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Picture of An error has occurred

Publisher’s Description

An error has occurred is the major new book project by Melbourne-based photographer Rohan Hutchinson. The publication is based around a core series of large-format photographs that Hutchinson took during an expedition to the Arctic in early 2017. The focus of the expedition was to record and document the beauty, immensity and diversity of the Arctic landscape in this particular moment. Upon returning to Australia, Hutchinson set about reinterpreting and expanding the scope of resulting photographs in a bid to respond to the impact of climate change on the Arctic region and address our responsibilities not just as Australians, but as global citizens.

The final works comprise of two components. The first is a series of large-format photographs that capture the beauty, enormity, tonality and specificity of the winter landscape. The second is a series of physical and chemical reworkings of these photographic prints. Executed in Australia, this series saw Hutchinson re-sensitise the original C-type photographs with photographic emulsion liquid and expose them to the harsh Australian sun. Paired with their originals, the works reveal a ravaged, blackened arctic landscape. The works act as both a poignant allegory for the global resonance of our actions and as a précis on the limits and potentials of the photographic medium, taking Hutchinson’s research-based practice to new creative terrains in the process.

Publisher: Perimeter Editions

Size: 295 x 235 mm

48 pages

Edition of 700

Rohan Hutchinson
An error has occurred is the major new book project by Melbourne-based photographer Rohan Hutchinson. The publication is based around a core series of large-format photographs that Hutchinson took during an expedition to the Arctic in early 2017.
£40.00
£39.00

Picture of Jubilee

Publisher’s Description

The photobook Jubilee consists of works by Japanese photographer Mayumi Hosokura taken between 2012 and 2017. Taken in East Asian countries like Japan, Taiwan, China and more, Hosokura’s images depict fragments of urban and rural landscapes, nude bodies, surfaces, textures, details and shapes.

“The extraordinary skill and view to depict the delicate and fragile beauty of the subject matter has been acknowledged to be one of the most talented Japanese female photographers of our age.[…] sometimes through the natural light or color filters, all the images are treated equally, yet transforming and being reborn within a very quiet but heated rhythm and beat underneath.”

Publisher: ArtBeat Publishers

Size: 290 × 215 mm

108 pages

Mayumi Hosokura
The photobook Jubilee consists of works by Japanese photographer Mayumi Hosokura taken between 2012 and 2017. Taken in East Asian countries like Japan, Taiwan, China and more, Hosokura’s images depict fragments of urban and rural landscapes, nude bodies, surfaces, textures, details and shapes.
£34.20

Picture of The Big Cloud

Publisher’s Description

Our culture is addicted to weather: hourly forecasts, apps, radio, TV channels, alerts, warnings, and watches. And understandably---our food, clothing, livelihoods, and, increasingly, safety are tied directly to the weather and climate change. In The Big Cloud, photographer Camille Seaman stands in front of tornados, at the edges of lightning storms, and in pelting hail under pitch-black skies to capture supercells and mammatus clouds in their often sublime and terrifying splendor. In these awe-inspiring photographs, Seaman's work is a potent reminder that there is no art more dramatic, in scale or emotion, than that created by nature. The Big Cloud includes an introduction by award-winning New Yorker science writer and author Alan Burdick (Out of Eden, Why Time Flies).

Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press

Size: 254 × 203 mm

176 pages, 125 color illustrations

Camille Seaman
In The Big Cloud, photographer Camille Seaman stands in front of tornados, at the edges of lightning storms, and in pelting hail under pitch-black skies to capture supercells and mammatus clouds in their often sublime and terrifying splendor.
£27.00

Picture of Drowned River

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher’s Description

In 1963 the waters began rising behind Glen Canyon Dam and 170 miles of the Colorado River slowly disappeared as the riverbed and surrounding canyons filled with water. Those who supported and those who opposed the dam considered it a longterm transformation; environmentalists mourned Glen Canyon as dead and gone forever. But it’s coming back, in a victory that is also the pervasive disaster of climate change. There isn’t enough water in our new age, and so the world that drowned half a century ago is reappearing. Byron Wolfe, Mark Klett, and Rebecca Solnit spent half a decade exploring the place as expectations and possibilities changed and the river reemerged at the upper end of the reservoir. What they found is here in photographs and words.

