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Picture of Taking Shots: The Photography of William Burroughs

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Marking the centenary of William S. Burroughs’s birth, this exciting book reproduces the celebrated writer’s many rarely seen photographs.

Renowned and highly regarded for his experiments with literature, painting, film, and music, William S. Burroughs was also a prolific photographer. However, his photographic work, consisting of several thousand images, has so far received little critical attention or sustained public exposure. This book reproduces many previously unseen photographs and offers fascinating insights into his photographic practices. It also provides convincing evidence that his photos should be considered a significant aspect of his entire body of work. It includes portraits and self-portraits, location shots from his travels in Europe, the Americas, and North Africa, images of construction and demolition sites, and his individual and collaborative experiments with photomontage, assemblage, and collage. Essays by internationally acclaimed scholars of photography and of Burroughs’s work offer a variety of critical perspectives on his photographic oeuvre, examining its sources, methodologies, biographical contexts, influences, and purposes. Certain to appeal to his many devoted fans, this publication also coincides with a recent revival of critical and cultural interest in the 1960s art scene and the Beat Generation’s writers and artists.

Publisher: Prestel

Size: 240 x 280 mm

160 pages150 b/w illustrations


Marking the centenary of William S. Burroughs’s birth, this exciting book reproduces the celebrated writer’s many rarely seen photographs.
£26.99

Picture of Understanding a Photograph

Publisher's Decription

John Berger's essays on photography are some of the most stimulating and original of the twentieth century. Like Susan Sontag and Roland Barthes, Berger created a distinctive, highly personal way of thinking and writing about the medium  but he also went an important step further. With long-time collaborator Jean Mohr, photographer and writer combined images and text in a series of innovative and ground-breaking books.


Arranged chronologically, this selection contains essays from books by Berger and previously uncollected pieces written for exhibitions and catalogues. Displaying the fierce engagement that marks his writing on painting and the human sympathy of his fiction, Berger probes the work of photographers  including Henri Cartier-Bresson and W. Eugene Smith  and the lives of those photographed. Interrogating the visible, Berger proceeds with the intensity and tenderness urged by D. H. Lawrence: 'gazing on to the face of life, and reading what can be read.'

The selection is made and introduced by Geoff Dyer, author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book on photography, The Ongoing Moment.

'One of the most influential intellectuals of our time' Observer

'Berger handles thoughts the way an artist handles paint' Jeanette Winterson

Publisher: Penguin

240 pages

John Berger
A selection of John Berger's writings on photography, including astonishing images, edited and selected by Geoff Dyer.
£8.99

Picture of And Every Day Was Overcast

Publisher's Description

Out of South Florida’s lush and decaying suburban landscape blooms the delinquent magic and chaotic adolescence of And Every Day Was Overcast.

Paul Kwiatkowski’s arresting photographs amplify a novel of profound vision and vulnerability. Drugs, teenage cruelty, wonder, and the screen-flickering worlds of Predator and Married…With Children shape and warp the narrator’s developing sense of self as he navigates adventures and misadventures, from an ill-fated LSD trip on an island of castaway rabbits to the devastating specter of HIV and AIDS.

This alchemy of photography and fiction gracefully illuminates the travesties and triumphs of the narrator’s quest to forge emotional connections and fulfill his brutal longings for love.

Advance Praise for And Every Day Was Overcast:

“And Every Day Was Overcast [is] unlike any book I’ve ever read. [It’s] a mix of this clean, spare, unaffected prose about growing up near the swamps of South Florida—plus these incredible photos [Paul has] taken of the area.… A completely original and clearheaded voice.”—Ira Glass, host of This American Life

“I can count on my fingers the number of great books that seamlessly mix photographs and literary text in a compelling way. Paul Kwiatkowski’s And Every Day is Overcast not only achieves this rare feat, he does so with an artistry that makes the achievement nearly invisible. As compelling as the best movies or graphic novels, And Every Day is Overcast is a landmark in visual storytelling.”—Alec Soth

"Paul Kwiatkowski stitches together an ugly-beautiful fabric of volatile America, threaded with gators and bad acid trips, swampy living and early sexual encounters. There's hardly anything more American than this ode to coming of age in South Florida. A tour de force in the form of battered scrapbook memories."—Doug Rickard

For sample pages, see here.

Publisher: Black Balloon Publishing

Paul Kwiatkowski
Paul Kwiatkowski’s arresting photographs amplify a novel of profound vision and vulnerability. Drugs, teenage cruelty, wonder, and the screen-flickering worlds of Predator and Married…With Children shape and warp the narrator’s developing sense of self as he navigates adventures and misadventures, from an ill-fated LSD trip on an island of castaway rabbits to the devastating specter of HIV and AIDS.
£21.25

Picture of Yoshino

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

'Ever since the day I saw the blossoming treetops in the Yoshino’s mountains, my heart has left my body behind', wrote the Japanese poet Saigyõ in the twelfth century. And even in those days, the area planted with over 30,000 cherry trees flanking the Yoshino Mountains must have been an awe-inspiring sight and make it an eloquent witness today to man’s harmonious design for luxuriant nature, so characteristic for Japan. For over 1,400 years, the temple, the mountain slopes and the river in Nara prefecture are thus part of the Spring cherry blossom season in the Buddhist pilgrim calendar; in former times, it was the preserve of the aristocracy, today Yoshino is a popular tourist attraction.

