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Picture of Photography and Japan
Publisher's Description
What defines Japanese photography? Is there a distinctive Japanese photographic aesthetic? In Photography and Japan, Karen M. Fraser argues that the diversity of styles, subjects and functions of Japanese photography precludes easy categorization along nationalized lines. Rather, the development of photography within Japan is best understood by examining its close relationship with the country’s dramatic history.

This book traces 150 years of photography, a period during which Japan has experienced some of the most significant events in modern history: a remarkable transformation from an isolated, feudal country into an industrialized, modern world power during the late nineteenth century, an equally striking rise and fall as an imperial power during the ?rst half of the twentieth century, and a miraculous economic recovery in the decades following the utter devastation of World War Two. The history of photography has paralleled these events, becoming inextricably linked with notions of modernity and cultural change from the time it first arrived in the mid-nineteenth century.

The author considers this intertwined history by tracing the intersection of photog­raphy and social history, focusing on the role of the camera in documenting key cultural and political events and in exploring social responses to cultural change. Thematic chapters that focus on photography’s role in negotiating cultural identity, war photog­raphy and the documentation of urban life introduce many photographs that will be unfamiliar to Western viewers, and provide a broadened cultural context for more well-known images.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
192 pages, 100 illustrations, 70 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
Karen M. Fraser
Publisher's Description
What defines Japanese photography? Is there a distinctive Japanese photographic aesthetic? In Photography and Japan, Karen M. Fraser argues that the diversity of styles, subjects and functions of Japanese photography precludes easy categorization along nationalized lines. Rather, the development of photography within Japan is best understood by examining its close relationship with the country’s dramatic history.

This book traces 150 years of photography, a period during which Japan has experienced some of the most significant events in modern history: a remarkable transformation from an isolated, feudal country into an industrialized, modern world power during the late nineteenth century, an equally striking rise and fall as an imperial power during the ?rst half of the twentieth century, and a miraculous economic recovery in the decades following the utter devastation of World War Two. The history of photography has paralleled these events, becoming inextricably linked with notions of modernity and cultural change from the time it first arrived in the mid-nineteenth century.

The author considers this intertwined history by tracing the intersection of photog­raphy and social history, focusing on the role of the camera in documenting key cultural and political events and in exploring social responses to cultural change. Thematic chapters that focus on photography’s role in negotiating cultural identity, war photog­raphy and the documentation of urban life introduce many photographs that will be unfamiliar to Western viewers, and provide a broadened cultural context for more well-known images.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
192 pages, 100 illustrations, 70 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
£16.16

Picture of Photography and Anthropology
Publisher's Description
Photography and anthropology share strikingly parallel histories. Christopher Pinney's provocative and eminently readable account provides a polemical narrative of anthropologists' use of photography from the 1840s to the present.

Walter Benjamin suggested that photography 'make[s] the difference between technology and magic visible as a thoroughly historical variable,' and Pinney here explores photography as a divinatory practice. Though viewed as modern and rational, this quality of photography in fact propelled anthropologists towards the 'primitive' lives of those they studied.

Early anthropology celebrated photography as a physical record, whose authority and permanence promised an escape from the lack of certainty in speech. For later anthropologists, this same quality became grounds to critique an imaging practice that failed to capture movement and process. But throughout these twists and turns, anthropology as a practice of 'being there' has found itself entwined in an intimate engagement with photography as metaphor for the collection of evidence.

Photography and Anthropology reveals how anthropology provides the tools to re-imagine the power and magic of all photographic practices. It presents both a history of anthropology's seduction by photography and the anthropological theory of photography. This thoroughly researched book draws upon an intimate knowledge of the history of anthropology, photography and the world's major anthropological practitioners.

‘A masterful synthesis of his twenty years of explorations into the parallel histories of anthropology and photography, Chris Pinney’s intellectual archeologies of image, observation, and evidence are at once deeply historical, deeply contemporary, deeply critical, and deeply provocative. I can’t imagine a more vivid blow-up of how the photographic magic of realism mirrors and shadows the anthropological realism of magic.’ – Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, The University of New Mexico

'Who better than Chris Pinney to adjudicate the magic of photography with the anthropology of the image, and do so in such a marvelously succinct, smart, and lively manner? With its cornucopia of wondrous accounts of how photography is set to work outside of Western culture, this book mightily expands both the meaning of the image and the power of a photograph. A tour de force.' – Michael Taussig, Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University and author of Mimesis and Alterity and What Color is the Sacred?

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
192 pages, 80 illustrations, 40 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
Christopher Pinney
Publisher's Description
Photography and anthropology share strikingly parallel histories. Christopher Pinney's provocative and eminently readable account provides a polemical narrative of anthropologists' use of photography from the 1840s to the present.

Walter Benjamin suggested that photography 'make[s] the difference between technology and magic visible as a thoroughly historical variable,' and Pinney here explores photography as a divinatory practice. Though viewed as modern and rational, this quality of photography in fact propelled anthropologists towards the 'primitive' lives of those they studied.