“Lake Powell and the wreckage of where it used to be and will never be again was the right place to think about the madness of the past and the terror of the future, even amidst the epiphanies of beautiful light and majestic space,” Solnit writes. “We came to know the flat blue water the hard sunlight bounced off, the green water in shallower places, the water that turned red with the dust storms washed down from the sandstone landscape, the roiling waters of Dirty Devil Creek pushing a wall of debris downstream after a deluge, the clear little streams and waterfalls in the side canyons whose lively movement died in the placid lake.”

Their starting point was Eliot Porter’s landmark book of color photography, The Place No One Knew: Glen Canyon the Colorado, published by the Sierra Club in 1963 as a political statement about what had been lost under the dam’s waters and why it should never happen again. Their ending point is the reemergence of the river and the rise of questions about climate, the fate of the southwest, the folly of human endeavors to control nature, and the possibility of seeing these places and problems in new ways. Like previous collaborative work using historic images, Klett and Wolfe retrace the physical locations where Porter made his photographs, now mostly submerged by the lake’s waters, often as deep as 400 feet beneath the surface. Unlike previous projects, this work is not a rephotographic examination of his earlier sites or scenes; by necessity, this effort involves making entirely new images in response to the original Porter works. Solnit’s accompanying text meditates on meanings and histories, drawing from both the trio’s explorations of the place and archival research.

Drowned River is a book about climate change, but also about how photography can describe beauty and trouble simultaneously, about depth and shallowness, about what it takes to understand a place and to come to terms with the enormous scale of the changes we have set in motion.

Introduction by Michael Brune

Essay by Rebecca Solnit

Publisher: Radius Books

Size: 11.25 x 13”

212 pages, 80 images

Mark Klett & Byron Wolfe
Drowned River is a book about climate change, but also about how photography can describe beauty and trouble simultaneously, about depth and shallowness, about what it takes to understand a place and to come to terms with the enormous scale of the changes we have set in motion.
£56.95
£55.75

Picture of Vanishing Vernacular: Western Landmarks

Publisher’s Description

Steve Fitch is among America's most well-known chroniclers of the American West since the days of Easy Rider. He has been photographing examples of the West's changing vernacular landscape and vanishing roadside landmarks for more than 40 years. In his new book, he presents both the ancient and the modern by way of petroglyphs, neon motel signs and hand-painted business signs, drive-in movie theater screens, and radio and cell towers. All of them are now endangered because of the advent of the Interstate Highway System and corporate franchises.

In this fascinating and comprehensive account, we are able to join in Fitch's expansive journey, truly an odyssey, as represented in the book's 120 unforgettable photographs, all sequenced to mimic the open road—both during day and night. Fitch explains the project in his informative introduction, in which, interestingly, he suggests that the petroglyphs of the ancient Pueblo people have endured far better and longer than anything made during the last sixty years. Curator Toby Jurovics, in his insightful concluding essay, positions Fitch's work in relation to that of the practitioners of the photographic style known as the "New Topographics” and Fitch's own view of photography as a visual form of cultural anthropology.

Vanishing Vernacular: Western Landmarks is sure to become a modern-day classic, a book that will be all the more revered as America and Americans move farther away from the highways of the past. That economy and roadside culture are vanishing like endangered species, but Fitch was along for the ride. In sharing that past, he has been witness to his own form of historic preservation.

