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Picture of Faking It: Manipulated Photography before Photoshop

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Named a best book of 2012—Modern Art Notes

“[O]ne of the most interesting, liveliest art history books I’ve read this year.”—Tyler Green, Modern Art Notes podcast 

Photographic manipulation is a familiar phenomenon in the digital era. What will come as a revelation to readers of this captivating, wide-ranging book is that nearly every type of manipulation we associate with Adobe’s now-ubiquitous Photoshop software was also part of photography’s predigital repertoire, from slimming waistlines and smoothing away wrinkles to adding people to (or removing them from) pictures, not to mention fabricating events that never took place. Indeed, the desire and determination to modify the camera image are as old as photography itself—only the methods have changed.

By tracing the history of manipulated photography from the earliest days of the medium to the release of Photoshop 1.0 in 1990, Mia Fineman offers a corrective to the dominant narrative of photography’s development, in which champions of photographic “purity,” such as Paul Strand, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson, get all the glory, while devotees of manipulation, including Henry Peach Robinson, Edward Steichen, and John Heartfield, are treated as conspicuous anomalies. Among the techniques discussed on these pages—abundantly illustrated with works from an international array of public and private collections—are multiple exposure, combination printing, photomontage, composite portraiture, over-painting, hand coloring, and retouching. The resulting images are as diverse in style and motivation as they are in technique. Taking her argument beyond fine art into the realms of politics, journalism, fashion, entertainment, and advertising, Fineman demonstrates that the old adage “the camera does not lie” is one of photography’s great fictions.

Publisher: Yale University Press

Size:  9 1/2 x 10 1/2"

288 pages, 276 color & black & white illustations

Mia Fineman
By tracing the history of manipulated photography from the earliest days of the medium to the release of Photoshop 1.0 in 1990, Mia Fineman offers a corrective to the dominant narrative of photography’s development
£36.00

Picture of On Writing with Photography

Publisher's Description

From James Agee to W. G. Sebald, there has been an explosion of modern documentary narratives and fiction combining text and photography in complex and fascinating ways. However, these contemporary experiments are part of a tradition that stretches back to the early years of photography. Writers have been integrating photographs into their work for as long as photographs have existed, producing rich, multilayered creations; and photographers have always made images that incorporate, respond to, or function as writing. On Writing with Photography explores what happens to texts—and images—when they are brought together.

From the mid-nineteenth century to the present, this collection addresses a wide range of genres and media, including graphic novels, children’s books, photo-essays, films, diaries, newspapers, and art installations. Examining the works of Herman Melville, Don DeLillo, Claude McKay, Man Ray, Dare Wright, Guy Debord, Zhang Ailing, and Roland Barthes, among others, the essays trace the relationship between photographs and “reality” and describe the imaginary worlds constructed by both, discussing how this production can turn into testimony of personal and collective history, memory and trauma, gender and sexuality, and ethnicity.

Together, these essays help explain how writers and photographers—past and present—have served as powerful creative resources for each other.

Contributors: Stuart Burrows, Brown U; Roderick Coover, Temple U; Adrian Daub, Stanford U; Marcy J. Dinius, DePaul U; Marianne Hirsch, Columbia U; Daniel H. Magilow, U of Tennessee, Knoxville; Janine Mileaf; Tyrus Miller, U of California, Santa Cruz; Leah Rosenberg, U of Florida; Xiaojue Wang, U of Pennsylvania.

Publisher: University of Minnesota Press

Size: 5 1/2 x 8 1/2"

368 pages, 74 black & white photographs

Karen Beckman and Liliane Weissberg (Editors)
An exploration of the relationship between photography and text, from the age of early photography to the contemporary graphic novel
£18.45

Picture of Perspective in the age of digital photography

Publisher's Description

When you take a photograph, you flatten the world. This remarkable process is called perspective. In a clear, non-technical way, this book provides an introduction to perspective through looking at photographs. It covers practical issues such as what happens when photographs are joined together, and why photographs still look realistic when viewed obliquely. This is a book for anyone interested in perception, photography or geometry.

Publisher: Badsey Publications

Size: 210 x 148 mm 

64 pages with more than 60 photographs, most in full colour.