Early anthropology celebrated photography as a physical record, whose authority and permanence promised an escape from the lack of certainty in speech. For later anthropologists, this same quality became grounds to critique an imaging practice that failed to capture movement and process. But throughout these twists and turns, anthropology as a practice of 'being there' has found itself entwined in an intimate engagement with photography as metaphor for the collection of evidence.

Photography and Anthropology reveals how anthropology provides the tools to re-imagine the power and magic of all photographic practices. It presents both a history of anthropology's seduction by photography and the anthropological theory of photography. This thoroughly researched book draws upon an intimate knowledge of the history of anthropology, photography and the world's major anthropological practitioners.

‘A masterful synthesis of his twenty years of explorations into the parallel histories of anthropology and photography, Chris Pinney’s intellectual archeologies of image, observation, and evidence are at once deeply historical, deeply contemporary, deeply critical, and deeply provocative. I can’t imagine a more vivid blow-up of how the photographic magic of realism mirrors and shadows the anthropological realism of magic.’ – Steven Feld, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Music, The University of New Mexico

'Who better than Chris Pinney to adjudicate the magic of photography with the anthropology of the image, and do so in such a marvelously succinct, smart, and lively manner? With its cornucopia of wondrous accounts of how photography is set to work outside of Western culture, this book mightily expands both the meaning of the image and the power of a photograph. A tour de force.' – Michael Taussig, Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University and author of Mimesis and Alterity and What Color is the Sacred?

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
192 pages, 80 illustrations, 40 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
£16.16

Picture of Photography and Death
Publisher's Description
The idea of photographing the dead is as old as photography itself. For the most part, early death photographs were commissioned or taken by relatives of the deceased and preserved in the home as part of the family photograph collection. Once thought inappropriate and macabre, today these photographs are considered beneficial in dealing with bereavement.

Photography and Death reveals the beauty, meaning and significance of images once dismissed as disturbing, perverted or grotesque by placing them within the context of changing cultural attitudes towards death and loss. Excluding images of death through war, violence or natural disasters, Audrey Linkman concentrates on photographs of natural death within the family. She identifies the range of death-related photographs that were produced in both Europe and North America, and charts changes in their stylistic treatment through the decades. The author also examines how this subject is handled by contemporary art photographers.

Photography and Death will interest photographic, art and social historians as well as practitioners in the field of bereavement therapy, or those who seek to analyse the images of long-lost ancestors who gaze back from the pages of their family photograph albums.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
160 pages, 90 illustrations, 40 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
Audrey Linkman
Publisher's Description
The idea of photographing the dead is as old as photography itself. For the most part, early death photographs were commissioned or taken by relatives of the deceased and preserved in the home as part of the family photograph collection. Once thought inappropriate and macabre, today these photographs are considered beneficial in dealing with bereavement.

Photography and Death reveals the beauty, meaning and significance of images once dismissed as disturbing, perverted or grotesque by placing them within the context of changing cultural attitudes towards death and loss. Excluding images of death through war, violence or natural disasters, Audrey Linkman concentrates on photographs of natural death within the family. She identifies the range of death-related photographs that were produced in both Europe and North America, and charts changes in their stylistic treatment through the decades. The author also examines how this subject is handled by contemporary art photographers.

Photography and Death will interest photographic, art and social historians as well as practitioners in the field of bereavement therapy, or those who seek to analyse the images of long-lost ancestors who gaze back from the pages of their family photograph albums.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
160 pages, 90 illustrations, 40 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
£16.16

Picture of After Photography
Publisher's Description
After Photography examines the myriad ways in which the digital revolution has fundamentally altered the way we receive visual information, from photos of news events taken by ordinary people on mobile phones to the widespread use of image surveillance. In a world beset by critical problems and ambiguous boundaries, Fred Ritchin argues that it is time to explore the possibilities created by digital innovations and to use them to understand our rapidly changing world.

Ritchin investigates the future of visual media as the digital revolution transforms images into a hypertextual medium, fundamentally changing the way we conceptualise the world. Simultaneously, the increased manipulation of photographs makes photography suspect as reliable documentation. In the tradition of John Berger and Susan Sontag, Ritchin analyses photography’s failings and reveals untapped potentials for the medium.

'The forecasting of possibilities for digital media takes the book beyond dry academia and into a fund of ideas and inspiration for any photographer.' Black and White Photography

Publisher: W. W. Norton
Size: 153 x 210 mm
200 pages, 50 four-colour illustrations

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
Fred Ritchin
Publisher's Description
After Photography examines the myriad ways in which the digital revolution has fundamentally altered the way we receive visual information, from photos of news events taken by ordinary people on mobile phones to the widespread use of image surveillance. In a world beset by critical problems and ambiguous boundaries, Fred Ritchin argues that it is time to explore the possibilities created by digital innovations and to use them to understand our rapidly changing world.

