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Picture of TJ/Double Negative
Publisher's Description
A unique event in publishing: the work of a world-renowned photographer and a world-class novelist brought together in one collector's edition.

This publication is the product of the collaboration of two of the finest creative individuals at work in South Africa today, a photographer and a novelist, on a project that is the city of Johannesburg.

‘Johannesburg is a fragmented city. It is not a place of smoothly integrated parts. And it has a name that does not roll easily off the tongue.' So begins David Goldblatt's introduction to TJ, a book of photographs of Johannesburg: the City of Gold, Chowburg, eGoli, Jozi, Goutini, Duiwel's Dorp. Commencing in the 1950s, his masterful lens probes, documents and comments on life over six decades in this incomparable African city. Selected form a massive body of work, this superb distillation presents a unique pictorial history of the city.

A new novel by Ivan Vladislavic is the partner of the book of photographs, in a sleeved set beautifully produced in Italy, is. In Double Negative, a young man in Johannesburg receives from a senior photographer an induction into the intricate nature of photography and artistic representation. ‘If,' he says, ‘I try to imagine the lives going on in all these houses, the domestic dramas, the family sagas, it seems impossibly complicated. How could you ever do justice to something so rich in detail? You couldn't do it in a novel, let alone a photograph.' The novel traces the young man as he heads into his career that takes him overseas and back, developing in the process an ever widening perspective on not only the social and political change in the country but also on questions to do with observation and the observing subject. It brings into sharp focus the history of South Africa's recent past and the difficulty of imaging and re-imagining it.

You can view images from this book on the Umuzi website.

Publisher: Umuzi
Size: 280 x 270 mm

300 pages

Publisher's Price: $ 85
David Goldblatt and Ivan Vladislavic
Publisher's Description
A unique event in publishing: the work of a world-renowned photographer and a world-class novelist brought together in one collector's edition.

This publication is the product of the collaboration of two of the finest creative individuals at work in South Africa today, a photographer and a novelist, on a project that is the city of Johannesburg.

‘Johannesburg is a fragmented city. It is not a place of smoothly integrated parts. And it has a name that does not roll easily off the tongue.' So begins David Goldblatt's introduction to TJ, a book of photographs of Johannesburg: the City of Gold, Chowburg, eGoli, Jozi, Goutini, Duiwel's Dorp. Commencing in the 1950s, his masterful lens probes, documents and comments on life over six decades in this incomparable African city. Selected form a massive body of work, this superb distillation presents a unique pictorial history of the city.

A new novel by Ivan Vladislavic is the partner of the book of photographs, in a sleeved set beautifully produced in Italy, is. In Double Negative, a young man in Johannesburg receives from a senior photographer an induction into the intricate nature of photography and artistic representation. ‘If,' he says, ‘I try to imagine the lives going on in all these houses, the domestic dramas, the family sagas, it seems impossibly complicated. How could you ever do justice to something so rich in detail? You couldn't do it in a novel, let alone a photograph.' The novel traces the young man as he heads into his career that takes him overseas and back, developing in the process an ever widening perspective on not only the social and political change in the country but also on questions to do with observation and the observing subject. It brings into sharp focus the history of South Africa's recent past and the difficulty of imaging and re-imagining it.

You can view images from this book on the Umuzi website.

Publisher: Umuzi
Size: 280 x 270 mm

300 pages

Publisher's Price: $ 85
£61.50

Picture of Writing the Picture
'This book is among the most critically and financially risky of enterprises: a combination of the work of a well-known photographer with that of an equally well-known poet. Collaborators over the decades, David Hurn and John Fuller insist that neither of their work is intended to illustrate the other. Presumably, its role is to create a fresh synthesis that amounts to more than a sum of the parts, while acknowledging that both image and verse can stand alone. Much is down to how the combination works on the page. The format is traditional: each double-spread awards the verso to the poem and the recto to the photo, following the journalistic idiom that the reader's eye is always first drawn to the right-hand image.