With 19 major cross-format photographs, Cuny Janssen has gathered together not only captivating and sensitive nature shots from Yoshino in her unusual book of photographs, but has also included a small anthology of Japanese poetry compiled by Jos Vos, which the Dutch Japan specialist rounds up with a travel essay, »A fox in Yoshino«. In a way rivalled by almost no other contemporary photographer, Cuny Janssen knows how to structure her books to suit the given topic – in Yoshino for example she increases the calm and contemplative mood of her photographs with a selection brittle poetry that celebrates of this site of Japanese longing.

Japanese texts (in English) compiled by Jos Vos

Publisher: Snoeck

Size: 340 x 455 mm

56 pages, 20 full page coloured illustrations and shortened text pages

Cuny Janssen
With 19 major cross-format photographs, Cuny Janssen has gathered together not only captivating and sensitive nature shots from Yoshino in her unusual book of photographs, but has also included a small anthology of Japanese poetry.
£49.50

Picture of Flowers of Evil

Publisher's Descriptio

Eikoh Hosoe’s platinum prints of strikingly rendered forms and sensuous embraces resonate with potent emotional power. This selection of classic images by Japan’s most revered photographer are united with the words of 19th century French poet Charles Baudelaire, a major influence on Hosoe. Baudelaire’s poems were said to have sent “a new shiver” through the art world, which is exactly what Eikoh Hosoe’s photographs did a century later. Presented in a hand crafted binding, Hosoe’s images and Baudelaire’s poems in a new translation by John Wood offer collectors an array of sensual and intellectual experiences.

Poems by Charles Baudelaire
Translated by John Wood
Afterword by Eikoh Hosoe

Publisher: 21st editions

Size: 18" x 15"

Edition of 65 numbered, 5 lettered, and 2 hors commerce copies

10 bound, plus 1 fully signed and free-standing, platinum prints

Handcrafted in the United States

Publisher's Price: $15000

Eikoh Hosoe
This selection of classic images by Japan’s most revered photographer are united with the words of 19th century French poet Charles Baudelaire, a major influence on Hosoe.
£8,750.00

Picture of Floating World

Publisher's Description

This book represents a unique realization of a conception for an artist’s book by photographer and poet Brigitte Carnochan, who couples her sensual approach to the subject of the nude with her selection of work by Japanese women poets both ancient and contemporary, to present an essential portrait of femininity. While her delicately tinted images derive from a very personal vision, Carnochan renders the universal in these photographs.

As John Wood notes in his introduction, “Carnochan’s is a life-affirming imagery reminiscent of Baudelaire’s 19th-Century Parisian floating world…."

See Brigitte Carnochan's website for sample images.

Publisher: Hudson Hills

Size: 250 x 280 mm

144 pages, 44 colour plates

Brigitte Carnochan
An elegant, evocative presentation of the artist’s masterful, delicate contemporary photographs in resonant combination with the poetry of Japanese women.
£31.50

Picture of Beat Memories The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

Publisher's Description

Now available in paperback, this intimate “family album” is a revealing photographic look at the Beat Generation as chronicled by the movement’s great poet, Allen Ginsberg.

Allen Ginsberg began photographing in 1953 when he purchased a small, secondhand Kodak camera. For the next 10 years he took photos of himself, friends, and lovers, including writers Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Gregory Corso as well as Beat personality Neal Cassady. He abandoned photography in 1963 and took it up again in the 1980s, when he was encouraged by Berenice Abbott and Robert Frank to reprint his earlier work and make new portraits; these included more images of longtime friends as well as acquaintances such as Larry Rivers, Francesco Clemente, and Bob Dylan. Ginsberg's photos form a compelling portrait of the Beat and counterculture generation from the 1950s to the 1990s. His photographs and the extensive inscriptions he added to them years later preserve what he referred to as “the sacredness of the moment,” the often joyous communion of friends and the poignancy of looking back to intensely felt times. More than 70 prints are brilliantly reproduced in this book, accompanied by an essay exploring Ginsberg's photography in relation to his poetry and other photographers of the time, a chronology of his photographic activity, and selections from an interview with Ginsberg in 1991.

Publisher: Prestel

Size: 230 x 300 mm

144 pages

Allen Ginsberg
Now available in paperback, this intimate “family album” is a revealing photographic look at the Beat Generation as chronicled by the movement’s great poet, Allen Ginsberg.
£22.49

Picture of Core Samples from the World

Pubisher's Description

Forrest Gander’s Core Samples from the World is a magnificent compendium of poetry, photography, and essay (a form of Japanese haibun). Collaborating with three acclaimed photographers, Gander explores tensions between the familiar and foreign. His eloquent new work voices an ethical concern for others, exploring empathic relations in which the world itself is fundamental. Taking us around the globe to China, Mexico, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Chile, Core Samples shows how Gander’s “sharp sense of place has made him the most earthly of our avant-garde, the best geographer of fleshly sites since Olson” (Donald Revell, The Colorado Review). 20 black-and-white photographs.