Richard Phillips
In a clear, non-technical way, this book provides an introduction to perspective through looking at photographs. It covers practical issues such as what happens when photographs are joined together, and why photographs still look realistic when viewed obliquely.
£5.40

Picture of Naturalistic Photography

Publisher's Description

P H Emerson’s Naturalistic Photography is one of the classics of photographic literature. This newly-designed and typeset, 600-page edition includes the complete text of the definitive 1899 edition which includes additional essays by Emerson, among them the controversial Photography - Not Art. Written by "one of the most important book-makers amongst ninetheenth-century art photographers" it provides a unique insight into both photographic processes and photographic concerns during this formative period in the history of photography. 
Compared at the time to “dropping a bombshell at a tea party”,Naturalistic Photography marked the start of a crusade against academism in artistic photography and the beginning of the long transition into modernism.
Emerson has been called “the Martin Luther of photography” (John Szarkowski), and more recently “one of the most virulent polemicists in the history of photography” (Thomas Galifot, Musée d’Orsay). His fierce and trenchant writing is in sharp contrast to the gentle, atmospheric images of his pioneering photobooks such as Life and Landscape on the Norfolk Broads and what many regard as his masterpiece, Marsh Leaves (1895), "one of the most beautiful books about isolation and solitude, perhaps death, ever made" (Martin Parr & Gerry Badger, The Photobook: A History).

Emerson’s texts are today recognised as ranking alongside those of John Berger, Roland Barthes and John Szarkowski, as the precursors to contemporary thinking on photography.
This edition includes all the images from the original
Publisher: MuseumsEtc
Size: 203 x 127 mm

604 pages
P H Emerson

Publisher's Description

P H Emerson’s Naturalistic Photography is one of the classics of photographic literature. This newly-designed and typeset, 600-page edition includes the complete text of the definitive 1899 edition which includes additional essays by Emerson, among them the controversial Photography - Not Art. Written by "one of the most important book-makers amongst ninetheenth-century art photographers" it provides a unique insight into both photographic processes and photographic concerns during this formative period in the history of photography. 
Compared at the time to “dropping a bombshell at a tea party”,Naturalistic Photography marked the start of a crusade against academism in artistic photography and the beginning of the long transition into modernism.
Emerson has been called “the Martin Luther of photography” (John Szarkowski), and more recently “one of the most virulent polemicists in the history of photography” (Thomas Galifot, Musée d’Orsay). His fierce and trenchant writing is in sharp contrast to the gentle, atmospheric images of his pioneering photobooks such as Life and Landscape on the Norfolk Broads and what many regard as his masterpiece, Marsh Leaves (1895), "one of the most beautiful books about isolation and solitude, perhaps death, ever made" (Martin Parr & Gerry Badger, The Photobook: A History).

Emerson’s texts are today recognised as ranking alongside those of John Berger, Roland Barthes and John Szarkowski, as the precursors to contemporary thinking on photography.
This edition includes all the images from the original
Publisher: MuseumsEtc
Size: 203 x 127 mm

604 pages
£44.96

Picture of Photography and the Artist's Book

Publisher's Description

There is a renewed interest in the relationship of photography and the artist’s book, both as a work of art and as an alternative means of exhibition and dissemination. There is also a notable expansion in the activities of self-publication by photographers and artists who use the photograph. 
Furthermore, the theorising of the photographic essay, and notions of "conceptual documentary", have become important areas of discourse for practitioners and theorists alike who are interested in working with the photograph in book form. This important new publication provides a broad international perspective, bringing together writers from Australia, Germany, Ireland, the UK and the USA - both leading theorists and leading practitioners - to more fully explore the issues raised by the relationship of photography with the artist’s book. 
Among the artists whose work is explored are Francesca Woodman, Fiona Tan, Tacita Dean, Adam Murray/Preston is my Paris, and many more. The work of many of the artists discussed is also illustrated.

Publisher: MuseumsEtc
Size: 203 x 127 mm
350 pages
Theresa Wilkie, Jonathan Carson, Rosie Miller (Editors)
This important new publication provides a broad international perspective, bringing together writers from Australia, Germany, Ireland, the UK and the USA - both leading theorists and leading practitioners - to more fully explore the issues raised by the relationship of photography with the artist’s book.
£31.46

Picture of Photographs Not Taken:  A Collection Of Photographers Essays

Publisher's Description

The Photographs Not Taken is a collection of essays by photographers about the times they didn’t use their camera. I have asked the photographers to abandon the conventional tools needed to make a photograph, and, instead, make one using words to describe the memories and experiences that didn’t go through the camera lens. Here, the process of making a photograph has been reversed. Instead of looking out into the world through a camera lens, these essays allow us to look directly into the photographer’s mind and eye and focus on where the photographs come from in their barest and most primitive form. These mental negatives depict the unedited world and the moments of life that do not exist in a single frame.