Hurn, an Englishman living on the Welsh borders, has been documenting his adoptive homeland for the past 40 years. The majority of these beautifully reproduced black-and-white images date back to another Wales: that of miners, their faces stained black with coal, their teeth bared white as minstrels'; of the marching band that accompanied a rugby team, preceded by a shaggy dog and two kids racing a metal pram down the road; and a name-check of the most famed and favoured of Welsh poets, his curling photo-portrait in a café in the seaside village where Dylan Thomas wrote in his boathouse – as it were, a dual reference to both the poet and the photographer.

The words, provided by a poet who has spent long years as an Oxford academic, are often surprisingly populist and lyrical. The NUM banner on parade ('Mardy Lodge: Forward to Socialism') opens with a verse: 'I saw my valley taken/ For a bondman's wage./ When will we awaken?' The deliberate historicity of 'bondman' followed at once with the question, as much of the hymnal as a political slogan, could as well be sung. Lyricism abounds in another of Hurn's favourite subjects, a wild colt, arched white against the dark gorse, reframed by Fuller as: 'I dreamed a pony that could fly:/he suddenly looked up at me/With horizons in his eye'.

Deprivation, however, has less elegant aspects. The old sailor still squeezes his accordion, and is photographed with a bollard behind his shoulder, as if it were a lighthouse. But the young woman shooting up on bare floorboards beside a dirty lavatory bowl makes a clear statement: 'Don't any of you look at me./ I am not here'.

Perhaps the authors protest too much. After an initial discussion, included in the fascinating introduction, they concur that the specificity of a poem can only follow on that of the image, not the reverse. Either way, this brave volume offers a proud collaboration between two masters of their chosen arts.' As reviewed by Amanda Hopkinson for The Independent, August 2010

Publisher: Seren


Publisher's Price: £19.99
David Hurn & John Fuller
'This book is among the most critically and financially risky of enterprises: a combination of the work of a well-known photographer with that of an equally well-known poet. Collaborators over the decades, David Hurn and John Fuller insist that neither of their work is intended to illustrate the other. Presumably, its role is to create a fresh synthesis that amounts to more than a sum of the parts, while acknowledging that both image and verse can stand alone. Much is down to how the combination works on the page. The format is traditional: each double-spread awards the verso to the poem and the recto to the photo, following the journalistic idiom that the reader's eye is always first drawn to the right-hand image.

Hurn, an Englishman living on the Welsh borders, has been documenting his adoptive homeland for the past 40 years. The majority of these beautifully reproduced black-and-white images date back to another Wales: that of miners, their faces stained black with coal, their teeth bared white as minstrels'; of the marching band that accompanied a rugby team, preceded by a shaggy dog and two kids racing a metal pram down the road; and a name-check of the most famed and favoured of Welsh poets, his curling photo-portrait in a café in the seaside village where Dylan Thomas wrote in his boathouse – as it were, a dual reference to both the poet and the photographer.

The words, provided by a poet who has spent long years as an Oxford academic, are often surprisingly populist and lyrical. The NUM banner on parade ('Mardy Lodge: Forward to Socialism') opens with a verse: 'I saw my valley taken/ For a bondman's wage./ When will we awaken?' The deliberate historicity of 'bondman' followed at once with the question, as much of the hymnal as a political slogan, could as well be sung. Lyricism abounds in another of Hurn's favourite subjects, a wild colt, arched white against the dark gorse, reframed by Fuller as: 'I dreamed a pony that could fly:/he suddenly looked up at me/With horizons in his eye'.

Deprivation, however, has less elegant aspects. The old sailor still squeezes his accordion, and is photographed with a bollard behind his shoulder, as if it were a lighthouse. But the young woman shooting up on bare floorboards beside a dirty lavatory bowl makes a clear statement: 'Don't any of you look at me./ I am not here'.

Perhaps the authors protest too much. After an initial discussion, included in the fascinating introduction, they concur that the specificity of a poem can only follow on that of the image, not the reverse. Either way, this brave volume offers a proud collaboration between two masters of their chosen arts.' As reviewed by Amanda Hopkinson for The Independent, August 2010

Publisher: Seren


Publisher's Price: £19.99
£17.99

Picture of And the Land Lay Still

Anyone keeping up with the contemporary Scottish novel will know what a great writer James Robertson is. In his latest novel And the Land Lay Still, two of the leading characters are photographers. Michael Pendreich is curating an exhibition of photographs by his late, celebrated father Angus for the National Gallery of Photography in Edinburgh. The show will cover fifty years of Scottish life but, as he arranges the images and writes his catalogue essay, what story is Michael really trying to tell: his father's, his own or that of Scotland itself? The novel was very favourably reviewed by Irvine Welsh: “he maintains the pace and luminous prose that make his books such a joy to read. And the Land Lay Still is a wonderful novel, brilliant in a very different way from its acclaimed predecessor, The Testament of Gideon Mack. The book represents nothing less than a landmark for the novel in Scotland.”