Praise…

“The reader is constantly surprised by what comes next — such as a side trip to Utopia, VA — and begins to crave the interruptions, which add freshness and energy to the work.”

— Elizabeth Lund, The Washington Post

“He brings the world’s frightening and beautiful strangeness far beyond the edge of the page.”

Critical Mass

“As a poet, reader, and translator, Gander dreams of the incipient vision opening to us from the other side of the consciousness, the muscular curtain drawn back from the beginning of dream.”

Chicago Review

Publisher: New Directions Publishing

Size: 156 x 225 mm

95 pages, 20 photographs

Forrest Gander (with photographs by Raymond Meeks, Garciela Iturbide and Lucas Foglia)
Forrest Gander’s Core Samples from the World is a magnificent compendium of poetry, photography, and essay.
£10.79

Picture of House of Coates

Publisher's Description

In House of Coates, writer Brad Zellar pieces together the story of legendary recluse Lester B. Morrison. Working from a handful of encounters and contradictory conversations, a sketchy paper trail and often confounding interviews with individuals who may or may not have been “associates” of Morrison (including Morrison’s former collaborator Alec Soth), Zellar attempts to reconstruct one episode from Morrison’s decidedly episodic life. In the winter of 2011, Zellar finally crossed paths with his evasive subject, and was –with Morrison’s permission– granted access to the results of an MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory) test that Morrison submitted to in August of 2009, along with the administrating psychiatrist’s copious notes. Finally, in late December of last year, Zellar received in the mail a duct-taped shoebox –marked “PERISHABLE”– containing almost two hundred photographs that Morrison termed “disposable documents of the approximate period in question.”

From these raw materials designer Hans Seeger has assembled a book that Morrison himself has pronounced, “Probably close enough to what might or might not have happened, and that’s as much as I’ve learned to expect from the so-called ‘real world.’”

Publisher: Little Brown Mushroom Books

Size: 6 3/4 x 8 3/4”

118 pages, 68 photographs


Brad Zellar with photos by Lester B. Morrison
In House of Coates, writer Brad Zellar pieces together the story of legendary recluse Lester B. Morrison. Working from a handful of encounters and contradictory conversations, a sketchy paper trail and often confounding interviews with individuals who may or may not have been “associates” of Morrison (including Morrison’s former collaborator Alec Soth).
£20.00

Picture of JOURNEYING 66

Publisher's Description

These photographs by Rosemarie Zens, a crossover-artist who works in both photography and literature, are testimonies to the legendary Route 66 and our collective memories of the 1960s way of life commonly associated with it. Over 40 years ago, Zens followed the siren call of freedom »on the road.« She then retraced her journey in 2010, witnessing how the highway had in the meantime been transformed into a kind of museum. Out of a mixture of private memories and allusions to social ideologies and media myths, the photographer has developed a unique pictorial language with which to express this experience. What interests her most is how the myths of the road can be related to one another – from image to reflection to image – to create a slightly absurdist, surreal and yet contemplative perspective.

»From the very beginning this question: is it possible to subvert a myth without ironically breaking it, to modify it with one’s own insertions? This myth – long an element of our collective memory – holds in our subconscious the images from John Steinbeck’s socially-critical novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) woven together into the all-American going on the road – there’s always something to find that is better, there is something new down the road, around the bend.«

See the photographer's website for spreads from the book.

Publisher: Kehrer Verlag

Size: 300 x 230 mm
96 pages
43 colour illustrations

Rosemarie Zens
These photographs by Rosemarie Zens, a crossover-artist who works in both photography and literature, are testimonies to the legendary Route 66 and our collective memories of the 1960s way of life commonly associated with it.
£28.99

Picture of Simonides
Publisher's Description
Published to coincide with an exhibition at Edinburgh College of Art as part of the 2011 Edinburgh Art Festival, Simonides (Easel Press, 2011) is a collaboration with one of the country’s leading poets, Robert Crawford, Professor of Modern Scottish Literature at the University of St Andrews. The book features twenty-five black and white, duotone photographs paired with texts translated from ancient Greek into Scots (and English) by Robert Crawford. The title is the name of an ancient Greek poet most known for his epitaphs and work to do with memory. BBC Radio 4 is broadcasting a programme in late November 2011 that is centred on Simonides and the collaboration between Robert Crawford and Norman McBeath.

A beautifully produced cloth-bound hardback with twenty-five duotone black and white photographs by Norman McBeath and texts by Robert Crawford. The book also contains Robert Crawford’s essay Simonides and the War on Terror.

You can view images from this book on the Norman McBeath website.

Publisher: Easel Press
Size: 250 x 245mm
72 pages, 25 duotone black and white photographs

Publisher's Price: £ 25.00
Norman McBeath
Publisher's Description
Published to coincide with an exhibition at Edinburgh College of Art as part of the 2011 Edinburgh Art Festival, Simonides (Easel Press, 2011) is a collaboration with one of the country’s leading poets, Robert Crawford, Professor of Modern Scottish Literature at the University of St Andrews. The book features twenty-five black and white, duotone photographs paired with texts translated from ancient Greek into Scots (and English) by Robert Crawford. The title is the name of an ancient Greek poet most known for his epitaphs and work to do with memory. BBC Radio 4 is broadcasting a programme in late November 2011 that is centred on Simonides and the collaboration between Robert Crawford and Norman McBeath.