Publisher: George F. Thompson

Size: 10.0" x 11.875"

119 colour photographs and 11 color illustrations, including 2 gatefolds

Steve Fitch
Steve Fitch is among America's most well-known chroniclers of the American West since the days of Easy Rider. He has been photographing examples of the West's changing vernacular landscape and vanishing roadside landmarks for more than 40 years.
£27.00

Picture of Being There

Publisher’s Description

After “Roadside Lights”, Eiji Ohashi’s next photographic exploration of the ubiquitous vending machines and the role they play in Japanese society.

“After snowfall, especially when driving in the north during snowstorms, sometimes the light from the vending machines helps me find my way. In these moments, the vending machines along the roadsides remind me of the hatted Jizō.” — Eiji Ohashi

"The “hatted Jizō” mentioned by Ohashi appear in a well-known Japanese folk tale. A poor but kind-hearted old man gives up the last of his bamboo hats to protect Jizō figures (buddhist statues) on the roadside from falling snow, and is then richly rewarded for his kindness.
Ohashi’s photography brings out a strong sense of presence in the vending machines which, like the Jizō statues, cannot act of their own will. His snowy landscapes, lit only by the light of the vending machines, are particularly beautiful. The nightly snow scenes, taken when everyone else has sunk into sleep, invite their viewers into a world of deep thought. Looking at his images of vending machines standing in fields or in the middle of a town, we become aware of their human elements, their patient endurance of loneliness.
In Ohashi’s monochromatic images, weaved only of light and shadow, the individuality of each vending machine emerges further, breathing new life into an everyday sight." — from TOP Museum curator Kazuko Sekiji’s afterword

Publisher: Case Publishing

Size: 225 x 297 mm

88 pages, 60 images

Eiji Ohashi
After “Roadside Lights”, Eiji Ohashi’s next photographic exploration of the ubiquitous vending machines and the role they play in Japanese society.
£47.00

Picture of Last Diamonds

Publisher’s Description

Francesco Bosso presents his latest photographic work documenting with stunning black-and-white images the dramatic melting of the icebergs in the Arctic.

The “Global Warming” is devouring the glaciers of the Earth. As the author explains: “While touring around the Arctic borders, I have felt strong emotions, the fluidity of such a natural beauty is unsettling. You can immediately perceive the fragility and disaster in progress. Although the Arctic is so far away, it really is the thermometer of the Earth, therefore, it is important that people become more aware of the unfortunate consequences of global warming.” Inspired by the aggravating damage of environmental pollution, Last Diamonds aims to denounce the melting of glaciers due to climate change. In light of such issues, the photographer would like to offer his contribution to stop the melting of glaciers and to encourage the public to adhere to an ethic of Conservation of Nature. The images document the beauty of the Arctic through the emblematic icons of the biggest icebergs, which let the viewers think about the unique characteristics of such sites. Icebergs now becoming increasingly rare, precious jewels of nature at risk of extinction. Although they have a short life, sometimes just a few weeks, they are as majestic as rocky mountains, unavoidably beaten and sculpted by wind and water, creating new shapes unabated.

Publisher: Skira

Size: 294 x 294 mm

84 pages, 25 colour illustrations

Francesco Bosso
Francesco Bosso presents his last photographic work documenting with stunning black-and-white images the dramatic melting of the icebergs in the Artic.
£35.96

Picture of Forest

Publisher’s Description

Planting trees, you put down roots. And what about those who dig them up? In 2013, during a long-term photography project along the Yangtze river, Yan Wang Preston (*1976) made an incisive observation: in the small village of Xialiu stood an over three-hundred-year-old tree in all of its glory, right in the center of a community that was, at the time of Yan’s visit, being coerced into moving so that a dam could be built in that location. Three months later, no trace of the village or the tree could be seen. The residents had moved up the mountain. And the seventy-ton tree? It was sold for ten thousand American dollars to a hotel in the nearest large city, Binchuan. Yan found the tree, divested of all its branches and leaves and bandaged in plastic, inside the skeleton of the hotel, which was still under construction—like a living sculpture that has yet to become cognizant of its new surroundings. In China, the country where cities are springing up, transplanting nature is big business. In the photo series Forest Yan tracks down many uprooted creatures that are now in concrete deserts, once again questioning our sense of the meaning of homeland.
 
