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Picture of Trilogy

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Publisher's Description

Trilogy, by Lu Nan draws together three series of the photographer’s work created over the course of 15 years; The Forgotten People, a haunting study of the living conditions of China’s psychiatric patients, On the Road, a document of the daily lives of Catholics in China and Four Seasons, a chronicle of the lives of rural peasants in Tibet. Collectively, the projects are part of one major work presenting three stages of inner life – suffering, purification and peace of heart. Previously only published in his native China, this is the first English language publication of the renowned photographer’s work.

In 1989, Lu Nan began work on The Forgotten People, and over the course of two years visited nearly 40 mental institutions across ten provinces and major cities, alongside individual family homes. There is a stigma surrounding mental illness in China and the result of this is a lack of trained medical professionals and a deeply inadequate healthcare system, with families often taking the responsibility for care. The photographs are often difficult to view but Lu Nan balances the harsh conditions with moments of tenderness and humanity, aiming to document those cast aside by the mainstream with a careful and honest empathy.

The second section of the book On the Road, depicts the lives of Catholic believers in China. During the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966–76), the demonstration of religious life was forbidden in China—worshippers were arrested, imprisoned, and sometimes tortured for their devotion, Catholic homes were raided and Bibles were confiscated. This series was created between 1992 and 1996 when Lu Nan visited over one hundred churches and religious pilgrimages to document believers. The images focus on how the Catholics practice love and faith in daily life beyond the physical building of a church, and the lives of a population dedicated resolutely to their faith in the face of discrimination and hardship.

The final section of the book, Four Seasons draws upon Lu Nan’s photographs of the daily lives of Tibetan peasants whose livelihoods depend on the whims of mother nature. This series was made over the course of seven years and nine separate trips, with Lu Nan often living with farmers and their families, to capture the rural existence through harsh unforgiving winters, planting season and autumn’s harvest.

Publisher: GOST BOOKS

Size: 210 x 290 mm

400 pages, duotone throughout

Lu Nan
Trilogy, by Lu Nan draws together three series of the photographer’s work created over the course of 15 years; The Forgotten People, a haunting study of the living conditions of China’s psychiatric patients, On the Road, a document of the daily lives of Catholics in China and Four Seasons, a chronicle of the lives of rural peasants in Tibet.
£90.00

Picture of Sunday: a Portrait of 21st Century England

Publisher's Description

A 128 page photographic book documenting twelve different Sundays from a variety of backgrounds across England.

Sundays evolve as we age; our childhood memories are often held dear and as adults, we associate Sunday with the chance to relax and switch off from work and the world.

However, the last few decades have seen a huge shift away from traditional churchgoing, while consumerism and digital culture have changed the way we use our time. So what impact have these changes had on our ability to relax and be with ourselves? And how does the way we spend our leisure time reflect the nature of society in 21st century England?

This book provides the reader with the opportunity to pause and reflect on what value they place on their leisure time in an ever increasingly fast paced world.

Matt Writtle
This book provides the reader with the opportunity to pause and reflect on what value they place on their leisure time in an ever increasingly fast paced world.
£27.00

Picture of Small World (Signed)

Publisher's description

First published in 1996 Small World is one of the most popular and most important of Martin Parr’s books. This revised and extended edition includes more than 40 new photographs as well as featuring many of Martin Parr’s most iconic images.

It is a biting, very funny satire in which Parr looks at tourism worldwide, exposing the increasingly homogenous ‘global culture’ where in the search for different cultures those same cultures are destroyed. The issues that Parr raised two decades ago when the book was first published are even more relevant today.

Whilst Parr’s larger-than-life troupe of tourists appear willing participants in an omnipresent consumer culture they are also bemused victims – at the mercy of larger social forces and locked into their insatiable craving for spectacle. Small World‘s citizens become a symbol of western society’s prosperous freedoms, declaring their power and their rights to travel, to choose and to consume.