A beautifully produced cloth-bound hardback with twenty-five duotone black and white photographs by Norman McBeath and texts by Robert Crawford. The book also contains Robert Crawford’s essay Simonides and the War on Terror.

You can view images from this book on the Norman McBeath website.

Publisher: Easel Press
Size: 250 x 245mm
72 pages, 25 duotone black and white photographs

Publisher's Price: £ 25.00
£25.00

Picture of Hard Ground
Publisher's Description
Michael O'Brien got out of his car one day in 1975 and sought the acquaintance of a man named John Madden who lived under an overpass. Their initial contact grew into a friendship that O'Brien chronicled for the Miami News, where he began his career as a staff photographer. O'Brien's photo essays conveyed empathy for the homeless and the disenfranchised and won two Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards. In 2006, O'Brien reconnected with the issue of homelessness and learned the problem has grown exponentially since the 1970s, with as many as 3.5 million adults and children in America experiencing homelessness at some point in any given year. In Hard Ground, O'Brien joins with renowned singer-songwriter Tom Waits, described by the New York Times as "the poet of outcasts," to create a portrait of homelessness that impels us to look into the eyes of people who live "on the hard ground" and recognize our common humanity. For Waits, who has spent decades writing about outsiders, this subject is familiar territory. Combining their formidable talents in photography and poetry, O'Brien and Waits have crafted a work in the spirit of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, in which James Agee's text and Walker Evans's photographs were "coequal, mutually independent, and fully collaborative" elements. Letting words and images communicate on their own terms, rather than merely illustrate each other, Hard Ground transcends documentary and presents independent, yet powerfully complementary views of the trials of homelessness and the resilience of people who survive on the streets.

"Other collections of lost souls (Richard Avedon's In the American West comes to mind) are different.... We meet O'Brien's people one on one. Their 'otherness' is removed. The photographs engender compassion and empathy. If that sounds simple, it is because it is simple. And, as you know, being simple is very, very difficult. Hard Ground is a rare and powerful book." — John Loengard, Life magazine photographer and picture editor, and one of American Photo magazine's "100 most influential people in photography"

"If I can think of a book to relate to this one, it would be James Agee and Walker Evans's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. That book was photographed in 1936—during the Great Depression—and published in 1941. It had an enormous influence—and still does—on the way photography and writing can work together as a catalyst for social change.... I think Hard Ground has this potential." — Mary Ellen Mark, internationally renowned photographer and author of sixteen books, including Seen Behind the Scene, Exposure, and Twins

You can view images from this book on the University of Texas Press website.

Publisher: University of Texas Press
Size: 9 x 11.75"
184 pages, 88 b&w photographs, 74 b&w thumbnails

Publisher's Price: £ 26.00
Photographs by Michael O’Brien, Poems by Tom Waits
Publisher's Description
Michael O'Brien got out of his car one day in 1975 and sought the acquaintance of a man named John Madden who lived under an overpass. Their initial contact grew into a friendship that O'Brien chronicled for the Miami News, where he began his career as a staff photographer. O'Brien's photo essays conveyed empathy for the homeless and the disenfranchised and won two Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards. In 2006, O'Brien reconnected with the issue of homelessness and learned the problem has grown exponentially since the 1970s, with as many as 3.5 million adults and children in America experiencing homelessness at some point in any given year. In Hard Ground, O'Brien joins with renowned singer-songwriter Tom Waits, described by the New York Times as "the poet of outcasts," to create a portrait of homelessness that impels us to look into the eyes of people who live "on the hard ground" and recognize our common humanity. For Waits, who has spent decades writing about outsiders, this subject is familiar territory. Combining their formidable talents in photography and poetry, O'Brien and Waits have crafted a work in the spirit of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, in which James Agee's text and Walker Evans's photographs were "coequal, mutually independent, and fully collaborative" elements. Letting words and images communicate on their own terms, rather than merely illustrate each other, Hard Ground transcends documentary and presents independent, yet powerfully complementary views of the trials of homelessness and the resilience of people who survive on the streets.

"Other collections of lost souls (Richard Avedon's In the American West comes to mind) are different.... We meet O'Brien's people one on one. Their 'otherness' is removed. The photographs engender compassion and empathy. If that sounds simple, it is because it is simple. And, as you know, being simple is very, very difficult. Hard Ground is a rare and powerful book." — John Loengard, Life magazine photographer and picture editor, and one of American Photo magazine's "100 most influential people in photography"

"If I can think of a book to relate to this one, it would be James Agee and Walker Evans's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. That book was photographed in 1936—during the Great Depression—and published in 1941. It had an enormous influence—and still does—on the way photography and writing can work together as a catalyst for social change.... I think Hard Ground has this potential." — Mary Ellen Mark, internationally renowned photographer and author of sixteen books, including Seen Behind the Scene, Exposure, and Twins

You can view images from this book on the University of Texas Press website.