Ritchin investigates the future of visual media as the digital revolution transforms images into a hypertextual medium, fundamentally changing the way we conceptualise the world. Simultaneously, the increased manipulation of photographs makes photography suspect as reliable documentation. In the tradition of John Berger and Susan Sontag, Ritchin analyses photography’s failings and reveals untapped potentials for the medium.

'The forecasting of possibilities for digital media takes the book beyond dry academia and into a fund of ideas and inspiration for any photographer.' Black and White Photography

Publisher: W. W. Norton
Size: 153 x 210 mm
200 pages, 50 four-colour illustrations

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
£14.99

Picture of Visual Currencies - Reflections on Native Photography
Publisher's Description
Visual Currencies in an edited collection of essays coming out of sessions held at the Native American Art Studies Association Conference, Phoenix, 2005. The seven contributors focus on the far-reaching influences of photography on Native American communities, and the possibilities that it currently presents. The essays present issues at the root of contemporary photographic practice, within and beyond Native American and First Nations communities, exploring the values, or currencies, attributed to to photographs by practitioners and institutions. John Tagg has memorably described the history of photography as that of an insistent practice, and this aptly and vividly conveys the legacy of Native American and First Nations photography in its varied perspectives presented by the authors and contemporary photographers who have contributed to this edited volume. By focusing on institutional repositories and contemporary photographic practice, Visual Currencies invites reflection into the 'material turn'; specifically addressing the significance of early photographs and the impact of digital media, the relationship between artistic practice and archival resources, the enactment of sovereignty and the performance of memory, operating at an individual and communal level.

Publisher: NMS Enterprises Ltd
Size: 245 x 188 mm
128 pages 40 colour and 20 b/w photographs

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
Edited by Henrietta Lidchi & Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie
Publisher's Description
Visual Currencies in an edited collection of essays coming out of sessions held at the Native American Art Studies Association Conference, Phoenix, 2005. The seven contributors focus on the far-reaching influences of photography on Native American communities, and the possibilities that it currently presents. The essays present issues at the root of contemporary photographic practice, within and beyond Native American and First Nations communities, exploring the values, or currencies, attributed to to photographs by practitioners and institutions. John Tagg has memorably described the history of photography as that of an insistent practice, and this aptly and vividly conveys the legacy of Native American and First Nations photography in its varied perspectives presented by the authors and contemporary photographers who have contributed to this edited volume. By focusing on institutional repositories and contemporary photographic practice, Visual Currencies invites reflection into the 'material turn'; specifically addressing the significance of early photographs and the impact of digital media, the relationship between artistic practice and archival resources, the enactment of sovereignty and the performance of memory, operating at an individual and communal level.

Publisher: NMS Enterprises Ltd
Size: 245 x 188 mm
128 pages 40 colour and 20 b/w photographs

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
£19.99

Picture of Photography Degree Zero - Reflections on Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida
Publisher's Description
Roland Barthes's 1980 book Camera Lucida is perhaps the most influential book ever published on photography. The terms studium and punctum, coined by Barthes for two different ways of responding to photographs, are part of the standard lexicon for discussions of photography; Barthes's understanding of photographic time and the relationship he forges between photography and death have been invoked countless times in photographic discourse; and the current interest in vernacular photographs and the ubiquity of subjective, even novelistic, ways of writing about photography both owe something to Barthes. Photography Degree Zero, the first anthology of writings on Camera Lucida, goes beyond the usual critical orthodoxies to offer a range of perspectives on Barthes's important book.

Photography Degree Zero (the title links Barthes's first book, Writing Degree Zero, to his last, Camera Lucida) includes essays written soon after Barthes's book appeared as well as more recent rereadings of it, some previously unpublished. The contributors' approaches range from psychoanalytical (in an essay drawing on the work of Lacan) to Buddhist (in an essay that compares the photographic flash to the mystic's light of revelation); they include a history of Barthes's writings on photography and an account of Camera Lucida and its reception; two views of the book through the lens of race; and a provocative essay by Michael Fried and two responses to it.

The variety of perspectives included in Photography Degree Zero, and the focus on Camera Lucida in the context of photography rather than literature or philosophy, serve to reopen a vital conversation on Barthes's influential work.

Publisher: MIT Press
Size: 22.9 x 19 x 2.3 cm
320 pages, 5 duotones

Publisher's Price: £22.95
Edited by Geoffrey Batchen
Publisher's Description
Roland Barthes's 1980 book Camera Lucida is perhaps the most influential book ever published on photography. The terms studium and punctum, coined by Barthes for two different ways of responding to photographs, are part of the standard lexicon for discussions of photography; Barthes's understanding of photographic time and the relationship he forges between photography and death have been invoked countless times in photographic discourse; and the current interest in vernacular photographs and the ubiquity of subjective, even novelistic, ways of writing about photography both owe something to Barthes. Photography Degree Zero, the first anthology of writings on Camera Lucida, goes beyond the usual critical orthodoxies to offer a range of perspectives on Barthes's important book.