A member of the prestiguous MAGNUM photo agency Martin Parr is one of the best known photographers in the world today. He has published innumerable books and his work has been exhibited and published worldwide

Introduced by Geoff Dyer

Publisher: Dewi Lewis Publishing

Size: 24 x 29.5 cm

80 colour photographs, 104 pages

Martin Parr
First published in 1996 Small World is one of the most popular and most important of Martin Parr’s books. This revised and extended edition includes more than 40 new photographs as well as featuring many of Martin Parr’s most iconic images.
£30.00

Picture of Displaced: Manzanar 1942–1945 | The Incarceration of Japanese Americans

Publisher's description


Edited by Evan Backes. Foreword by Pico Iyer. Introduction by Nancy Matsumoto.


"This sorry episode has been illuminated in books and documentaries. But I've never felt its emotional texture—the unexpected mix of dereliction and upstanding hopefulness—so vividly as in this set of photographs taken by Ansel Adams and Dorothea Lange and five others, among them an artist incarcerated at Manzanar." –Pico Iyer

In the weeks following the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, American suspicion and distrust of its Japanese American population became widespread. The US government soon ordered all Japanese Americans (two thirds of them American citizens) living on the West Coast to report to assembly centers for eventual transfer to internment camps, openly referred to by the New York Times as "concentration camps." Within a few months of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066; soon after, the War Relocation Authority (WRA) was established and by the end of March, the first of 10,000 Japanese evacuees arrived in Manzanar, an internment camp in the Owens Valley desert at the foot of the Sierras. Families were given one to two weeks' notice and were allowed to pack only what they could carry. Businesses were shuttered and farms and equipment were sold at bargain prices. Upon arrival at Manzanar, each person was assigned to a barrack, given a cot, blankets and a canvas bag to be filled with straw in order to create their own mattresses.

Dorothea Lange was hired by the WRA to photograph the mass evacuation; she worked into the first months of the internment until she was fired by WRA staff for her "sympathetic" approach. Many of her photographs were seized by the government and largely unseen by the public for a half century. More than a year later, Manzanar Project Director Ralph Merritt hired Ansel Adams to document life at the camp. Lange and Adams were also joined by WRA photographers Russell Lee, Clem Albers and Francis Stewart. Two Japanese internees, Toyo Miyatake and Jack Iwata, secretly photographed life within the camp with a smuggled camera.

Gathered together in this volume, these images express the dignity and determination of the Japanese Americans in the face of injustice and humiliation. Today the tragic circumstances surrounding displaced and detained people around the world only strengthen the impact of these photos taken 75 years ago.

Publisher: T. Adler Books
Size: 9.25 x 8.75"

176 pages, 160 black & white illustrations


ISBN 9781942884293

Edited by Evan Backes. Foreword by Pico Iyer. Introduction by Nancy Matsumoto.
Gathered together in this volume, these images express the dignity and determination of the Japanese Americans in the face of injustice and humiliation.
£38.50
£37.75

Picture of Across the Cut

Publisher's description

Krass Clement’s new work stems from a short visit he made to Bristol in June 2016. He had been invited to speak at Photobook Bristol and also to discuss a potential future publishing project. He had not planned this book but it developed during his stay. Unlike many of his other works, he started editing and sequencing his images as soon as he returned to Denmark. The time in Bristol coincided with the run-up to the UK referendum on future membership of the European Union. The notion that Britain may leave the EU troubled Krass Clement  deeply, and no doubt it influenced his mood and perception as he was taking the photographs.

The ambiguities of being left behind, loneliness, feelings of limbo and powerlessness are present in all of Krass Clement’s books and are not place-specific, but nonetheless few show this as powerfully as his images around Bristol’s Cut.

The Cut is an artificially constructed waterway which was built in the early 19th Century to help to create a floating harbour. It is about 3 kilometers long and divides Bristol, with the traditionally more affluent part being located on the North side. Most of Krass Clement’s pictures were taken on the South side.