Publisher: University of Texas Press
Size: 9 x 11.75"
184 pages, 88 b&w photographs, 74 b&w thumbnails

Publisher's Price: £ 26.00
£23.40

Picture of House of Love
Publisher's Description
House of Love is a work of photographic fiction that takes the form of nine short stories. (Click on the cover image above and scroll through the chapter Portrait of a Marriage.) Working closely with writer Aveek Sen, whose prose follows a journey of its own, Singh explores the relationship between photography, memory, and writing. House of Love, designed to blur the lines between an art book of photographic images and a work of literary fiction, is a book whose images demand to be read, not just seen, and whose texts create their own sensory worlds. The combination creates a new vocabulary for the visual book. The “House of Love” itself is the Taj Mahal, but the Taj Mahal as a recurring motif that stands for a range of meanings—meanings made up of the truths and lies of night and day, love and illusion, attachment and detachment. Through images of cities both visible and invisible, people real and surreal, Singh creates her own mysterious and ineffable, strange yet familiar language, using her trademark black-and-white photography and her newer nocturnal color work.

To preview the first chapter visit the Radius Books web page and click the book cover.

Publisher: Raduis Books
Size: 6.25 x 9.75'
198 pgs, 63 color and 48 black-and-white illustrations

Publisher's Price: $ 45
Dayanita Singh
Publisher's Description
House of Love is a work of photographic fiction that takes the form of nine short stories. (Click on the cover image above and scroll through the chapter Portrait of a Marriage.) Working closely with writer Aveek Sen, whose prose follows a journey of its own, Singh explores the relationship between photography, memory, and writing. House of Love, designed to blur the lines between an art book of photographic images and a work of literary fiction, is a book whose images demand to be read, not just seen, and whose texts create their own sensory worlds. The combination creates a new vocabulary for the visual book. The “House of Love” itself is the Taj Mahal, but the Taj Mahal as a recurring motif that stands for a range of meanings—meanings made up of the truths and lies of night and day, love and illusion, attachment and detachment. Through images of cities both visible and invisible, people real and surreal, Singh creates her own mysterious and ineffable, strange yet familiar language, using her trademark black-and-white photography and her newer nocturnal color work.

To preview the first chapter visit the Radius Books web page and click the book cover.

Publisher: Raduis Books
Size: 6.25 x 9.75'
198 pgs, 63 color and 48 black-and-white illustrations

Publisher's Price: $ 45
£35.14

Picture of Hervé Guibert - Photographien
Publisher's Description
French writer and photographer Hervé Guibert (b. 1955) died in 1991. Twenty years after his premature death the public interest in one of the most talented and versatile French artist is reawakening. A major retrospective exhibition in Paris presents the highlights of a photographic work that has lost none of its power, beauty, and impact. German edition. Schirmer/Mosel. With a text by Jean-Baptiste Del Amo. Translated from the French by Sophia Marzolff.

Publisher: Schirmer/Mosel
Size: 185 x 218 mm
224 pages, 210 duotone plates

Publisher's Price: £ 29.95
Hervé Guibert
Publisher's Description
French writer and photographer Hervé Guibert (b. 1955) died in 1991. Twenty years after his premature death the public interest in one of the most talented and versatile French artist is reawakening. A major retrospective exhibition in Paris presents the highlights of a photographic work that has lost none of its power, beauty, and impact. German edition. Schirmer/Mosel. With a text by Jean-Baptiste Del Amo. Translated from the French by Sophia Marzolff.

Publisher: Schirmer/Mosel
Size: 185 x 218 mm
224 pages, 210 duotone plates

Publisher's Price: £ 29.95
£26.96

Picture of TJ/Double Negative
Publisher's Description
A unique event in publishing: the work of a world-renowned photographer and a world-class novelist brought together in one collector's edition.

This publication is the product of the collaboration of two of the finest creative individuals at work in South Africa today, a photographer and a novelist, on a project that is the city of Johannesburg.

‘Johannesburg is a fragmented city. It is not a place of smoothly integrated parts. And it has a name that does not roll easily off the tongue.' So begins David Goldblatt's introduction to TJ, a book of photographs of Johannesburg: the City of Gold, Chowburg, eGoli, Jozi, Goutini, Duiwel's Dorp. Commencing in the 1950s, his masterful lens probes, documents and comments on life over six decades in this incomparable African city. Selected form a massive body of work, this superb distillation presents a unique pictorial history of the city.

A new novel by Ivan Vladislavic is the partner of the book of photographs, in a sleeved set beautifully produced in Italy, is. In Double Negative, a young man in Johannesburg receives from a senior photographer an induction into the intricate nature of photography and artistic representation. ‘If,' he says, ‘I try to imagine the lives going on in all these houses, the domestic dramas, the family sagas, it seems impossibly complicated. How could you ever do justice to something so rich in detail? You couldn't do it in a novel, let alone a photograph.' The novel traces the young man as he heads into his career that takes him overseas and back, developing in the process an ever widening perspective on not only the social and political change in the country but also on questions to do with observation and the observing subject. It brings into sharp focus the history of South Africa's recent past and the difficulty of imaging and re-imagining it.

You can view images from this book on the Umuzi website.