Photography Degree Zero (the title links Barthes's first book, Writing Degree Zero, to his last, Camera Lucida) includes essays written soon after Barthes's book appeared as well as more recent rereadings of it, some previously unpublished. The contributors' approaches range from psychoanalytical (in an essay drawing on the work of Lacan) to Buddhist (in an essay that compares the photographic flash to the mystic's light of revelation); they include a history of Barthes's writings on photography and an account of Camera Lucida and its reception; two views of the book through the lens of race; and a provocative essay by Michael Fried and two responses to it.

The variety of perspectives included in Photography Degree Zero, and the focus on Camera Lucida in the context of photography rather than literature or philosophy, serve to reopen a vital conversation on Barthes's influential work.

Publisher: MIT Press
Size: 22.9 x 19 x 2.3 cm
320 pages, 5 duotones

Publisher's Price: £22.95
£20.66

Picture of Polo Bound for Passaic
Publisher's Description
This publication focuses on the photographic work of Steffi Klenz and includes discussions of four main bodies of work; A Scape, Nonsuch, Nummianus and La Posa. The publication creates a critical platform for discussions about ideas of architecture and contemporary photography, generating a theoretical as well as visual engagement with our current urban fabric. The book accompanies the exhibition Nummianus, which takes place at The New Art Gallery Walsall from 11 September – 22 November 2009 and at Street Level Photoworks from 30 January – 27 March 2010.

Publisher: New Art Gallery Walsall
Size: 340 x 210 mm
108 pages, 52 duotones

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
Steffi Klenz
Publisher's Description
This publication focuses on the photographic work of Steffi Klenz and includes discussions of four main bodies of work; A Scape, Nonsuch, Nummianus and La Posa. The publication creates a critical platform for discussions about ideas of architecture and contemporary photography, generating a theoretical as well as visual engagement with our current urban fabric. The book accompanies the exhibition Nummianus, which takes place at The New Art Gallery Walsall from 11 September – 22 November 2009 and at Street Level Photoworks from 30 January – 27 March 2010.

Publisher: New Art Gallery Walsall
Size: 340 x 210 mm
108 pages, 52 duotones

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
£20.00

Picture of Single Exposures 2
Publisher's Description
Over 160 topics 1-page observations in a quick-read format Compiled from the best of Brooks Jensen's almost-daily podcasts on photography.

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
189 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
Brooks Jensen
Publisher's Description
Over 160 topics 1-page observations in a quick-read format Compiled from the best of Brooks Jensen's almost-daily podcasts on photography.

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
189 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
£11.66

Picture of On Being a Photographer

Publisher's Description
“A photographer might forget his camera and live to tell the tale. But no photographer who survives has ever forgotten the lessons in this book. It is not just essential reading, it’s compulsory.” Daniel Meadows Head of Photojournalism, Center for Journalism Studies University of Wales “I read On Being a Photographer in one sitting. This is an invaluable book for its historical and aesthetic references as well as David’s words, which go to the heart of every committed photographer - from the heart of a great photographer. It is inspiring.” Frank Hoy, Associate Professor, Visual Journalism The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Telecommunication Arizona State University

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
145 pages

David Hurn & Bill Jay

Publisher's Description
“A photographer might forget his camera and live to tell the tale. But no photographer who survives has ever forgotten the lessons in this book. It is not just essential reading, it’s compulsory.” Daniel Meadows Head of Photojournalism, Center for Journalism Studies University of Wales “I read On Being a Photographer in one sitting. This is an invaluable book for its historical and aesthetic references as well as David’s words, which go to the heart of every committed photographer - from the heart of a great photographer. It is inspiring.” Frank Hoy, Associate Professor, Visual Journalism The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Telecommunication Arizona State University

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
145 pages

£14.95

Picture of Photograph as Contemporary Art (Second edition)

Publisher's Description
From conceptual art’s use of the banal and ‘artless’ snapshot to the carefully constructed tableaux of Jeff Wall, this book considers the full range of ways that today’s artists engage with photography to make art.

Some artists, such as Sophie Calle and Erwin Wurm, use photography as a record of performances or everyday actions, while others like Yinka Shonibare and Gregory Crewdson stage invented scenes to tell fictional stories. Andreas Gursky, Thomas Demand and Rineke Dijkstra present a cool, seemingly objective view of the world, while Nan Goldin and Wolfgang Tillmans offer up intimate details of their private lives. For Luc Delahaye and Allan Sekula, photography is a means of creating documentary, while for Cindy Sherman and Gillian Wearing, the photograph becomes a repository of personal, social and cultural values in an image-saturated world.

This new edition brings the story of contemporary art photography up to date with a new chapter on artists who emphasize the physical and material properties of photography, who use photography as just one component in their pan-media practice, or who experiment with new modes of dissemination.