Publisher: Hate Cantz

Size: 300 x 260 mm

128 pages, 60 illustrations

Yan Wang Preston
On the trail of tree migration
£40.50

Picture of Mountain Interval

Publisher’s Description

The latest project from New York–based photographer Renate Aller includes mountain peaks from six continents. These photographs were taken from locations as high as 22,500 feet (adjacent to Mount Everest) to the European glaciers and mountain peaks of her childhood vacations. The subject matter is monumental, yet the images connect the viewer in a way that is not overpowering. Similar to the sand dune images from Ocean | Desert (Radius, 2014), the artist engages us with these giants in all their detail, the veins and textures of the rocks in their constantly transient state. Aller isolates the mountain from its expected surroundings, using and presenting the familiar and the known in an intimate way, relating to parallel realities from different locations, opening up conversations between the different (political) landscapes in which we live.

Publisher: Radius Books

Size: 14.25 x 10.25”

124 pages, 64 colour images

Photography by Renate Aller Essay by Terrie Sultan
The latest project from New York–based photographer Renate Aller includes mountain peaks from six continents.
£48.00
£47.00

Picture of The Rhodes Project: The Shadow of Ghosts

Publisher’s Description

The island of Rhodes has been important since ancient times. Famed worldwide for the Colossus, one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, its history has been one of occupation under many different rulers including the Romans, the Knights Hospitaller, the Ottoman Empire, Italy and most recently, during the Second World War, the German Army. Finally in 1947 after a short period of British control it again became a part of Greece. Today it is a popular holiday destination: every visitor has their own photographs and their own stories to tell.

Through marriage John Comino-James has direct personal links to the island, and in The Rhodes Project he revisits photographs preserved in old family albums and sets them against his own recent images. In his text he explores the presence of the Knights Hospitaller, their defeat at the hands of the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, and the arrival of the Italians as victors of the Italo-Turkish War. He also reflects on Operation Anglo and The Guns of Navarone, the former a reality of war, the latter a fiction filmed in Rhodes.

Comino-James reflects on the island’s importance in the complex ethnic and cultural heritage of his children and grandchildren and the way in which the spirits of our forebears inform our lives, and how the histories that shaped them shape us too. The Rhodes Project is a walk in the shadow of ghosts.

If you look deeply into the palm of your hand, you will see your parents and all generations of your ancestors… that you are the continuation of each of these people. (Thich Nhat Hanh).

Born in Somerset, John Comino-James lives near Thame in Oxfordshire. He has published eight previous books of photographs and has exhibited his work in the UK and in Cuba.

Publisher: Dewi Lewis Publishing

Size: 240mm x 195mm

160 pages, 30 archive photographs 78 colour photographs

John Comino-James
Comino-James reflects on the island’s importance in the complex ethnic and cultural heritage of his children and grandchildren and the way in which the spirits of our forebears inform our lives, and how the histories that shaped them shape us too. The Rhodes Project is a walk in the shadow of ghosts.
£27.00

Picture of Gap in the Hedge (Special Edition)

Publisher's Description

Built in 1928, ’Bwlch-y-Clawdd’ (Gap in the Hedge) is a mountain pass (450m) that connects the Rhondda Valley - In South Wales - to the town where I was born and still live, Bridgend. It is also connected to the Afan Valley via the A4107, which leads through to the coastline and industrial town of Port Talbot. The Bwlch road itself is the A4061, which stretches approximately 25 miles.

Not only did the pass offer a lifeline to the isolated valleys, and present greater job opportunities for the local people but it also provided an essential shortcut for valley based industry; predominantly coal related. My parents used the pass themselves to make their own move to Bridgend in 1966; starting their own business there shortly after.