Publisher: RRB Photobooks

Size: 24 x 27 cm

136 pages

Krass Clement
Krass Clement’s new work stems from a short visit he made to Bristol in June 2016.
£45.00

Picture of Mongrelism

Publisher's description

The Mongrel Mob of Aotearoa New Zealand is notorious for extreme violence, and they have long been regarded as the nation’s monsters. In layers of apparent contradictions, their icon is the British bulldog wearing a Nazi helmet, while their members are largely indigenous Maori. The Mongrel Mob’s symbols arose as both a goading response to a history of colonial subjugation of Maori, and a proclamation of war against the (white) state.

‘Mongrelism’ offers a communion with this impenetrable fraternity. Monumental portraits illustrate Mob members’ assertion of membership and pride in their identity. Artefact studies and brutal first person narratives are drawn from the Mob corpus, mirroring the landscapes that bare the brooding environments where Mob members live. ‘Mongrelism’ examines how the gang brands itself to itself to uphold its hierarchy and history, and find core values usually lauded by society: perseverance, resilience, and loyalty.

The publication takes the form of a gang handbook. The order and grouping of images is the result of consultation with members and hews to their geographic, familial and hierarchical relationships. An unedited Mob voice dominates the written section.

Rotman’s images have become a part of Mob history and their visual mythology. Ongoing consultation and engagement has been integral.

Rotman is a fourth generation white New Zealander, his forebears were among the first to settle in the region that became the epicentre of the Mob genesis. The process of colonisation and the atomisation of indigenous communities can be argued to have resulted in the Mongrel Mob. In Mongrelism, as in the history of the nation, the narratives intertwine.

‘Mongrelism’ is the recipient of the Prix du Livre Images Vevey 2017/2018

Publisher: Here Press

Size: 205 x 260 mm

380 pages, 152 photographs

Edition of 1500
ISBN: 978–0–9935853–8–8

Jono Rotman
The publication takes the form of a gang handbook. The order and grouping of images is the result of consultation with members and hews to their geographic, familial and hierarchical relationships. An unedited Mob voice dominates the written section.
£36.00

Picture of 136, I am Rohingya

Publisher's Description

Saiful Huq Omi started to document the lives of the Rohingyas almost a decade ago and has showcased their stories in different parts of the world.

“136, I am Rohingya” honours the mission of strengthening the identity of the community that is being threatened and adds to its collective memory, shows its traditions, raises awareness, tells stories of abuse and tragedies. Ultimately, it shows an incredible commitment to the fight of these people and a level of humanity, so necessary in these of times of turbulence.

Saiful Huq Omi is a photographer, filmmaker, educator and activist. Founder of the photography school Counter Foto, he was born in Bangladesh in 1980. The recipient of multiple awards and grants, Omi’s work on the Rohingyas has won him a global reputation as a tireless campaigner for human rights.  

Publisher: Schildt Publishing

Size: 21 x 31.5 cm

156 pages with approx. 150 photographs in black & white


Saiful Huq Omi
Saiful Huq Omi started to document the lives of the Rohingyas almost a decade ago and has showcased their stories in different parts of the world.
£36.00

Picture of Lars Tunbjork

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

Initially inspired by Swedish masters such as Christer Strömholm, as well as Stephen Shore and William Eggleston, Lars Tunbjörk (1956–2015) was one of the great and truly original European photographers. Tunbjörk's international breakthrough came in 1993 with the photobook Country beside Itself. Celebrated by Martin Parr and Gerry Badger as "an acute observer of modern life," Tunbjörk's color images amplified the mundane and the absurd in a quietly surreal fashion using the hard light of flash photography, which became his signature style and influenced a subsequent generation of photographers. His best-known photobook series include Office (2001), which depicts office workers in bizarre chance positions, and Home (2003), in which everyday items such as flowers or armchairs are made to reveal a quiet absurdity in Swedish suburbia. With more than 250 images, this volume constitutes the most substantial overview of his work.

Text by Kathy Ryan, Göran Odbratt, Maud Nycander.