Featuring established artists such as Isa Genzken and Sherrie Levine alongside a younger generation including Florian Maier-Aichen, Anne Collier and Walead Beshty, The Photograph as Contemporary Art points to the durability, diversity and energy of art photography in the twenty-first century.

Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Size: 210 x 150 mm
248 pages, 243 Illustrations, 207 in colour

Usually dispatched within 2 working days

Charlotte Cotton

Publisher's Description
From conceptual art’s use of the banal and ‘artless’ snapshot to the carefully constructed tableaux of Jeff Wall, this book considers the full range of ways that today’s artists engage with photography to make art.

Some artists, such as Sophie Calle and Erwin Wurm, use photography as a record of performances or everyday actions, while others like Yinka Shonibare and Gregory Crewdson stage invented scenes to tell fictional stories. Andreas Gursky, Thomas Demand and Rineke Dijkstra present a cool, seemingly objective view of the world, while Nan Goldin and Wolfgang Tillmans offer up intimate details of their private lives. For Luc Delahaye and Allan Sekula, photography is a means of creating documentary, while for Cindy Sherman and Gillian Wearing, the photograph becomes a repository of personal, social and cultural values in an image-saturated world.

This new edition brings the story of contemporary art photography up to date with a new chapter on artists who emphasize the physical and material properties of photography, who use photography as just one component in their pan-media practice, or who experiment with new modes of dissemination.

Featuring established artists such as Isa Genzken and Sherrie Levine alongside a younger generation including Florian Maier-Aichen, Anne Collier and Walead Beshty, The Photograph as Contemporary Art points to the durability, diversity and energy of art photography in the twenty-first century.

Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Size: 210 x 150 mm
248 pages, 243 Illustrations, 207 in colour

Usually dispatched within 2 working days

£9.95

Picture of Photography - A Critical Introduction (4th Edition)
Publisher's Description
Photography: A Critical Introduction was the first introductory textbook to examine key debates in photographic theory and place them in their social and political contexts, and is now established as one of the leading textbooks in its field. Written especially for students in further and higher education and for introductory college courses, this fully revised edition provides a coherent introduction to the nature of photographic seeing.

This revised and updated fourth edition includes:
  • Key concepts, biographies of major thinkers, seminal references
  • A full glossary of terms, comprehensive bibliography and new chapter abstracts
  • Updated resource information, including guides to public archives and useful websites
Individual chapters cover:
  • Key debates in photographic theory and history
  • Documentary photography and photojournalism
  • Personal and popular photography
  • Photography and commodity culture
  • Photography and the human body
  • Photography as art
  • Photography in the age of electronic imaging
This lavishly illustrated fourth edition includes over one hundred photographs and images, of huge diversity, in full colour throughout, featuring work from Bill Brandt, Susan Derges, Rineke Dijkstra, Lee Friedlander, Fran Herbello, Hannah Höch, Karen Knorr, Dorothea Lange, Chrystal Lebas, Lee Miller, Martin Parr, Ingrid Pollard, Jacob Riis, Alexander Rodchenko, Andres Serrano and Jeff Wall.

Publisher: Routledge
Size: 246 x 189 mm
416 pages, 103 black + white photographs

Usually dispatched within 2 working days
Edited by Liz Wells
Publisher's Description
Photography: A Critical Introduction was the first introductory textbook to examine key debates in photographic theory and place them in their social and political contexts, and is now established as one of the leading textbooks in its field. Written especially for students in further and higher education and for introductory college courses, this fully revised edition provides a coherent introduction to the nature of photographic seeing.

This revised and updated fourth edition includes:
  • Key concepts, biographies of major thinkers, seminal references
  • A full glossary of terms, comprehensive bibliography and new chapter abstracts
  • Updated resource information, including guides to public archives and useful websites
Individual chapters cover:
  • Key debates in photographic theory and history
  • Documentary photography and photojournalism
  • Personal and popular photography
  • Photography and commodity culture
  • Photography and the human body
  • Photography as art
  • Photography in the age of electronic imaging
This lavishly illustrated fourth edition includes over one hundred photographs and images, of huge diversity, in full colour throughout, featuring work from Bill Brandt, Susan Derges, Rineke Dijkstra, Lee Friedlander, Fran Herbello, Hannah Höch, Karen Knorr, Dorothea Lange, Chrystal Lebas, Lee Miller, Martin Parr, Ingrid Pollard, Jacob Riis, Alexander Rodchenko, Andres Serrano and Jeff Wall.

Publisher: Routledge
Size: 246 x 189 mm
416 pages, 103 black + white photographs

Usually dispatched within 2 working days
£22.49

Picture of Education of a Photographer
Publisher's Description
In a world where there are millions and millions of images made and produced everyday, it is imperative that students of photography step back to analyze and understand what they are doing, what came before, what strategies were used, and how photographers think and work.