Loosely based around nostalgia, ‘Gap in the Hedge’ reflects on a journey I used to make with my Mother to visit relatives in the Rhondda Valley, every Saturday when I was a small boy. It was my first taste of a road trip and I can recall almost every inch of the journey. I’d sit there in the front seat of my Mother’s little red car utterly absorbed and mesmerised by the forests, terraced houses and falling rock warning signs. The journey seemed to take forever, but we were only ever around 30 minutes from home.

This series not only attempts to document the beauty of this iconic piece of South Wales landscape, but also explores the relationship that the people - whether locals, tourists or workers - have with the landscape and environment. And ultimately, what lies ahead for this part of South Wales following Brexit and the abolition of EU funding. The immediate villages of Nantymoel and Cwmparc - both of which are former mining communities - either side of the mountain, are incorporated into the project, as the pair both sit in the shadow of ‘The Bwlch’.

Special Edition with signed limited edition print - £80.00

Special Edition limited to 50 copies.

Signed & numbered digital print approx 230 x 210mm

Publisher: Another Place Press

Size: 250 x 200mm

132 pages

Dan Wood
"Built in 1928, ’Bwlch-y-Clawdd’ (Gap in the Hedge) is a mountain pass (450m) that connects the Rhondda Valley - In South Wales - to the town where I was born and still live, Bridgend..."
£80.00

Picture of London Nights

Publisher's Description

In the glow of the night, the vibrancy of London meets a quiet stillness.

This collection of historic and contemporary images features work from over 60 photographers who reveal the city after hours: unnerving, beautiful, eerie, energised – sometimes all at once. Step into the night and discover a darker, richer side to the capital.

The book contains essays by Museum of London’s Curator of Photographs, Anna Sparham, poetry by award-winning poet and playwright Inua Ellams, and over 100 images from the exhibition that span the genres of architectural, documentary and portrait photography. Includes work by Bill Brandt, Bob Collins, Brian Griffin, Tish Murtha, Tim Peake, Rut Blees Luxemburg, William Eckersley, Dougie Wallace, Nick Turpin and many more.

Publisher: Hoxton Mini Press

Size: 228 x 173 mm

208 pages


In the glow of the night, the vibrancy of London meets a quiet stillness.
£17.96

Picture of Mount St. Helens: Afterlife

Publisher's Description

In the most recent publication in the LiberArs series, Mount St. Helens: Afterlife, David Maisel invites us to explore the ruins that remain after an act of savage and inescapable destruction: the eruption of a volcano. The book is a reflection on nature’s capacity for regeneration through violence and destruction. As Marcia Bjornerund says in the essay that accompanies Maisel’s photographs, ‘Its story is no longer merely about death and devastation but also, paradoxically, survival and resilience’.

Publisher: Ivory Press

Size: 150 x 105 mm

143 pages

David Maisel
David Maisel invites us to explore the ruins that remain after an act of savage and inescapable destruction: the eruption of a volcano. The book is a reflection on nature’s capacity for regeneration through violence and destruction.
£39.75
£38.95

Picture of The Older Industrial Parks

Publisher's Description

In 1974, Lewis Baltz’s seminal work, “The New Industrial Parks Near Irvine, California”, explored a common American theme (the promised land defiled) in an uncommon place. For Baltz, industrial parks were a new phenomenon which would “cause severe dislocations in the local economy”. He was interested in “the effect of this kind of urbanism … Was it a world people could live in? Really?”

The Australian landscape rarely elicits such blatant anger. Our notion of landscape seems very different. Baltz documented the short term impact of money on place, while Lane’s project explores the mildly subversive impact of people after the event (more erosion than explosion), transforming Baltz’s stark Californian minimalism into an ethereal antipodean nocturne.

Lane and Baltz’s aims seem different, and yet, they are very much connected. Both projects are rooted in an exploration of place and time, there and here, then and now, Lane and Baltz.