Publisher: Umuzi
Size: 280 x 270 mm

300 pages

Publisher's Price: $ 85
David Goldblatt and Ivan Vladislavic
Publisher's Description
A unique event in publishing: the work of a world-renowned photographer and a world-class novelist brought together in one collector's edition.

This publication is the product of the collaboration of two of the finest creative individuals at work in South Africa today, a photographer and a novelist, on a project that is the city of Johannesburg.

‘Johannesburg is a fragmented city. It is not a place of smoothly integrated parts. And it has a name that does not roll easily off the tongue.' So begins David Goldblatt's introduction to TJ, a book of photographs of Johannesburg: the City of Gold, Chowburg, eGoli, Jozi, Goutini, Duiwel's Dorp. Commencing in the 1950s, his masterful lens probes, documents and comments on life over six decades in this incomparable African city. Selected form a massive body of work, this superb distillation presents a unique pictorial history of the city.

A new novel by Ivan Vladislavic is the partner of the book of photographs, in a sleeved set beautifully produced in Italy, is. In Double Negative, a young man in Johannesburg receives from a senior photographer an induction into the intricate nature of photography and artistic representation. ‘If,' he says, ‘I try to imagine the lives going on in all these houses, the domestic dramas, the family sagas, it seems impossibly complicated. How could you ever do justice to something so rich in detail? You couldn't do it in a novel, let alone a photograph.' The novel traces the young man as he heads into his career that takes him overseas and back, developing in the process an ever widening perspective on not only the social and political change in the country but also on questions to do with observation and the observing subject. It brings into sharp focus the history of South Africa's recent past and the difficulty of imaging and re-imagining it.

You can view images from this book on the Umuzi website.

Publisher: Umuzi
Size: 280 x 270 mm

300 pages

Publisher's Price: $ 85
£61.50

Picture of Writing the Picture
'This book is among the most critically and financially risky of enterprises: a combination of the work of a well-known photographer with that of an equally well-known poet. Collaborators over the decades, David Hurn and John Fuller insist that neither of their work is intended to illustrate the other. Presumably, its role is to create a fresh synthesis that amounts to more than a sum of the parts, while acknowledging that both image and verse can stand alone. Much is down to how the combination works on the page. The format is traditional: each double-spread awards the verso to the poem and the recto to the photo, following the journalistic idiom that the reader's eye is always first drawn to the right-hand image.

Hurn, an Englishman living on the Welsh borders, has been documenting his adoptive homeland for the past 40 years. The majority of these beautifully reproduced black-and-white images date back to another Wales: that of miners, their faces stained black with coal, their teeth bared white as minstrels'; of the marching band that accompanied a rugby team, preceded by a shaggy dog and two kids racing a metal pram down the road; and a name-check of the most famed and favoured of Welsh poets, his curling photo-portrait in a café in the seaside village where Dylan Thomas wrote in his boathouse – as it were, a dual reference to both the poet and the photographer.

The words, provided by a poet who has spent long years as an Oxford academic, are often surprisingly populist and lyrical. The NUM banner on parade ('Mardy Lodge: Forward to Socialism') opens with a verse: 'I saw my valley taken/ For a bondman's wage./ When will we awaken?' The deliberate historicity of 'bondman' followed at once with the question, as much of the hymnal as a political slogan, could as well be sung. Lyricism abounds in another of Hurn's favourite subjects, a wild colt, arched white against the dark gorse, reframed by Fuller as: 'I dreamed a pony that could fly:/he suddenly looked up at me/With horizons in his eye'.

Deprivation, however, has less elegant aspects. The old sailor still squeezes his accordion, and is photographed with a bollard behind his shoulder, as if it were a lighthouse. But the young woman shooting up on bare floorboards beside a dirty lavatory bowl makes a clear statement: 'Don't any of you look at me./ I am not here'.

Perhaps the authors protest too much. After an initial discussion, included in the fascinating introduction, they concur that the specificity of a poem can only follow on that of the image, not the reverse. Either way, this brave volume offers a proud collaboration between two masters of their chosen arts.' As reviewed by Amanda Hopkinson for The Independent, August 2010

Publisher: Seren


Publisher's Price: £19.99
David Hurn & John Fuller
'This book is among the most critically and financially risky of enterprises: a combination of the work of a well-known photographer with that of an equally well-known poet. Collaborators over the decades, David Hurn and John Fuller insist that neither of their work is intended to illustrate the other. Presumably, its role is to create a fresh synthesis that amounts to more than a sum of the parts, while acknowledging that both image and verse can stand alone. Much is down to how the combination works on the page. The format is traditional: each double-spread awards the verso to the poem and the recto to the photo, following the journalistic idiom that the reader's eye is always first drawn to the right-hand image.

Hurn, an Englishman living on the Welsh borders, has been documenting his adoptive homeland for the past 40 years. The majority of these beautifully reproduced black-and-white images date back to another Wales: that of miners, their faces stained black with coal, their teeth bared white as minstrels'; of the marching band that accompanied a rugby team, preceded by a shaggy dog and two kids racing a metal pram down the road; and a name-check of the most famed and favoured of Welsh poets, his curling photo-portrait in a café in the seaside village where Dylan Thomas wrote in his boathouse – as it were, a dual reference to both the poet and the photographer.