Publisher: Penguin paperback
Size: 153 x 234 mm
688 pages

James Robertson
A great 'state of Scotland' novel with two photographers as protagonists.
£8.99

Picture of Photography Degree Zero - Reflections on Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida
Publisher's Description
Roland Barthes's 1980 book Camera Lucida is perhaps the most influential book ever published on photography. The terms studium and punctum, coined by Barthes for two different ways of responding to photographs, are part of the standard lexicon for discussions of photography; Barthes's understanding of photographic time and the relationship he forges between photography and death have been invoked countless times in photographic discourse; and the current interest in vernacular photographs and the ubiquity of subjective, even novelistic, ways of writing about photography both owe something to Barthes. Photography Degree Zero, the first anthology of writings on Camera Lucida, goes beyond the usual critical orthodoxies to offer a range of perspectives on Barthes's important book.

Photography Degree Zero (the title links Barthes's first book, Writing Degree Zero, to his last, Camera Lucida) includes essays written soon after Barthes's book appeared as well as more recent rereadings of it, some previously unpublished. The contributors' approaches range from psychoanalytical (in an essay drawing on the work of Lacan) to Buddhist (in an essay that compares the photographic flash to the mystic's light of revelation); they include a history of Barthes's writings on photography and an account of Camera Lucida and its reception; two views of the book through the lens of race; and a provocative essay by Michael Fried and two responses to it.

The variety of perspectives included in Photography Degree Zero, and the focus on Camera Lucida in the context of photography rather than literature or philosophy, serve to reopen a vital conversation on Barthes's influential work.

Publisher: MIT Press
Size: 22.9 x 19 x 2.3 cm
320 pages, 5 duotones

Publisher's Price: £22.95
Edited by Geoffrey Batchen
Publisher's Description
Roland Barthes's 1980 book Camera Lucida is perhaps the most influential book ever published on photography. The terms studium and punctum, coined by Barthes for two different ways of responding to photographs, are part of the standard lexicon for discussions of photography; Barthes's understanding of photographic time and the relationship he forges between photography and death have been invoked countless times in photographic discourse; and the current interest in vernacular photographs and the ubiquity of subjective, even novelistic, ways of writing about photography both owe something to Barthes. Photography Degree Zero, the first anthology of writings on Camera Lucida, goes beyond the usual critical orthodoxies to offer a range of perspectives on Barthes's important book.

Photography Degree Zero (the title links Barthes's first book, Writing Degree Zero, to his last, Camera Lucida) includes essays written soon after Barthes's book appeared as well as more recent rereadings of it, some previously unpublished. The contributors' approaches range from psychoanalytical (in an essay drawing on the work of Lacan) to Buddhist (in an essay that compares the photographic flash to the mystic's light of revelation); they include a history of Barthes's writings on photography and an account of Camera Lucida and its reception; two views of the book through the lens of race; and a provocative essay by Michael Fried and two responses to it.

The variety of perspectives included in Photography Degree Zero, and the focus on Camera Lucida in the context of photography rather than literature or philosophy, serve to reopen a vital conversation on Barthes's influential work.

Publisher: MIT Press
Size: 22.9 x 19 x 2.3 cm
320 pages, 5 duotones

Publisher's Price: £22.95
£20.66

Picture of Writing on the Edge - Great Contemporary Writers on the Front Line of Crisis
Publisher's Description
Powerful essays by such luminaries and literary giants as Daniel Day-Lewis and Martin Amis offer a compassionate look at the crises that most affect our world today.