Bill Lane was born in Melbourne in 1962. He was a finalist in 1992’s Felix H. Mann Memorial Prize at the National Gallery of Victoria and was acquired as part of the Hugh Williamson bequest for inclusion in “Sites of the Imagination”. His 1996 project “Shades” was included in the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art’s “The Object of Existence”  and subsequently in Chris McAuliffe’s book “Art and Suburbia”.

Includes essay written by Sean Payne.

Publisher; Velvet Cell

Size: 240 x 175 mm

64 pages

Limited Edition of 500

Bill Lane

Publisher's Description

In 1974, Lewis Baltz’s seminal work, “The New Industrial Parks Near Irvine, California”, explored a common American theme (the promised land defiled) in an uncommon place. For Baltz, industrial parks were a new phenomenon which would “cause severe dislocations in the local economy”. He was interested in “the effect of this kind of urbanism … Was it a world people could live in? Really?”

The Australian landscape rarely elicits such blatant anger. Our notion of landscape seems very different. Baltz documented the short term impact of money on place, while Lane’s project explores the mildly subversive impact of people after the event (more erosion than explosion), transforming Baltz’s stark Californian minimalism into an ethereal antipodean nocturne.

Lane and Baltz’s aims seem different, and yet, they are very much connected. Both projects are rooted in an exploration of place and time, there and here, then and now, Lane and Baltz.

Bill Lane was born in Melbourne in 1962. He was a finalist in 1992’s Felix H. Mann Memorial Prize at the National Gallery of Victoria and was acquired as part of the Hugh Williamson bequest for inclusion in “Sites of the Imagination”. His 1996 project “Shades” was included in the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art’s “The Object of Existence”  and subsequently in Chris McAuliffe’s book “Art and Suburbia”.

Includes essay written by Sean Payne.

Publisher; Velvet Cell

Size: 240 x 175 mm

64 pages

Limited Edition of 500

£30.00

Picture of New American Topographics

Publisher's Description

Iñaki Bergera’s enthusiasm for modern architecture shines through his entire oeuvre. Form, shape and volume are the key elements of his landscapes, shaped by industrial transformation and urban life.

However, his huge capacity for observation and his sense of astonishment allow him to show details that would otherwise go unnoticed and emphasise the intimate essence of places, as he transforms the most trivial things into something unknown and unexpected.

Bergera’s photographs might be universal, even neutral, but their content clearly speaks of North America in the new millennium. He surprises us with humorous remarks and associative games, showing the beauty of a parking lot, or the expressive strength of a row of mailboxes.

Iñaki Bergera (Vitoria, Spain, 1972) is a Spanish architect, photographer, researcher and professor. His interest in contemporary urban and hybrid landscapes and buildings has lead him to produce an intensive and coherent oeuvre displayed at several solo exhibitions.

Publisher: La Fabrica

Size: 160 x 245 mm

98 pages, 56 images

Language: English / Spanish

Iñaki Bergera
A poetic search for North American landscape as shaped by industrial growth and urban life
£25.20

Picture of Green Lungs of the City (Signed with print)

Publisher's Description

British artist Simon Roberts was invitated to collaborate on a new book with Pierre Bessard, ‘Green Lungs of the City’ is the result.

Special edition of 250 copies (with a signed C-tyoe print)

Simon Roberts
Special edition of 250 copies (with a signed C-tyoe print)
£42.00

Picture of Cloven Landscape

Publisher's Dsecription

Rather than a mere reproduction of the works featured, the exhibition catalogue Cloven Landscape (published in July 2017) provides a documentation and critical examination of Naoya Hatakeyama’s 2016 show “Cloven Landscape” at Sendai Mediatheque.

The book is split into two halves, each 128 pages long. The “text” part features a dialogue with Hatakeyama, essays and examinations by writers and artists Mikiro Sasaki, Mikio Igarashi, Lieko Shiga and Takahiro Nishimura. The “photography” part consists, of course, of images used in the exhibition, but also, curiously, of photos taken by Hatakeyama of the exhibition itself. Additional information, such as a detailed list of the exhibited works, a map of the exhibition space and commentary on his works (in Japanese) by Hatakeyama complete the catalogue.