The Photographs Not Taken features contributions by: Dave Anderson, Timothy Archibald, Roger Ballen, Thomas Bangsted, Juliana Beasley, Nina Berman, Elinor Carucci, Kelli Connell, Paul D'Amato, Tim Davis, KayLynn Deveney, Doug Dubois, Rian Dundon, Amy Elkins, Jim Goldberg, Emmet Gowin, Gregory Halpern, Tim Hetherington, Todd Hido, Rob Hornstra, Eirik Johnson, Chris Jordan, Nadav Kander, Ed Kashi, Misty Keasler, Lisa Kereszi, Erika Larsen, Shane Lavalette, Deana Lawson, Joshua Lutz, David Maisel, Mary Ellen Mark, Laura McPhee, Michael Meads, Andrew Moore, Richard Mosse, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Laurel Nakadate, Ed Panar, Christian Patterson, Andrew Phelps, Sylvia Plachy, Mark Power, Peter Riesett, Simon Roberts, Joseph Rodriguez, Stefan Ruiz, Matt Salacuse, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Aaron Schuman, Jamel Shabazz, Alec Soth, Amy Stein, Mark Steinmetz, Joni Sternbach, Hank Willis Thomas, Brian Ulrich, Peter Van Agtmael, Massimo Vitali, Hiroshi Watanabe, Alex Webb, and Rebecca Norris Webb.

Publisher: Daylight

Size: 5 ½ x 8"

232 pages

Edited by Will Steacy
The Photographs Not Taken is a collection of essays by photographers about the times they didn’t use their camera.
£11.50
£11.25

Picture of Photography Changes Everything

Publisher's Description

Photography Changes Everything—drawn from the online Smithsonian Photography Initiative—offers a provocative rethinking of photography’s impact on our culture and our lives. It is a reader-friendly exploration of the many ways photographs package information and values, demand and hold attention, and shape our knowledge of and experience in the world.

At this transitional moment in visual culture, Photography Changes Everything provides a unique opportunity to better understand the history, practice, and power of photography. The publication harnesses the extraordinary visual assets of the Smithsonian Institution’s museums, science centers, and archives to trigger an unprecedented and interdisciplinary dialogue about how photography does more than record the world—it shapes and changes every aspect of our experience of it.

The book features over three hundred images and nearly one hundred engaging short texts commissioned from experts, writers, inventors, public figures, and everyday folk—Hugh Hefner, John Baldessari, John Waters, Robert Adams, Sandra Phillips, and others. Each story responds to images selected by project contributors. Together they engage readers in a timely exploration of the extent to which our lives have been transformed through our interactions with photographic imagery.


Publisher: Aperture

Size: 10" x 7"

356 pages, approx. 250 four-color images

Edited by Marvin Heiferman
A reader-friendly exploration of the many ways photographs package information and values, demand and hold attention, and shape our knowledge of and experience in the world.
£22.50

Picture of Francesca Woodman: the Roman Years between Flesh and Film

Francesca Woodman (1958 1981) was an American photographer best known for her black and white pictures featuring herself and female models. Many of her photographs show young nude women, blurred by camera movement and long exposure times, merging with their surroundings, or with their faces obscured. Her work continues to be the subject of much attention, years after she committed suicide at the age of 22. This book focuses on Woodman's late 1970s Roman sojourn, reproducing a selection of her letters and writings from that time, as well as exploring the influence that the classics, in art as well as in literature, had upon her work. It also includes a number of pictures taken by her friends that portray the photographer herself, as well as ancillary visual material. This is an intense and intimate portrayal of Francesca Woodman's universe.

Francesca Woodman

Francesca Woodman (1958 1981) was an American photographer best known for her black and white pictures featuring herself and female models. Many of her photographs show young nude women, blurred by camera movement and long exposure times, merging with their surroundings, or with their faces obscured. Her work continues to be the subject of much attention, years after she committed suicide at the age of 22. This book focuses on Woodman's late 1970s Roman sojourn, reproducing a selection of her letters and writings from that time, as well as exploring the influence that the classics, in art as well as in literature, had upon her work. It also includes a number of pictures taken by her friends that portray the photographer herself, as well as ancillary visual material. This is an intense and intimate portrayal of Francesca Woodman's universe.

£13.41

Picture of Texts

Publisher's description


This is the long-awaited compendium of Lewis Baltz’s writings from 1975 until 2007, drawn from his critical writing for magazines such as Art in America, the Times Literary Supplement, L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui and Purple. The book includes Baltz’s texts on Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Robert Adams, Michael Schmidt, Allan Sekuka, Chris Burden, Thomas Ruff, Barry Le Va, Jeff Wall, Félix González-Torres, John McLaughlin, Slavica Perkovic and Krzysztof Wodiczko, among others. This important publication gives Baltz’s literary output the standing it deserves and offers a unique insight into some of history’s leading photographers.