With their new book The Education of a Photographer, co-editors Charles H. Traub, Adam B. Bell and Steve Heller intend to bring inspiration and insight to everyone who engages or is interested in lens-based media. It offers 51 essays and interviews by a talented group of industry renowned photographers, teachers, and thinkers. From the early twentieth-century masters to the postmoderns and on to today’s incisive visionaries, this thought-provoking book will navigate the reader through the varied landscape of photography, eloquently expressing what it means to be a photographer today.

Co-editor Steven Heller says, “the authors and interviewees were selected for their reputations and experience, and the writings were chosen for how effectively they could educate even the knowledgeable.” The diverse group of writers and photographers include: Berenice Abbott, Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Wendell Berry, Elizabeth Biondi, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alexey Brodovitch, Harry Callahan, Sarah Charlesworth, Charlotte Cotton, Gregory Crewdson, Yolanda Cuomo, Tim Davis, Rachael Dunville, Dave Eggers, Vilém Flusser, Stephen Frailey, Lee Friedlander, Peter Galassi, Helen Gee, Luigi Ghirri, Ralph Hattersley, Daile Kaplan, William Klein , Max Kozloff, Ken Light, Vera Lutter, Nathan Lyons, Peter MacGill, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Susan Meiselas, Lisette Model, László Moholy-Nagy, Vik Muniz, Cynthia Oznick, Brian Palmer, Irving Penn, Robert Pledge, Kerry William Purcell, Alexander Rodchenko, Leo Rubinfien, Shelley Rice, Stephen Shore, Aaron Siskind, Clarissa Sligh, Larry Sultan, Mary Virginia Swanson, John Szarkowski, Gael Towey, Penelope Umbrico, Jeff Wall, Randy West , Minor White, Garry Winogrand.

Photographer Harry Callahan says in his interview with co-editor Charles Traub, “ I still don’t think you can teach anyone to be creative. All you can do is give them an environment.” Teaching photographer Gregory Crewdson adds that, “one of the great things about photography is that it’s a conduit to almost everything. Photographs are a currency of our culture and that, unlike other mediums in art...photography is accessible and democratic in a way that the other forms of art aren’t. It’s really important to understand not only the tradition of art photography and that history, but it’s also equally important to understand how photographs exist in our culture, and understand how art photographs relate or do not relate to other forms of popular culture like advertising, fashion, and film.”

Co-editor Adam B. Bell sums it up best saying that, “The Education of a Photographer offers advice and a few signposts for the photographer who is beginning this journey, but the real education of any photographer lies in taking the risks, pursuing one’s passions, looking and, above all, making the work.”

Publisher: Allworth Press
Size: 228 x 153mm
256 pages

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
Editted by Charles H. Traub & Steven Heller
Publisher's Description
In a world where there are millions and millions of images made and produced everyday, it is imperative that students of photography step back to analyze and understand what they are doing, what came before, what strategies were used, and how photographers think and work.

With their new book The Education of a Photographer, co-editors Charles H. Traub, Adam B. Bell and Steve Heller intend to bring inspiration and insight to everyone who engages or is interested in lens-based media. It offers 51 essays and interviews by a talented group of industry renowned photographers, teachers, and thinkers. From the early twentieth-century masters to the postmoderns and on to today’s incisive visionaries, this thought-provoking book will navigate the reader through the varied landscape of photography, eloquently expressing what it means to be a photographer today.

Co-editor Steven Heller says, “the authors and interviewees were selected for their reputations and experience, and the writings were chosen for how effectively they could educate even the knowledgeable.” The diverse group of writers and photographers include: Berenice Abbott, Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Wendell Berry, Elizabeth Biondi, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alexey Brodovitch, Harry Callahan, Sarah Charlesworth, Charlotte Cotton, Gregory Crewdson, Yolanda Cuomo, Tim Davis, Rachael Dunville, Dave Eggers, Vilém Flusser, Stephen Frailey, Lee Friedlander, Peter Galassi, Helen Gee, Luigi Ghirri, Ralph Hattersley, Daile Kaplan, William Klein , Max Kozloff, Ken Light, Vera Lutter, Nathan Lyons, Peter MacGill, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Susan Meiselas, Lisette Model, László Moholy-Nagy, Vik Muniz, Cynthia Oznick, Brian Palmer, Irving Penn, Robert Pledge, Kerry William Purcell, Alexander Rodchenko, Leo Rubinfien, Shelley Rice, Stephen Shore, Aaron Siskind, Clarissa Sligh, Larry Sultan, Mary Virginia Swanson, John Szarkowski, Gael Towey, Penelope Umbrico, Jeff Wall, Randy West , Minor White, Garry Winogrand.