Publisher: akaaka-sha

Size: 235 x 180 mm

248 pages

Language: English, Japanese

Naoya Hatakeyama
Rather than a mere reproduction of the works featured, the exhibition catalogue Cloven Landscape (published in July 2017) provides a documentation and critical examination of Naoya Hatakeyama’s 2016 show “Cloven Landscape” at Sendai Mediatheque.
£38.00

Picture of Excavating the Future City

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

For the past thirty years, Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama has undertaken a photographic examination of the life of cities and the built environment. Each of his series focuses on a different facet of the growth and transformation of the urban landscape—from studies of architectural maquettes to the extraction and use of natural materials such as limestone, as it is quarried via explosive blasts and subsequently incorporated into the construction of new buildings. In particular, Hatakeyama has routinely returned to the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolis, exploring this ever-evolving urban sprawl from both below and above, mapping the growth and expansion of these sites over time. Additional series focus on other forms of human intervention with the landscape and natural materials, including factories and building sites in Japan and abroad. Finally, his most recent photographs of his hometown of Rikuzentakata, a fishing town that was almost completely destroyed by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, are also included—an ongoing series begun almost immediately following the disaster. These photographs hauntingly embody the death and rebirth of the city, manifesting a deeply personal connection to the ongoing intersection of geology, architecture, and time.

Essay and coedited by Yasufumi Nakamori Contributions by Toyo Ito and Philippe Forest

Publisher: Co-published by Aperture and the Minneapolis Institute of Art

Size: 222 x 296 mm

280 pages, 160 black-and-white and four-color image

Naoya Hatakeyama
For the past thirty years, Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama has undertaken a photographic examination of the life of cities and the built environment.
£45.00

Picture of Pipeline Iceland/Alaska

Publisher's Description

Gentaro Ishizuka began to travel around the world and photograph landscapes when he was in his teens. Since learning about the etymology of the word "photography," according to which it combines the natural element of "photo" (sun, light) and the artificial operation of "graphy" (depiction), Ishizuka has been creating his works based on the concept and method of such "coexistence of contradicting aspects."

"PIPELINE ICELAND/ALASKA," traces the inorganic "artifact" of a pipeline that runs over 1,200 kilometers in Iceland and Alaskan, also awarded The 30th Higashikawa Award Winners – New Photographer Award (2014).

Publisher: euphoria FACTORY

Size: 320 x 250 mm

128 pages


Gentaro Ishizuka
"PIPELINE ICELAND/ALASKA," traces the inorganic "artifact" of a pipeline that runs over 1,200 kilometers in Iceland and Alaska, also awarded The 30th Higashikawa Award Winners – New Photographer Award (2014).
£26.30

Picture of Stained Ground

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Ominous, overwhelming, and harshly lit at night—Korean photographer Taewon Jang (1976 in Seoul) puts industrial plants at the center of his work. He documented abandoned steel factories, nuclear reactors, cooling towers, storage containers, or briskly working oil refineries to depict the traces of humans’ effort to survive in modern era. Residential buildings seem tiny in comparison, and the overall scale has obviously shifted.
Jang prefers to show us these industrial landscapes in the gray of the dawn, or the red of dusk, by moonlight, in fog or snow; sometimes he shifts a gnarled tree into the foreground, but despite—or perhaps precisely because of—these potentially romantic, idyllic topoi, the viewer senses an uncanny, apocalyptic mood. Large, apparently deserted industrial plants dominate the horizon, yet moving backhoes, cranes, and conveyor belts give the impression they might have a hazardous life of their own.

Contributions by Suejin SHIN, graphic design by Andreas Platzgummer, ed. Suejin SHIN, Markus Hartmann

Publisher: Hatje Cantz

Size: 310 x 255 mm

168 pages, 77 illustrations

Taewon Jang
Industrial plants: cathedrals of the modern era
£32.50
£12.59

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