Publisher: Steidl

Size: 135 x 210 mm

160 pages

Lewis Baltz
This is the long-awaited compendium of Lewis Baltz’s writings from 1975 until 2007, drawn from his critical writing for magazines such as Art in America, the Times Literary Supplement, L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui and Purple.
£20.00

Picture of Voyage to Italy

Over the past 30 years, Victor Burgin (born in 1941) has become both a highly influential artist and a renowned theorist of the still and moving image, with work in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Tate Modern in London. Burgin rose to prominence in the late 1960s as an originator of Conceptual art. In the 1970s he worked in large framed photographic sequences, in which printed texts were either juxtaposed with or superimposed on the images. In the 1990s he turned towards digital video. The historian and critic Stephen Bann has written that Burgin's "exploitation of new technologies is itself fairly uninteresting compared with the remarkable consistency of the underlying themes and propositions of his work," among them narrative, memory and fantasy. These duotones refute all that uninteresting technology to offer Burgin's reflections on Pompeii, gleaned through his research of nineteenth-century photographs.

Victor Burgin

Over the past 30 years, Victor Burgin (born in 1941) has become both a highly influential artist and a renowned theorist of the still and moving image, with work in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Tate Modern in London. Burgin rose to prominence in the late 1960s as an originator of Conceptual art. In the 1970s he worked in large framed photographic sequences, in which printed texts were either juxtaposed with or superimposed on the images. In the 1990s he turned towards digital video. The historian and critic Stephen Bann has written that Burgin's "exploitation of new technologies is itself fairly uninteresting compared with the remarkable consistency of the underlying themes and propositions of his work," among them narrative, memory and fantasy. These duotones refute all that uninteresting technology to offer Burgin's reflections on Pompeii, gleaned through his research of nineteenth-century photographs.

£22.50

Picture of Unseen Eye of The Unconscious

Publisher - Thames & Hudson

Binding - Hardback

Publication Date - 2011

Size - 28.00 x 26.00 cm, 320 pages

The Unseen Eye is one of those rare books that has the quality of a revelation.

It not only gives a new perspective on the work of many of the greatest names in the history of photography but also tells us something new about ourselves with all the associated nuances of memory, wit, eroticism, fear, grief and horror.

The photographs have a common theme – the gaze of the subject is averted, the face obscured or the eyes firmly closed. They range from André Breton’s self-portrait to Ruth Snyder in the electric chair in 1928 and from Weegee’s multi-image portrait of Andy Warhol in sunglasses to Robert Mapplethorpe’s photograph of the artist Alice Neel. The images present a catalogue of anti-portraiture, characterized at first glance by what its subjects conceal, not by what the camera reveals.

The author has gathered the images over many years and his selection includes not only many works by famous practitioners from across the history of the medium – Nadar, Brassaï, Walker Evans, Philip Jones Griffiths, Annie Leibovitz, Martin Parr – but also photographs of strange origin taken by anonymous figures from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day.

Running through the book is a commentary which offers the author's own intense and perceptive responses to the images, as well as insights into the psychology of collecting. William A. Ewing, the distinguished curator of photography, contributes an introduction.

William Ewing (ed)

Publisher - Thames & Hudson

Binding - Hardback

Publication Date - 2011

Size - 28.00 x 26.00 cm, 320 pages

The Unseen Eye is one of those rare books that has the quality of a revelation.

It not only gives a new perspective on the work of many of the greatest names in the history of photography but also tells us something new about ourselves with all the associated nuances of memory, wit, eroticism, fear, grief and horror.

The photographs have a common theme – the gaze of the subject is averted, the face obscured or the eyes firmly closed. They range from André Breton’s self-portrait to Ruth Snyder in the electric chair in 1928 and from Weegee’s multi-image portrait of Andy Warhol in sunglasses to Robert Mapplethorpe’s photograph of the artist Alice Neel. The images present a catalogue of anti-portraiture, characterized at first glance by what its subjects conceal, not by what the camera reveals.

The author has gathered the images over many years and his selection includes not only many works by famous practitioners from across the history of the medium – Nadar, Brassaï, Walker Evans, Philip Jones Griffiths, Annie Leibovitz, Martin Parr – but also photographs of strange origin taken by anonymous figures from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day.

Running through the book is a commentary which offers the author's own intense and perceptive responses to the images, as well as insights into the psychology of collecting. William A. Ewing, the distinguished curator of photography, contributes an introduction.

£32.40

Picture of The Conversation Series 10

In recent years no other German conceptual artist has received such worldwide recognition through his consistent artistic work as Thomas Demand. His photographic installations, based on complex work processes, range from the search and selection of motifs, through the construction of paper maquettes, to photographs of the completed installation.

In an intensive conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist, Demand provides precise and insightful information on concepts and rules of operation, the reconstruction and reverberation of history, on work processes and studio reality as well as on his significant recent exhibitions.