The words, provided by a poet who has spent long years as an Oxford academic, are often surprisingly populist and lyrical. The NUM banner on parade ('Mardy Lodge: Forward to Socialism') opens with a verse: 'I saw my valley taken/ For a bondman's wage./ When will we awaken?' The deliberate historicity of 'bondman' followed at once with the question, as much of the hymnal as a political slogan, could as well be sung. Lyricism abounds in another of Hurn's favourite subjects, a wild colt, arched white against the dark gorse, reframed by Fuller as: 'I dreamed a pony that could fly:/he suddenly looked up at me/With horizons in his eye'.

Deprivation, however, has less elegant aspects. The old sailor still squeezes his accordion, and is photographed with a bollard behind his shoulder, as if it were a lighthouse. But the young woman shooting up on bare floorboards beside a dirty lavatory bowl makes a clear statement: 'Don't any of you look at me./ I am not here'.

Perhaps the authors protest too much. After an initial discussion, included in the fascinating introduction, they concur that the specificity of a poem can only follow on that of the image, not the reverse. Either way, this brave volume offers a proud collaboration between two masters of their chosen arts.' As reviewed by Amanda Hopkinson for The Independent, August 2010

Publisher: Seren


Publisher's Price: £19.99
£17.99

Picture of And the Land Lay Still

Anyone keeping up with the contemporary Scottish novel will know what a great writer James Robertson is. In his latest novel And the Land Lay Still, two of the leading characters are photographers. Michael Pendreich is curating an exhibition of photographs by his late, celebrated father Angus for the National Gallery of Photography in Edinburgh. The show will cover fifty years of Scottish life but, as he arranges the images and writes his catalogue essay, what story is Michael really trying to tell: his father's, his own or that of Scotland itself? The novel was very favourably reviewed by Irvine Welsh: “he maintains the pace and luminous prose that make his books such a joy to read. And the Land Lay Still is a wonderful novel, brilliant in a very different way from its acclaimed predecessor, The Testament of Gideon Mack. The book represents nothing less than a landmark for the novel in Scotland.”


Publisher: Penguin paperback
Size: 153 x 234 mm
688 pages

James Robertson
A great 'state of Scotland' novel with two photographers as protagonists.
£8.99

Picture of Photography Degree Zero - Reflections on Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida
Publisher's Description
Roland Barthes's 1980 book Camera Lucida is perhaps the most influential book ever published on photography. The terms studium and punctum, coined by Barthes for two different ways of responding to photographs, are part of the standard lexicon for discussions of photography; Barthes's understanding of photographic time and the relationship he forges between photography and death have been invoked countless times in photographic discourse; and the current interest in vernacular photographs and the ubiquity of subjective, even novelistic, ways of writing about photography both owe something to Barthes. Photography Degree Zero, the first anthology of writings on Camera Lucida, goes beyond the usual critical orthodoxies to offer a range of perspectives on Barthes's important book.

Photography Degree Zero (the title links Barthes's first book, Writing Degree Zero, to his last, Camera Lucida) includes essays written soon after Barthes's book appeared as well as more recent rereadings of it, some previously unpublished. The contributors' approaches range from psychoanalytical (in an essay drawing on the work of Lacan) to Buddhist (in an essay that compares the photographic flash to the mystic's light of revelation); they include a history of Barthes's writings on photography and an account of Camera Lucida and its reception; two views of the book through the lens of race; and a provocative essay by Michael Fried and two responses to it.

The variety of perspectives included in Photography Degree Zero, and the focus on Camera Lucida in the context of photography rather than literature or philosophy, serve to reopen a vital conversation on Barthes's influential work.

Publisher: MIT Press
Size: 22.9 x 19 x 2.3 cm
320 pages, 5 duotones

Publisher's Price: £22.95
Edited by Geoffrey Batchen
Publisher's Description
Roland Barthes's 1980 book Camera Lucida is perhaps the most influential book ever published on photography. The terms studium and punctum, coined by Barthes for two different ways of responding to photographs, are part of the standard lexicon for discussions of photography; Barthes's understanding of photographic time and the relationship he forges between photography and death have been invoked countless times in photographic discourse; and the current interest in vernacular photographs and the ubiquity of subjective, even novelistic, ways of writing about photography both owe something to Barthes. Photography Degree Zero, the first anthology of writings on Camera Lucida, goes beyond the usual critical orthodoxies to offer a range of perspectives on Barthes's important book.

Photography Degree Zero (the title links Barthes's first book, Writing Degree Zero, to his last, Camera Lucida) includes essays written soon after Barthes's book appeared as well as more recent rereadings of it, some previously unpublished. The contributors' approaches range from psychoanalytical (in an essay drawing on the work of Lacan) to Buddhist (in an essay that compares the photographic flash to the mystic's light of revelation); they include a history of Barthes's writings on photography and an account of Camera Lucida and its reception; two views of the book through the lens of race; and a provocative essay by Michael Fried and two responses to it.

The variety of perspectives included in Photography Degree Zero, and the focus on Camera Lucida in the context of photography rather than literature or philosophy, serve to reopen a vital conversation on Barthes's influential work.