Photographer Harry Callahan says in his interview with co-editor Charles Traub, “ I still don’t think you can teach anyone to be creative. All you can do is give them an environment.” Teaching photographer Gregory Crewdson adds that, “one of the great things about photography is that it’s a conduit to almost everything. Photographs are a currency of our culture and that, unlike other mediums in art...photography is accessible and democratic in a way that the other forms of art aren’t. It’s really important to understand not only the tradition of art photography and that history, but it’s also equally important to understand how photographs exist in our culture, and understand how art photographs relate or do not relate to other forms of popular culture like advertising, fashion, and film.”

Co-editor Adam B. Bell sums it up best saying that, “The Education of a Photographer offers advice and a few signposts for the photographer who is beginning this journey, but the real education of any photographer lies in taking the risks, pursuing one’s passions, looking and, above all, making the work.”

Publisher: Allworth Press
Size: 228 x 153mm
256 pages

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
£12.99

Picture of Along Some Rivers - Photographs and Conversations
Publisher's Description
Robert Adams, one of America’s foremost living photographers, has spent decades considering and documenting the landscape of the American West and how it has been altered, disturbed, or destroyed by the hand of man. A professor of English before turning to photography, Adams is also a skilled writer and acute thinker on aesthetic questions. Aperture’s previous collections, Beauty in Photography and Why People Photograph, gathered together Adams’s essays on a host of subjects: writing, teaching, photography’s place in the arts, and reflections on the work of an array of photographers. With its focus on the voice of the artist, Along Some Rivers follows in the tradition of these publications, but provides another point of entry into Robert Adams’s careful consideration of photography and beyond. A collection of conversations (some previously unpublished) with writers and curators—William McEwan, Constance Sullivan, and Thomas Weski, among others (including a group of his students)—this publication offers the artist’s thoughts on a number of his now legendary projects, including Cottonwoods and What We Bought. A discussion of his recent series chronicling the destruction of Oregon’s great forests, Turning Back, takes us to the present moment. Through these exchanges we learn which filmmakers and painters have influenced his work; why, in Adams’s view, Marcel Duchamp has not been a helpful guide for art; how he decides upon titles for his books; and what the term documentary means to him; as well as basic technical questions—which cameras he prefers, how he approaches printing his pictures. Additionally, this publication includes a selection of twenty-eight unpublished landscapes. Together these photographs and conversations provide valuable insight into how this master photographer approaches the medium with an expert level of craft, great intelligence, modesty, and above all, a distinct sense of purpose. Along Some Rivers will be a valuable addition to literature on photography.

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 140 x 210mm
96 pages, 28 illustrations

Usually dispatched within 2 working days
Robert Adams
Publisher's Description
Robert Adams, one of America’s foremost living photographers, has spent decades considering and documenting the landscape of the American West and how it has been altered, disturbed, or destroyed by the hand of man. A professor of English before turning to photography, Adams is also a skilled writer and acute thinker on aesthetic questions. Aperture’s previous collections, Beauty in Photography and Why People Photograph, gathered together Adams’s essays on a host of subjects: writing, teaching, photography’s place in the arts, and reflections on the work of an array of photographers. With its focus on the voice of the artist, Along Some Rivers follows in the tradition of these publications, but provides another point of entry into Robert Adams’s careful consideration of photography and beyond. A collection of conversations (some previously unpublished) with writers and curators—William McEwan, Constance Sullivan, and Thomas Weski, among others (including a group of his students)—this publication offers the artist’s thoughts on a number of his now legendary projects, including Cottonwoods and What We Bought. A discussion of his recent series chronicling the destruction of Oregon’s great forests, Turning Back, takes us to the present moment. Through these exchanges we learn which filmmakers and painters have influenced his work; why, in Adams’s view, Marcel Duchamp has not been a helpful guide for art; how he decides upon titles for his books; and what the term documentary means to him; as well as basic technical questions—which cameras he prefers, how he approaches printing his pictures. Additionally, this publication includes a selection of twenty-eight unpublished landscapes. Together these photographs and conversations provide valuable insight into how this master photographer approaches the medium with an expert level of craft, great intelligence, modesty, and above all, a distinct sense of purpose. Along Some Rivers will be a valuable addition to literature on photography.

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 140 x 210mm
96 pages, 28 illustrations

Usually dispatched within 2 working days
£13.95

Picture of Letting Go of the Camera

28 Essays on Photography and the Creative Life

Publisher's description

Photography is, or can be, a way of life. Beyond cameras and equipment, beyond film and chemistry, beyond pixels and technology lie the mysteries of the creative life shared by those who strive to communicate and express themselves clearly. This book is an exploration of the path of creative photography.

Including:

  • A Change of Venue
  • Ambition, Age & Art
  • Beyond What It Is
  • Creativity and Confusion
  • Finishing
  • How to Make a Workshop Work
  • Image & Idea
  • Lessons from Joni Mitchell
  • Letting Go of the Camera
  • One Hundred Prints Project
  • Project Work versus Greatest Hits
  • The Importance of Partnering
  • The Importance of Structure
  • The Matter with Subject Matter
  • Twenty Years to Break the Rules
  • What is Your Natural Vision
  • What It Means To Be An Artist
  • When It Becomes a Project
  • Windows and Artifacts
And More

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher: Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ X 7 ½'
192 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
Brooks Jensen
28 Essays on Photography and the Creative Life
£11.66

Picture of Single Exposures - Random Observations on Photography Photography, Art & Creativity
Publisher's Description
Over 155 topics 1-page observations in a quick-read format

Compiled from the best of the LensWork Commentaries on CD and Brooks’ almost-daily audio podcast on photography.