English and German text.

Thomas Demand / Hans Ulrich Obrist

In recent years no other German conceptual artist has received such worldwide recognition through his consistent artistic work as Thomas Demand. His photographic installations, based on complex work processes, range from the search and selection of motifs, through the construction of paper maquettes, to photographs of the completed installation.

In an intensive conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist, Demand provides precise and insightful information on concepts and rules of operation, the reconstruction and reverberation of history, on work processes and studio reality as well as on his significant recent exhibitions.

English and German text.

£11.52

Picture of Art Photography Now

Revised and expanded 2011

This lavishly illustrated, accessible survey presents the work of over seventy international artists at the forefront of the boom in photography (e.g. Gursky, Sherman, Calle, Parr, and Barney). Introductions to each section outline the genres and how themes and how issues like memory, time, objectivity, politics, identity and the everyday are tied to certain approaches. Each photographers work is then presented in sequence, with commentaries by the author highlighting the arts most important aspects.

Susan Bright (ed)

Revised and expanded 2011

This lavishly illustrated, accessible survey presents the work of over seventy international artists at the forefront of the boom in photography (e.g. Gursky, Sherman, Calle, Parr, and Barney). Introductions to each section outline the genres and how themes and how issues like memory, time, objectivity, politics, identity and the everyday are tied to certain approaches. Each photographers work is then presented in sequence, with commentaries by the author highlighting the arts most important aspects.

£17.96

Picture of Face: the new photographic portrait
‘Stocked with invaluable commentary, techniques, strategies and subjects as diverse as the society in which we live, Face covers all the bases’ – Amateur Photography
‘Beautiful … fascinating … all [the photos] are captivating in some way’ – Professional Photographer
‘Endlessly fascinating … inspiring and reassuring’ – Image
‘Seminal … both enlightening and interesting … This intriguing collection of portraits is inspiring for anyone wanting to explore and experiment with the exciting aspects of modern-day portraiture’ – Amateur Photography

Now in paperback, this groundbreaking publication announces the death of the conventional portrait.

Exploring bold new strategies of representation – computer manipulation, retouching, photomontage, found imagery and methods of veiling and disguising – the artists here present provocative faces to the world that are sometimes alluring, sometimes touching, sometimes frightening, but never less than riveting.

Whether Gillian Wearing’s masked self-portrait, Aziz + Cucher’s neutral façades, Lawick Müller’s composite portrait of a couple, Cindy Sherman’s disquieting disguises or Orlan’s disturbing experiments with cosmetic surgery, these faces demand our attention.

William Ewing (ed)
‘Stocked with invaluable commentary, techniques, strategies and subjects as diverse as the society in which we live, Face covers all the bases’ – Amateur Photography
‘Beautiful … fascinating … all [the photos] are captivating in some way’ – Professional Photographer
‘Endlessly fascinating … inspiring and reassuring’ – Image
‘Seminal … both enlightening and interesting … This intriguing collection of portraits is inspiring for anyone wanting to explore and experiment with the exciting aspects of modern-day portraiture’ – Amateur Photography

Now in paperback, this groundbreaking publication announces the death of the conventional portrait.

Exploring bold new strategies of representation – computer manipulation, retouching, photomontage, found imagery and methods of veiling and disguising – the artists here present provocative faces to the world that are sometimes alluring, sometimes touching, sometimes frightening, but never less than riveting.

Whether Gillian Wearing’s masked self-portrait, Aziz + Cucher’s neutral façades, Lawick Müller’s composite portrait of a couple, Cindy Sherman’s disquieting disguises or Orlan’s disturbing experiments with cosmetic surgery, these faces demand our attention.

£17.96

Picture of Picturing Atrocity - Photography in Crisis
Publisher's Description
Ever since the landmark publication of Susan Sontag’s On Photography, it has been impossible to look at photographs, particularly those of violence and suffering, without questioning our role as photographic voyeur. Are we desensitized by the proliferation of these images? Or do the images stir our own sense of justice and act as a call to arms? Are we consuming the suffering of others? What should our responses to these images be?

To answer these questions, Picturing Atrocity brings together essays from some of the foremost writers on photography today, including Rebecca Solnit, Alfredo Jaar, Ariella Azoulay, John Lucaites, Robert Hariman and Susan Meiselas, to offer close readings of images that reveal the realities behind the photographs, the subjects and the photographers. From the massacre of the Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee to the torture of prisoners at Abu Ghraib, from famine in China to apartheid in South Africa, Picturing Atrocity examines a broad spectrum of photographs. Each essay focuses specifically on an iconic image, offering a distinct approach and context, in order to enable us to look again – this time more closely – at the picture. In addition, four photo-essays showcase the work of photographers involved in the making of photographs of brutality as well as the artists’ own reflections on these images.