An important book for anyone interested in global issues, Writing on the Edge features twelve essays that take the reader to countries in crisis. Award-winning writer Martin Amis experienced firsthand the problems of gang violence in Colombia, South America; New York Times bestselling author Tracy Chevalier focuses on the abuse of women in Burundi, East Africa; Oscar-winning actor Daniel Day-Lewis writes of meeting children raised in war-torn Palestine; Booker Prize–winning author DBC Pierre addresses the unusually high incidence of mental health issues in Armenia. Award-winning photographer Tom Craig was commissioned by the humanitarian charity Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders to document the writers in these places in trouble. His striking photographs amplify the sense of compassion required while also demonstrating that beautiful humanity is the victim of tragedy.

Publisher: Rizzoli
Size: 6 x 9'
276 pages, 150 - 200 illustrations

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
Edited by Dan Crowe, Photographed by Tom Craig
Publisher's Description
Powerful essays by such luminaries and literary giants as Daniel Day-Lewis and Martin Amis offer a compassionate look at the crises that most affect our world today.

An important book for anyone interested in global issues, Writing on the Edge features twelve essays that take the reader to countries in crisis. Award-winning writer Martin Amis experienced firsthand the problems of gang violence in Colombia, South America; New York Times bestselling author Tracy Chevalier focuses on the abuse of women in Burundi, East Africa; Oscar-winning actor Daniel Day-Lewis writes of meeting children raised in war-torn Palestine; Booker Prize–winning author DBC Pierre addresses the unusually high incidence of mental health issues in Armenia. Award-winning photographer Tom Craig was commissioned by the humanitarian charity Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders to document the writers in these places in trouble. His striking photographs amplify the sense of compassion required while also demonstrating that beautiful humanity is the victim of tragedy.

Publisher: Rizzoli
Size: 6 x 9'
276 pages, 150 - 200 illustrations

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
£19.95

Picture of Beat Memories - The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg
Publisher's Description
This intimate 'family album' is a revealing photographic look at the Beat Generation as chronicled by the movement's great poet Allen Ginsberg.

Allen Ginsberg began photographing in the late 1940s when he purchased a small, second-hand Kodak camera. For the next fifteen years he took photographs of himself, his friends, and lovers, including the writers and poets Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Gregory Corso as well as Beat personality Neal Cassady. He abandoned photography in 1963 and took it up again in the 1980s, when he was encouraged by photographers Berenice Abbott and Robert Frank to reprint his earlier work and make new portraits; these included more images of longtime friends as well other acquaintances such as painters Larry Rivers and Francesco Clemente and musician Bob Dylan. Ginsberg’s photographs form a compelling portrait of the Beat and counterculture generation from the 1950s to the 1990s. Far more than historical documents, his photographs and the extensive inscriptions he added to them years later preserve what he referred to as “the sacredness of the moment,” the often joyous communion of friends and the poignancy of looking back to intensely felt times. More than seventy prints are brilliantly reproduced in this book and accompanied by Sarah Greenough’s essay on Ginsberg’s photography in relation to his poetry and other photographers of the time, a chronology of his photographic activity, and selections from interviews with Ginsberg between 1958 and 1996.

Publisher: Prestel
Size: 240 x 280 mm
144 pages

This title will usually be dispatched within 2 days
Sarah Greenough
Publisher's Description
This intimate 'family album' is a revealing photographic look at the Beat Generation as chronicled by the movement's great poet Allen Ginsberg.

Allen Ginsberg began photographing in the late 1940s when he purchased a small, second-hand Kodak camera. For the next fifteen years he took photographs of himself, his friends, and lovers, including the writers and poets Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Gregory Corso as well as Beat personality Neal Cassady. He abandoned photography in 1963 and took it up again in the 1980s, when he was encouraged by photographers Berenice Abbott and Robert Frank to reprint his earlier work and make new portraits; these included more images of longtime friends as well other acquaintances such as painters Larry Rivers and Francesco Clemente and musician Bob Dylan. Ginsberg’s photographs form a compelling portrait of the Beat and counterculture generation from the 1950s to the 1990s. Far more than historical documents, his photographs and the extensive inscriptions he added to them years later preserve what he referred to as “the sacredness of the moment,” the often joyous communion of friends and the poignancy of looking back to intensely felt times. More than seventy prints are brilliantly reproduced in this book and accompanied by Sarah Greenough’s essay on Ginsberg’s photography in relation to his poetry and other photographers of the time, a chronology of his photographic activity, and selections from interviews with Ginsberg between 1958 and 1996.

