing at the hands of man.
In addition to a range of starkly powerful animal portraits, Brandt introduces some new themes, as humans make an appearance for the first time. He also contributes two essays summing up his photographic odyssey, which has taken more than a decade of intensive work to complete.

See Brandt’s site for images.

Publisher: Abrams

Size: 15 x 13"

120 pages

Nick Brandt
The third and final volume in Nick Brandt’s trilogy of books documenting the disappearing animals of eastern Africa.
£36.00

Picture of Earth to Sky: Among Africa’s Elephants, a Species in Crisis

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Michael “Nick” Nichols, longtime photographer for National Geographic as well as the magazine’s editor-at-large for photography, has been working with African elephants for more than twenty years. In Earth to Sky he tells their story through poignant images that bring us directly into their habitats—lush forests and open savannas, or stark landscapes ravaged by human intervention—to observe the animals’ daily engagements and activities. Nichols’s photographs are accompanied here by the words of such celebrated figures in the field of conservation as Iain Douglas-Hamilton, J. Michael Fay, Peter Matthiessen, Cynthia Moss, and David Quammen. In addition, Nichols engages us in his photographic journey with personal and informative introductions to each of the book’s four chapters—exploring life in the wild, the ivory trade, family interactions, and programs for orphaned elephants. In Earth to Sky Nichols demonstrates that the world needs elephants, and insists that we do all we can to protect their spaces and their lives. Sadly, most signs point to a tragic conclusion for these wise and emotionally complex creatures. This book is an urgent call for us to bring that process to a halt, while we still can.

Publisher: Aperture

Size: 11¾ x 8 3⁄8"

188 pages (plus 2 gatefold pages)

Michael Nichols
Michael “Nick” Nichols, longtime photographer for National Geographic as well as the magazine’s editor-at-large for photography, has been working with African elephants for more than twenty years.
£26.96

Picture of One Picture Book #77: birds have wings

Publisher's Description

Having difficulty identifying a particular species of bird through her spotting scope, Carol E. Richards took a photograph through the lens to assist with her research. The resulting picture turned out to be far more than a tool for verification. It had a mood and visual content the artist was drawn to, and led to the creation of a series of beautiful, dream-like vignettes. “Unlike some photographs of wildlife that are clear and provide answers,” says Richards, “these soft visuals raise questions. It was a surprising discovery; as I spied on these birds, I could see their charm and individuality. Who knew?”

Publisher: Nazraeli Press

Size:5 1/2 x 7 1/4"

16 pages, 12 four-color plates, 1 original photograph.

Carol E. Richards
One Picture Book featuring a series of beautiful, dream-like vignettes of birds as seen through the photographers spotting scope.
£36.00

Picture of New Art of Photographing Nature

Publisher's Description

A new spin on the classic guide to composing stunning images of nature and wildlife

What is the difference between a good picture and a great one? In this fully revised edition of the classic bestseller The Art of Photographing Nature, master photographer Art Wolfe and former Audubon photo editor Martha Hill team up to explain the art of composing images of enduring beauty. Against a backdrop of more than 250 photographs of nature, wildlife, and landscapes, they share insights and advice about what works and what doesn’t, and how small changes can take an image from ordinary to extraordinary. Throughout, all-new tips from digital imaging expert Tim Grey show readers how to make the most of digital technology, whether by choosing the right color space, understanding sensor size, or removing distracting elements in post-processing. The result is an invaluable collection of expert advice updated for the modern age.

Publisher: Amphoto

224 pages

Art Wolfe & Martha Hill
In this fully revised edition of the classic bestseller The Art of Photographing Nature, master photographer Art Wolfe and former Audubon photo editor Martha Hill team up to explain the art of composing images of enduring beauty.
£17.99

Picture of In the Realm of Nature

Publisher's Description

Known for his exquisite images of birds and landscape, Eliot Porter (American, 1901–1990) was a pioneer in the use of color photography. His work also became a powerful visual argument for environmental conservation. Trained as a medical doctor and possessing a scientist’s gift for close observation, Porter explored new ways of depicting nature, building blinds in trees so he could study his avian subjects at closer vantage and producing landscape images that capture both pristine forest and ragged river canyons with equal force and brilliance.

Initially encouraged by the groundbreaking photographers Ansel Adams and Alfred Stieglitz, Porter went on to produce a body of work all his own. His 1962 Sierra Club book In Wildness Is the Preservation of the World, with its images grouped by season and accompanied by quotations from Henry David Thoreau, transformed the concept of nature photography books. Ultimately, Porter’s photographs came to the attention of Congress and led to the passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964, the foundational law in wilderness management today.

Eliot Porter: In the Realm of Nature contains 110 images from the collections of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser at the Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas, and of the J. Paul Getty Museum, along with an essay by Paul Martineau that discusses Porter’s life and the innovations he brought to the practice of photography.

Publisher: J. Paul Getty Museum

Size: 9 1/2 x 11"

144 pages, 80 colour and 30 b/w illustrations

Publisher's price: £27.95

Eliot Porter
Eliot Porter: In the Realm of Nature contains 110 images from the collections of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser at the Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas, and of the J. Paul Getty Museum.
£25.15

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