Together these essays cover the historical and geographical range of atrocity photographs and respond to current concerns about such disturbing images. Picturing Atrocity is an important read, not just for insights into photography, but for its reflections on human injustice and suffering. In keeping with that aim, all royalties from the book will be donated to Amnesty International.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 234 x 168 mm
256 pages, 73 illustrations, 15 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 20.00
Geoffrey Batchen, Mick Gidley, Nancy K. Miller and Jay Prosser
Publisher's Description
Ever since the landmark publication of Susan Sontag’s On Photography, it has been impossible to look at photographs, particularly those of violence and suffering, without questioning our role as photographic voyeur. Are we desensitized by the proliferation of these images? Or do the images stir our own sense of justice and act as a call to arms? Are we consuming the suffering of others? What should our responses to these images be?

To answer these questions, Picturing Atrocity brings together essays from some of the foremost writers on photography today, including Rebecca Solnit, Alfredo Jaar, Ariella Azoulay, John Lucaites, Robert Hariman and Susan Meiselas, to offer close readings of images that reveal the realities behind the photographs, the subjects and the photographers. From the massacre of the Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee to the torture of prisoners at Abu Ghraib, from famine in China to apartheid in South Africa, Picturing Atrocity examines a broad spectrum of photographs. Each essay focuses specifically on an iconic image, offering a distinct approach and context, in order to enable us to look again – this time more closely – at the picture. In addition, four photo-essays showcase the work of photographers involved in the making of photographs of brutality as well as the artists’ own reflections on these images.

Together these essays cover the historical and geographical range of atrocity photographs and respond to current concerns about such disturbing images. Picturing Atrocity is an important read, not just for insights into photography, but for its reflections on human injustice and suffering. In keeping with that aim, all royalties from the book will be donated to Amnesty International.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 234 x 168 mm
256 pages, 73 illustrations, 15 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 20.00
£18.00

Picture of Photography and Ireland
Publisher's Description
Photography has been part of Irish cultural life since 1839 but little is known of its long and sometimes complex history. Outside Ireland there has been scant attention given to Irish photography beyond picturesque tourist views of the Irish landscape and photojournalistic representations of 'The Troubles'. This book changes the picture, casting its focus between these polar, and often clichéd, extremes to address the political upheavals, social transformation and geographical re-imaginings of Ireland as a colony, a nation, a province and a sovereign state.

As Justin Carville demonstrates, photography has not only documented these transformations but has also helped shape how Ireland is viewed, both by itself and the rest of the world. Photography and Ireland explores the role of the photographic image in colonial and post-colonial visual cultures of Ireland from the nineteenth century to the present day. Furthermore, it emphasises the transnational dimensions of photography in Ireland, discussing foreign photographers who have contributed to cultural imaginings of Ireland as well as indigenous Irish photographers. Beginning with a brief history of photography in Ireland the book discusses the tensions between colonial and global representations of Ireland and the formation of an indigenous photographic culture. Featuring commercial portraits and landscapes, as well as ethnographic photography, photojournalism and documentary works it explores Ireland’s photography through a number of interrelated themes.

Accessibly written and accompanied by a wealth of images, Photography and Ireland is essential reading for all those interested in photography history, as well as Irish history and culture.

'Dedicated to an exploration of photography's capacity to induce "geographical imaginings" of Ireland and the Irish, Justin Carville's thoughtful book highlights a history that has been insufficiently understood by outsiders. Addressing the complexities of national history, revealed here as a discourse simultaneously impossible and necessary, Carville offers a meditation on photography of interest to all.'
– Geoffrey Batchen, Professor of Art History, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
216 pages, 125 illustrations, 113 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
Justin Carville
Publisher's Description
Photography has been part of Irish cultural life since 1839 but little is known of its long and sometimes complex history. Outside Ireland there has been scant attention given to Irish photography beyond picturesque tourist views of the Irish landscape and photojournalistic representations of 'The Troubles'. This book changes the picture, casting its focus between these polar, and often clichéd, extremes to address the political upheavals, social transformation and geographical re-imaginings of Ireland as a colony, a nation, a province and a sovereign state.

As Justin Carville demonstrates, photography has not only documented these transformations but has also helped shape how Ireland is viewed, both by itself and the rest of the world. Photography and Ireland explores the role of the photographic image in colonial and post-colonial visual cultures of Ireland from the nineteenth century to the present day. Furthermore, it emphasises the transnational dimensions of photography in Ireland, discussing foreign photographers who have contributed to cultural imaginings of Ireland as well as indigenous Irish photographers. Beginning with a brief history of photography in Ireland the book discusses the tensions between colonial and global representations of Ireland and the formation of an indigenous photographic culture. Featuring commercial portraits and landscapes, as well as ethnographic photography, photojournalism and documentary works it explores Ireland’s photography through a number of interrelated themes.