Publisher: Prestel
Size: 240 x 280 mm
144 pages

This title will usually be dispatched within 2 days
£29.99

Picture of Single Exposures 2
Publisher's Description
Over 160 topics 1-page observations in a quick-read format Compiled from the best of Brooks Jensen's almost-daily podcasts on photography.

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
189 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
Brooks Jensen
Publisher's Description
Over 160 topics 1-page observations in a quick-read format Compiled from the best of Brooks Jensen's almost-daily podcasts on photography.

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
189 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 12.95
£11.66

Picture of On Being a Photographer

Publisher's Description
“A photographer might forget his camera and live to tell the tale. But no photographer who survives has ever forgotten the lessons in this book. It is not just essential reading, it’s compulsory.” Daniel Meadows Head of Photojournalism, Center for Journalism Studies University of Wales “I read On Being a Photographer in one sitting. This is an invaluable book for its historical and aesthetic references as well as David’s words, which go to the heart of every committed photographer - from the heart of a great photographer. It is inspiring.” Frank Hoy, Associate Professor, Visual Journalism The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Telecommunication Arizona State University

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
145 pages

David Hurn & Bill Jay

Publisher's Description
“A photographer might forget his camera and live to tell the tale. But no photographer who survives has ever forgotten the lessons in this book. It is not just essential reading, it’s compulsory.” Daniel Meadows Head of Photojournalism, Center for Journalism Studies University of Wales “I read On Being a Photographer in one sitting. This is an invaluable book for its historical and aesthetic references as well as David’s words, which go to the heart of every committed photographer - from the heart of a great photographer. It is inspiring.” Frank Hoy, Associate Professor, Visual Journalism The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Telecommunication Arizona State University

Now exclusively available through Beyond Words

Publisher:Lenswork Publishing
Size: 5 ¼ x 7 ½'
145 pages

£14.95

Picture of Love in black and white
Publisher's Description
British-born photographer Michael Kenna and Brazilian-born author Bianca Rossini worked together to create a book of photographs and poems entitled “Love in black and white.' Beautifully printed on natural Japanese paper in a limited edition of 1,500 hardcover copies, this gorgeous new book comprises 45 of Rossini’s original love poems, accompanied by selected photographs of Kenna’s landscapes made in locations around the world. Michael Kenna's photographs have been the subject of over thirty books and catalogues, and are included in such permanent museum collections as The National Gallery, Washington, D.C.; The Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai; and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London. In 2001, Kenna was made a Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters by the Ministry of Culture in France. Bianca Rossini is a singer, songwriter and author. Her upcoming Bossa Nova album features her original songs co-written with great American and Brazilian composers. As an actress Bianca has acted opposite film stars including James Spader, Hector Elizondo, Richard Dreyfuss, Christian Slater, Dick Van Dyke and Dom DeLuise. 'Love in black and white' is her third book.

Publisher: Nazraeli Press
Size: 8 x 10'
96 pages, 45 duotone plate

Publisher's Price: £40.00
Michael Kenna
Publisher's Description
British-born photographer Michael Kenna and Brazilian-born author Bianca Rossini worked together to create a book of photographs and poems entitled “Love in black and white.' Beautifully printed on natural Japanese paper in a limited edition of 1,500 hardcover copies, this gorgeous new book comprises 45 of Rossini’s original love poems, accompanied by selected photographs of Kenna’s landscapes made in locations around the world. Michael Kenna's photographs have been the subject of over thirty books and catalogues, and are included in such permanent museum collections as The National Gallery, Washington, D.C.; The Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai; and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London. In 2001, Kenna was made a Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters by the Ministry of Culture in France. Bianca Rossini is a singer, songwriter and author. Her upcoming Bossa Nova album features her original songs co-written with great American and Brazilian composers. As an actress Bianca has acted opposite film stars including James Spader, Hector Elizondo, Richard Dreyfuss, Christian Slater, Dick Van Dyke and Dom DeLuise. 'Love in black and white' is her third book.

Publisher: Nazraeli Press
Size: 8 x 10'
96 pages, 45 duotone plate

Publisher's Price: £40.00
£50.00

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