Publisher: Max Ström

Size: 11.5 x 10.5 "

336 pages, 220 colour/34 black & white images

Lars Tunbjork
Initially inspired by Swedish masters such as Christer Strömholm, as well as Stephen Shore and William Eggleston, Lars Tunbjörk (1956–2015) was one of the great and truly original European photographers.
£45.00

Picture of Women's Market

Publisher's Description

Between 1978 and 1999 British photographer Tom Wood spent his Saturday mornings at Great Homer Street Market, a retail market, just far enough outside the centre of Liverpool for it to have it’s own unique, more relaxed identity. Complete with his Leica and out of date film, Wood made vibrant and real photographs of the shoppers as they hunted for bargains and met up with friends and family.

“I was first introduced to Great Homer Street market in 1975, by a girlfriend with family in Dingle, Liverpool. At that time, I bought two double breasted Worsted wool three piece suits and a three buttoned pin stripe suit with turn ups, for a total of four pounds. I thought, “what a great market!” It was vast then down both sides of the street, but by the time I began to photograph the second-hand clothes had all but disappeared. Yet the market was still crowded with the same mothers and daughters who for generations had frequented “Greatie” - Tom Wood

 
Publisher: Stanley/Barker

Size: 24 x30 cm

104 pages, 66 images (Duotone + CMYK)

Tom Wood
Between 1978 and 1999 British photographer Tom Wood spent his Saturday mornings at Great Homer Street Market, a retail market, just far enough outside the centre of Liverpool for it to have it’s own unique, more relaxed identity.
£34.99

Picture of Players: Magnum Photographers Come Out to Play

Publisher's Description

In order to go beyond the rules and the veneration that have characterised the development of photography since its beginnings, it is necessary to transgress, to invent, to play and to flirt with freedom. In this sense, there haven’t historically been many authors who have dared to question the medium and turn it around, which confirms the impression that, as a language yet to be fully consolidated, photography hasn’t been in the mood for jokes. But there are always authors, specially in the newer generations, who break the rules without vindications, just out of curiosity, seeking to have and portray fun.

Revolving around this idea, Players—a volume to accompany the exhibition of the same name that will take place as part of the Festival PHotoEspaña 2018—presents a selection of woks by Magnum photographers that have a playful approach, either because they play with the photographic medium itself, or because they portray fun and leisure.

Photographers: Abbas, Christopher Anderson, Olivia Arthur. Bruno Barbey, Jonas Bendiksen, Ian Berry, Michael Christopher Brown, Cartier Bresson, Thomas Dworzak, Bruce Davidson, Karl de Keyzer, Raymond Depardon, Bieke Depoorter, Carolyn Drake, Elliott Erwitt, Martine Frank, Stuart Franklin, Leonard Freed, Cristina García Rodero, Bruce Gilden, Burt Glinn, Jim Goldberg, Harry Gruyaert, David Allan Harvey, David Hurn, Richard Kalvar, Hiroji Kubota, Guy Le Querrec, Erich Lessing, Alex Majoli, Peter Marlow, Steve Mc Curry, Susan Meiselas, Trent Parke, Martin Parr, Paolo Pellegrin, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Mark Power, Eli Reed, Marc Riboud, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Jerome Sessini, Jacob Aue Sobol, Alec Soth, Chris Steele Perkins, Dennis Stock, Matt Stuart, Mikhael Subotzky, Larry Towell, Peter Van Agtmael, Alex Webb, Patrick Zachmann.

Publisher: La Fabrica

Size: 21.4 x 25 cm

212 pages, 190 images

Language: English / Spanish


Editted by Cristina de Middel & Martin Parr
In order to go beyond the rules and the veneration that have characterised the development of photography since its beginnings, it is necessary to transgress, to invent, to play and to flirt with freedom.
£31.50

Picture of The Crash

Publisher's Description

In 2008 the financial crash hit the City of London. Panic filled the air and people working for the giant money machine seemed oblivious to a photographer working quickly and quietly in their midst. Now, over a decade later, these images question what we have learned... if anything at all.

Stephen McLaren moved to Bethnal Green in 1996, became a photographer, and quickly realised he never wanted to live anywhere else in London other than the East End. Stephen has written a number of books on photography, including 'Photographers’ Sketchbooks', and currently works as a photographer and writer in Los Angeles.