Accessibly written and accompanied by a wealth of images, Photography and Ireland is essential reading for all those interested in photography history, as well as Irish history and culture.

'Dedicated to an exploration of photography's capacity to induce "geographical imaginings" of Ireland and the Irish, Justin Carville's thoughtful book highlights a history that has been insufficiently understood by outsiders. Addressing the complexities of national history, revealed here as a discourse simultaneously impossible and necessary, Carville offers a meditation on photography of interest to all.'
– Geoffrey Batchen, Professor of Art History, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
216 pages, 125 illustrations, 113 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
£16.16

Picture of Beginning and the End of the World: St Andrews, Scandal and the Birth of Photograph
Publisher's Description
In a work of spectacular imagination and remarkable synthesis, Robert Crawford celebrates St Andrews, the first town in the English-speaking world to have its people, buildings and natural environment thoroughly documented through photography. The Beginning and the End of the World tells the stories of several pioneering Scottish photographers. Yet it also places them within the extraordinary intellectual life of an eccentric society rich in sometimes apocalyptically-minded Victorian inventors and authors whose work has had an international impact.

Robert Crawford is Professor of Modern Scottish Literature at St Andrews University. He received his MA from Glasgow University and his DPhil from Oxford. He is a founding Fellow of the English Association and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He has taught at the universities of Oxford and Glasgow, and has been at St Andrews since 1989.

'A work of spectacular imagination and remarkable synthesis,' - British Photographic History

'The kind of intellectually fleet-footed work only a poet and critic could produce' - Scotland on Sunday

Publisher: Birlinn
272 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 16.99
Robert Crawford
Publisher's Description
In a work of spectacular imagination and remarkable synthesis, Robert Crawford celebrates St Andrews, the first town in the English-speaking world to have its people, buildings and natural environment thoroughly documented through photography. The Beginning and the End of the World tells the stories of several pioneering Scottish photographers. Yet it also places them within the extraordinary intellectual life of an eccentric society rich in sometimes apocalyptically-minded Victorian inventors and authors whose work has had an international impact.

Robert Crawford is Professor of Modern Scottish Literature at St Andrews University. He received his MA from Glasgow University and his DPhil from Oxford. He is a founding Fellow of the English Association and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He has taught at the universities of Oxford and Glasgow, and has been at St Andrews since 1989.

'A work of spectacular imagination and remarkable synthesis,' - British Photographic History

'The kind of intellectually fleet-footed work only a poet and critic could produce' - Scotland on Sunday

Publisher: Birlinn
272 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 16.99
£15.29

Picture of Single Exposures 3
Publisher's Description
  • 1-page observations in a quick-read format

  • Compiled from the best of Brooks Jensen's almost-daily podcasts on photography.

Partial List of Topics:
The Seduction of Potential; The Public’s Perception of Our Career; What Does It Mean That You’ve Signed Your Print?; Intellectual Property; The Intangibles; The Private Collection of Edgar Dégas - and Your Friends;, Storytelling; Virginia Woolf on Creativity; Random Thoughts; Intellectual Property Rights and Location Photography; Photography as Personally Expressive Art; Making a Group Gathering Meaningful; Family Photos in the Digital Age; An Example of How Genius Is Often Just a Happy Accident; A Self-imposed Moratorium; Artificial Light x 4; The Z Axis; Lessons from the Antiques Roadshow; Reading to Your Cat; In Praise of the Small Book; What Makes a Good Fine Art Photograph?; What is the Black and White Equivalent of Angry Red?; Success is Something You Earn; Copyright Lessons from Don Quixote; Memories - Both Visual and Aural; How to Become a Successful and Famous Painter; Characteristics of a Bad Photograph; The Act of Discovery; — and many, many more!

Publisher: Lenswork
189 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
Brooks Jensen
Publisher's Description
  • 1-page observations in a quick-read format

  • Compiled from the best of Brooks Jensen's almost-daily podcasts on photography.

Partial List of Topics:
The Seduction of Potential; The Public’s Perception of Our Career; What Does It Mean That You’ve Signed Your Print?; Intellectual Property; The Intangibles; The Private Collection of Edgar Dégas - and Your Friends;, Storytelling; Virginia Woolf on Creativity; Random Thoughts; Intellectual Property Rights and Location Photography; Photography as Personally Expressive Art; Making a Group Gathering Meaningful; Family Photos in the Digital Age; An Example of How Genius Is Often Just a Happy Accident; A Self-imposed Moratorium; Artificial Light x 4; The Z Axis; Lessons from the Antiques Roadshow; Reading to Your Cat; In Praise of the Small Book; What Makes a Good Fine Art Photograph?; What is the Black and White Equivalent of Angry Red?; Success is Something You Earn; Copyright Lessons from Don Quixote; Memories - Both Visual and Aural; How to Become a Successful and Famous Painter; Characteristics of a Bad Photograph; The Act of Discovery; — and many, many more!