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher: Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'.
192 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
Brooks Jensen
Publisher's Description
Over 155 topics 1-page observations in a quick-read format

Compiled from the best of the LensWork Commentaries on CD and Brooks’ almost-daily audio podcast on photography.

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher: Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'.
192 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
£11.66

Picture of Mind's Eye

Due to reprint Jan 2014

Publisher's Description
Henri Cartier-Bresson's indelible writings on photography and photographers have been published sporadically over the past forty-five years. His essays – several of which have never before been translated into English – are collected here for the first time. The Mind’s Eye features Cartier-Bresson's famous text on 'the decisive moment' as well as his observations on Moscow, Cuba, and China during turbulent times. These essays ring with the same immediacy and visual intensity that characterize his photography.

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 210mm
112 pages

Usually dispatched within 10 working days

Henri Cartier-Bresson

Due to reprint Jan 2014

Publisher's Description
Henri Cartier-Bresson's indelible writings on photography and photographers have been published sporadically over the past forty-five years. His essays – several of which have never before been translated into English – are collected here for the first time. The Mind’s Eye features Cartier-Bresson's famous text on 'the decisive moment' as well as his observations on Moscow, Cuba, and China during turbulent times. These essays ring with the same immediacy and visual intensity that characterize his photography.

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 210mm
112 pages

Usually dispatched within 10 working days

£12.50

Picture of Why People Photograph

A wonderfully thought-provoking collection of essays by one of the most influential living photographers.

Publisher's Description
'At our best and most fortunate we make pictures because of what stands in front of the camera, to honor what is greater and more interesting than we are.' Robert Adams

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 139 x 210mm
192 pages, 32 black-and-white photographs


Robert Adams

A wonderfully thought-provoking collection of essays by one of the most influential living photographers.

Publisher's Description
'At our best and most fortunate we make pictures because of what stands in front of the camera, to honor what is greater and more interesting than we are.' Robert Adams

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 139 x 210mm
192 pages, 32 black-and-white photographs


£8.99

Picture of Ongoing Moment

Publisher's Description
In his last book, 'Yoga for people who can't be bothered to do it', Geoff Dyer confessed that not only did he not take pictures in the course of his travels but that he did not own a camera. With characteristic perversity - and trademark originality - 'The Ongoing Moment' is an idiosyncratic history of photography. Seeking to identify their signature styles Dyer looks at the ways that canonical figures such as Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Kert sz, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus and William Eggleston have photographed the same things (benches, hats, hands, roads). In doing so he constructs a narrative in which the same photographers - many of whom never met in their lives - constantly come into contact with each other. Great photographs change the way we see the world; 'The Ongoing Moment' changes the way we look at both. It is the most ambitious example to date of a form of writing that Dyer has made his own - the non-fiction work of art.

'His odd and illuminating book may yet take its place among the classic work on the medium' - OBSERVER

'One of the most graceful ruminations on photography ever ... Dyer's tour de force is as inspirational as it is accessible' - SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

'Dyer's subtle, understated, unforgettable masterpiece deserves to join Susan Sontag's On Photography on our bookshelves' - SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY

Publisher: Canongate
400 pages

12.9 x 0.1 x 0.8 cm

Usually dispatched within 2 working days

Geoff Dyer

Publisher's Description
In his last book, 'Yoga for people who can't be bothered to do it', Geoff Dyer confessed that not only did he not take pictures in the course of his travels but that he did not own a camera. With characteristic perversity - and trademark originality - 'The Ongoing Moment' is an idiosyncratic history of photography. Seeking to identify their signature styles Dyer looks at the ways that canonical figures such as Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Kert sz, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus and William Eggleston have photographed the same things (benches, hats, hands, roads). In doing so he constructs a narrative in which the same photographers - many of whom never met in their lives - constantly come into contact with each other. Great photographs change the way we see the world; 'The Ongoing Moment' changes the way we look at both. It is the most ambitious example to date of a form of writing that Dyer has made his own - the non-fiction work of art.

'His odd and illuminating book may yet take its place among the classic work on the medium' - OBSERVER

'One of the most graceful ruminations on photography ever ... Dyer's tour de force is as inspirational as it is accessible' - SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

'Dyer's subtle, understated, unforgettable masterpiece deserves to join Susan Sontag's On Photography on our bookshelves' - SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY

Publisher: Canongate
400 pages

12.9 x 0.1 x 0.8 cm

Usually dispatched within 2 working days

£11.69

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