Book 14 from the series 'East London Photo Stories' + PRINT

A fully cloth-covered Collector's Edition of The Crash by Stephen McLaren, presented in a bespoke cloth-covered clamshell box complete with signed and numbered limited edition print.

This Collector's Edition is limited to 150 copies.

Edition numbers allocated from lowest to highest as orders are processed.

Publisher: Hoxton Mini Press

Stephen McLaren
A fully cloth-covered Collector's Edition of The Crash by Stephen McLaren, presented in a bespoke cloth-covered clamshell box complete with signed and numbered limited edition print.
£50.00

Picture of Public Matters (Signed)

Publisher's Description

Capturing the spirit of protest and parade, Public Matters brings together photographs made by Janet Delaney in Reagan-era San Francisco. At this turbulent time in the mid eighties, Delaney was living in the primarily Latino neighbourhood of the Mission District. She would spend the weekends photographing public gatherings, from the annual Cinco de Mayo parade, to the Peace, Jobs and Justice marches, which rallied against the U.S. invasion of Nicaragua. If political governance was regressing, the West Coast city was a place where, as Delaney remembers, ‘progressive ideas would always be upheld.’ Celebrating multiculturalism and collective struggles for social justice, Public Matters surfaces at a juncture when the message of building bridges is needed now more than ever.

In the vintage glow of her sun-drenched images, Delaney leads us in and out of crowds – among demonstrators, fair-goers, cross-dressers, union organisers, beauty pageants, dancers, salesmen, mothers, kids, and market punters – searching for as many intimate moments as she found collective voices. Fearlessly upbeat, her photographs nevertheless intimate a time when, as Delaney recollects, people ‘were reeling from the shift to a conservative government. The demands of the 1960s were addressed in the 70s: the end of the Vietnam war, women’s rights, environmental issues, gay rights, to name a few. Then when Reagan was elected all this came to a halt.’ And as soon as the streets were filled with placards – ‘babies are for loving, not for bombing’; ‘Hatred can never cure the disease of fear, only love can do that’ – Delaney was there, in the middle of the maelstrom, making pictures of public matters.

Essay by Nathan Heller

Publisher: Mack Books

Janet Delaney
Capturing the spirit of protest and parade, Public Matters brings together photographs made by Janet Delaney in Reagan-era San Francisco.
£30.00

Picture of Liberty Theater (Signed)

Publisher's Description

Liberty Theater by Rosalind Fox Solomon brings together her photographs made in the Southern United States from the 1970s to 1990s, never before published together as a group. Solomon’s images depict a complex terrain of social and emotional issues inherited over generations: a world of class and gender divisions, implied and overt racism, competing notions of liberty, and lurking violence. Journeying through Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and South California, Solomon draws attention to cultural idiosyncrasies, paradoxes and theatrical displays: a Daughter of the Confederacy sits in costume with a china doll from her collection; a dead tree stump, fenced and suspended with wires is elevated to the status of a Civil War monument; African American boys examine a vitrine of guns as two white police manikins loom behind them. Poised between act and re-enactment, the animate and the inanimate, Solomon’s images reveal how history becomes a vernacular performance and identity a form of theatre.

Publisher: Mack Books

128 pages, 77 tritone plates

Rosalind Fox Solomon
Liberty Theater by Rosalind Fox Solomon brings together her photographs made in the Southern United States from the 1970s to 1990s, never before published together as a group.
£30.00

Picture of New York

Publisher's Description

The starting point for Evelyn Hofer’s New York is the 1965 book New York Proclaimed, which features an in-depth essay by V. S. Pritchett and photos by Hofer, and enjoyed great popularity upon its original publication. New York Proclaimed is an example of Hofer’s perhaps most important body of work, her city portraits: books that present comprehensive prose texts by renowned authors alongside her self-contained visual essays with their own narratives. The newly conceived New York focuses on Hofer’s photos of the 1960s as well as until now unpublished images from the early 1970s.