Publisher: Lenswork
189 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
£11.66

Picture of Seeing through Race - A Reinterpretation of Civil Rights Photography
Publisher's Description
Seeing through Race is a boldly original reinterpretation of the iconic photographs of the black civil rights struggle. Martin A. Berger’s provocative and groundbreaking study shows how the very pictures credited with arousing white sympathy, and thereby paving the way for civil rights legislation, actually limited the scope of racial reform in the 1960s. Berger analyzes many of these famous images—dogs and fire hoses turned against peaceful black marchers in Birmingham, tear gas and clubs wielded against voting-rights marchers in Selma—and argues that because white sympathy was dependent on photographs of powerless blacks, these unforgettable pictures undermined efforts to enact—or even imagine—reforms that threatened to upend the racial balance of power.

Publisher: University of California Press
264 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 19.95
Martin A. Berger
Publisher's Description
Seeing through Race is a boldly original reinterpretation of the iconic photographs of the black civil rights struggle. Martin A. Berger’s provocative and groundbreaking study shows how the very pictures credited with arousing white sympathy, and thereby paving the way for civil rights legislation, actually limited the scope of racial reform in the 1960s. Berger analyzes many of these famous images—dogs and fire hoses turned against peaceful black marchers in Birmingham, tear gas and clubs wielded against voting-rights marchers in Selma—and argues that because white sympathy was dependent on photographs of powerless blacks, these unforgettable pictures undermined efforts to enact—or even imagine—reforms that threatened to upend the racial balance of power.

Publisher: University of California Press
264 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 19.95
£17.96

Picture of Photography and Japan
Publisher's Description
What defines Japanese photography? Is there a distinctive Japanese photographic aesthetic? In Photography and Japan, Karen M. Fraser argues that the diversity of styles, subjects and functions of Japanese photography precludes easy categorization along nationalized lines. Rather, the development of photography within Japan is best understood by examining its close relationship with the country’s dramatic history.

This book traces 150 years of photography, a period during which Japan has experienced some of the most significant events in modern history: a remarkable transformation from an isolated, feudal country into an industrialized, modern world power during the late nineteenth century, an equally striking rise and fall as an imperial power during the ?rst half of the twentieth century, and a miraculous economic recovery in the decades following the utter devastation of World War Two. The history of photography has paralleled these events, becoming inextricably linked with notions of modernity and cultural change from the time it first arrived in the mid-nineteenth century.

The author considers this intertwined history by tracing the intersection of photog­raphy and social history, focusing on the role of the camera in documenting key cultural and political events and in exploring social responses to cultural change. Thematic chapters that focus on photography’s role in negotiating cultural identity, war photog­raphy and the documentation of urban life introduce many photographs that will be unfamiliar to Western viewers, and provide a broadened cultural context for more well-known images.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
192 pages, 100 illustrations, 70 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
Karen M. Fraser
Publisher's Description
What defines Japanese photography? Is there a distinctive Japanese photographic aesthetic? In Photography and Japan, Karen M. Fraser argues that the diversity of styles, subjects and functions of Japanese photography precludes easy categorization along nationalized lines. Rather, the development of photography within Japan is best understood by examining its close relationship with the country’s dramatic history.

This book traces 150 years of photography, a period during which Japan has experienced some of the most significant events in modern history: a remarkable transformation from an isolated, feudal country into an industrialized, modern world power during the late nineteenth century, an equally striking rise and fall as an imperial power during the ?rst half of the twentieth century, and a miraculous economic recovery in the decades following the utter devastation of World War Two. The history of photography has paralleled these events, becoming inextricably linked with notions of modernity and cultural change from the time it first arrived in the mid-nineteenth century.

The author considers this intertwined history by tracing the intersection of photog­raphy and social history, focusing on the role of the camera in documenting key cultural and political events and in exploring social responses to cultural change. Thematic chapters that focus on photography’s role in negotiating cultural identity, war photog­raphy and the documentation of urban life introduce many photographs that will be unfamiliar to Western viewers, and provide a broadened cultural context for more well-known images.

Publisher: Reaktion
Size: 220 x 190 mm
192 pages, 100 illustrations, 70 in colour

Publisher's Price: £ 17.95
£16.16

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