Publisher: MIT Press
Size: 22.9 x 19 x 2.3 cm
320 pages, 5 duotones

Publisher's Price: £22.95
£20.66

Picture of Writing on the Edge - Great Contemporary Writers on the Front Line of Crisis
Publisher's Description
Powerful essays by such luminaries and literary giants as Daniel Day-Lewis and Martin Amis offer a compassionate look at the crises that most affect our world today.

An important book for anyone interested in global issues, Writing on the Edge features twelve essays that take the reader to countries in crisis. Award-winning writer Martin Amis experienced firsthand the problems of gang violence in Colombia, South America; New York Times bestselling author Tracy Chevalier focuses on the abuse of women in Burundi, East Africa; Oscar-winning actor Daniel Day-Lewis writes of meeting children raised in war-torn Palestine; Booker Prize–winning author DBC Pierre addresses the unusually high incidence of mental health issues in Armenia. Award-winning photographer Tom Craig was commissioned by the humanitarian charity Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders to document the writers in these places in trouble. His striking photographs amplify the sense of compassion required while also demonstrating that beautiful humanity is the victim of tragedy.

Publisher: Rizzoli
Size: 6 x 9'
276 pages, 150 - 200 illustrations

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
Edited by Dan Crowe, Photographed by Tom Craig
Publisher's Description
Powerful essays by such luminaries and literary giants as Daniel Day-Lewis and Martin Amis offer a compassionate look at the crises that most affect our world today.

An important book for anyone interested in global issues, Writing on the Edge features twelve essays that take the reader to countries in crisis. Award-winning writer Martin Amis experienced firsthand the problems of gang violence in Colombia, South America; New York Times bestselling author Tracy Chevalier focuses on the abuse of women in Burundi, East Africa; Oscar-winning actor Daniel Day-Lewis writes of meeting children raised in war-torn Palestine; Booker Prize–winning author DBC Pierre addresses the unusually high incidence of mental health issues in Armenia. Award-winning photographer Tom Craig was commissioned by the humanitarian charity Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders to document the writers in these places in trouble. His striking photographs amplify the sense of compassion required while also demonstrating that beautiful humanity is the victim of tragedy.

Publisher: Rizzoli
Size: 6 x 9'
276 pages, 150 - 200 illustrations

Usually dispatched within 10 working days
£19.95

Picture of Beat Memories - The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg
Publisher's Description
This intimate 'family album' is a revealing photographic look at the Beat Generation as chronicled by the movement's great poet Allen Ginsberg.

Allen Ginsberg began photographing in the late 1940s when he purchased a small, second-hand Kodak camera. For the next fifteen years he took photographs of himself, his friends, and lovers, including the writers and poets Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Gregory Corso as well as Beat personality Neal Cassady. He abandoned photography in 1963 and took it up again in the 1980s, when he was encouraged by photographers Berenice Abbott and Robert Frank to reprint his earlier work and make new portraits; these included more images of longtime friends as well other acquaintances such as painters Larry Rivers and Francesco Clemente and musician Bob Dylan. Ginsberg’s photographs form a compelling portrait of the Beat and counterculture generation from the 1950s to the 1990s. Far more than historical documents, his photographs and the extensive inscriptions he added to them years later preserve what he referred to as “the sacredness of the moment,” the often joyous communion of friends and the poignancy of looking back to intensely felt times. More than seventy prints are brilliantly reproduced in this book and accompanied by Sarah Greenough’s essay on Ginsberg’s photography in relation to his poetry and other photographers of the time, a chronology of his photographic activity, and selections from interviews with Ginsberg between 1958 and 1996.

Publisher: Prestel
Size: 240 x 280 mm
144 pages

This title will usually be dispatched within 2 days
Sarah Greenough
Publisher's Description
This intimate 'family album' is a revealing photographic look at the Beat Generation as chronicled by the movement's great poet Allen Ginsberg.

Allen Ginsberg began photographing in the late 1940s when he purchased a small, second-hand Kodak camera. For the next fifteen years he took photographs of himself, his friends, and lovers, including the writers and poets Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Gregory Corso as well as Beat personality Neal Cassady. He abandoned photography in 1963 and took it up again in the 1980s, when he was encouraged by photographers Berenice Abbott and Robert Frank to reprint his earlier work and make new portraits; these included more images of longtime friends as well other acquaintances such as painters Larry Rivers and Francesco Clemente and musician Bob Dylan. Ginsberg’s photographs form a compelling portrait of the Beat and counterculture generation from the 1950s to the 1990s. Far more than historical documents, his photographs and the extensive inscriptions he added to them years later preserve what he referred to as “the sacredness of the moment,” the often joyous communion of friends and the poignancy of looking back to intensely felt times. More than seventy prints are brilliantly reproduced in this book and accompanied by Sarah Greenough’s essay on Ginsberg’s photography in relation to his poetry and other photographers of the time, a chronology of his photographic activity, and selections from interviews with Ginsberg between 1958 and 1996.

Publisher: Prestel
Size: 240 x 280 mm
144 pages

This title will usually be dispatched within 2 days
£29.99

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