In Hofer’s photos of the street and (semi-)public spaces, people and architecture become symbols of a particular time and place. She immersed herself in New York society and captured these aspects of the everyday—inconspicuous and subtle, yet all the more enduring for being so—in images that invariably reflect the zeitgeist. New York contains a new essay by John Haskell which posits possible stories behind Hofer’s photos and draws connections between images taken over the course of ten years.

Publisher: Steidl

Size: 21.5 x 28 cm

144 pages, 93 images

Evelyn Hofer
The starting point for Evelyn Hofer’s New York is the 1965 book New York Proclaimed, which features an in-depth essay by V. S. Pritchett and photos by Hofer, and enjoyed great popularity upon its original publication.
£36.00

Picture of The Quiet Pioneer

Publisher's Description

More often than not, when discussion turns to the pioneering days of modern photojournalism, a number of names instantly spring to mind; Cartier-Bresson, Brassai, Doisneau and Kertesz are just a handful who are synonymous with the genre. However, arguably one of the founding fathers of reportage is inevitably missing from the list. A man who was at the very forefront of this photographic revolution and who, like those mentioned above, did much to change the world of photography. Kurt Hutton – arguably every bit as influential and ground-breaking as his counterparts – did much to usher in the new era of photo-documentary and was one of an elite band of photojournalists to first utilize the Leica in Britain, fundamentally changing how we viewed our world in the process.

The ‘revelatory experience’ – when one comes across Kurt’s imagery for the first time – seems to be a regular occurrence and happened again recently with none other than the Leica company itself – needless to say, an exhibition is now touring Leica galleries across Europe as a result. It is baffling why Hutton is not mentioned in the same breath as those ‘greats’ listed above but after a hiatus of some 70 years since the last ‘Kurt Hutton’ book, we can at least take another small step in establishing Hutton as one of the true giants of 20th century photojournalism.

Publisher: Bluecoat Press

Size: 290 x 220mm

132 pages

Kurt Hutton
Kurt Hutton – arguably every bit as influential and ground-breaking as his counterparts – did much to usher in the new era of photo-documentary and was one of an elite band of photojournalists to first utilize the Leica in Britain, fundamentally changing how we viewed our world in the process.
£18.00

Picture of Birdmen (Signed)

Publisher's Description

Pigeon racing is a unique sport with its roots deep within traditional working-class communities. it thrived among Britain’s miners, shipbuilders and iron and steel workers.

Reaching its peak by the early 1970s with over 2,000 societies and 130,000 members, as the decade progressed and heavy industries collapsed, communities were torn apart and the number of Birdmen fell to under 60,000.

Zak Waters realised that the sport was changing and began documenting the fast-dwindling community with all its humour, anxieties and passion. Birdmen is his record of the slow death of a culture that has changed almost beyond recognition.

Rod Adams, legendary writer on all things pigeon, has contributed witty and insightful stories about the sport and the characters that made it so special.

Publisher: Bluecoat Press

Size: 270 x 290mm

156 pages

Zak Waters
Pigeon racing is a unique sport with its roots deep within traditional working-class communities. it thrived among Britain’s miners, shipbuilders and iron and steel workers.
£25.00

Picture of Japan Somewhere

Publisher's Description

This latest publication by French photographer Maki includes images taken between 2001 and 2015 during many visits to Japan. The high-contrast black-and-white photos, from streetsnaps to portraits, landscapes and the occasional erotic image, paint a manifold picture of Maki’s extensive experience of Japan while avoiding the common mistake of needless orientalism.

Says Russet Lederman in her essay “A Journey to Japan Somewhere”: “Maki approaches photography as a series of open-ended encounters experienced from both inside and outside Japanese culture. (...) "Japan Somewhere" travels both figuratively and literally into Japan’s back alleys.”

Publisher: Zen Foto Gallery

Size: 280 x 195 mm

144 pages, 96 images

Language: English, Japanese

Edition: 500

Maki
This latest publication by French photographer Maki includes images taken between 2001 and 2015 during many visits to Japan
£53.00

Picture of Housing Plans for the Future

Publisher's Description

This is the latest of Donovan Wylie’s books with Steidl that explore the architecture of the Northern Ireland conflict. While Wylie’s earlier publications including British Watchtowers and Maze (on Belfast’s Maze prison) document disappearing military structures, Housing Plans for the Future focuses on the legacy of architectural containment in urban areas today.

Wylie took these photos during walks through a number of social-housing neighborhoods in inner-city Belfast, which look eerily similar. While the built environments at first appear benign, even mundane, sustained looking reveals how they purposely control vision and movement. Walls block vehicle access, houses are inverted to face away from neighboring communities and minimize potential antagonism, and excessive street lighting ensures visibility in what Wylie calls “a prison of sorts … a completely thought-through system of social control.” These defensive structures, built in the 1970s and ’80s and still populated today, are a powerful and largely unrecognized legacy of the Northern Ireland conflict.

Publisher: Steidl

Size: 29.5 x 23 cm

80 pages

Donovan Wylie
This is the latest of Donovan Wylie’s books with Steidl that explore the architecture of the Northern Ireland conflict.
£27.00

Picture of Depardon USA

Publisher's Description

Photographer, writer and director, Raymond Depardon seems to have had a thousand lives. One of them took place in the United States, where he returned several times throughout his career. He went to photograph, for magazines or for himself, key moments of history but also more contemplative landscapes, emblematic of the American continent. This book, which brings together for the first time all these photographs, accompanies the eponymous exhibition presented at the Rencontres d'Arles from July 2 to September 23, 2018

Publisher: Editions Xavier Barral

180 pages, 76 photogarphs

Raymond Depardon
This book accompanies the eponymous exhibition presented at the Rencontres d'Arles 2018
£36.00
£35.25

Picture of The Sweet Flypaper of Life

Publisher's Description

“The people in these photographs had no walls up. They just accepted me and permitted me to take their photographs without any self-consciousness.” —Roy DeCarava

The Sweet Flypaper of Life is a “poem” about ordinary people, about teenagers around a jukebox, about children at an open fire hydrant, about riding the subway alone at night, about picket lines and artist work spaces. This renowned, life-affirming collaboration between artist Roy DeCarava and writer Langston Hughes honors in words and pictures what the authors saw, knew, and felt deeply about life in their city.

Hughes’s heart-warming description of Harlem in the late 1940s and early 1950s is seen through the eyes of one grandmother, Sister Mary Bradley. As she guides the reader through the lives of those around her, we imagine the babies born, families in struggle, children yet flourishing. We experience the sights and sounds of Harlem as seen through her learned and worldly eyes, expressed here through Hughes’s poetic prose. As she states, “I done got my feet caught in the sweet flypaper of life and I’ll be dogged if I want to get loose.” DeCarava’s photographs lay open a world of sense and feeling that begins with his perception and vision. The ruminations go beyond the limit of simple observation and contend with deeper meanings to reveal these individuals as subjects worthy of art. While Hughes states “We’ve had so many books about how bad life is, maybe it’s time to have one showing how good it is,” the photographs bring us back to this lively dialogue and a complex reality, to a resolution that stands with the optimism of the photographic medium and the certainty of DeCarava’s artistic moment.

In 1952 DeCarava became the first African American photographer to win a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. The one-year grant enabled DeCarava to focus full time on the photography he had been creating since the mid-1940s and to complete a project that would eventually result in The Sweet Flypaper of Life, a moving, photo-poetic work in the urban setting of Harlem. DeCarava compiled a set of images from which Hughes chose 141 and adeptly supplied a fictive narration, reflecting on life in that city-within-a-city. First published in 1955, the book, widely considered a classic of photographic visual literature, was reprinted by public demand several times. This fourth printing, the Heritage Edition, is the first authorized English-language edition since 1983 and includes an afterword by Sherry Turner DeCarava tracing the history and ongoing importance of this book.

Publisher: First Print Press

Size: 127 × 184 mm

108 pages, 141 black & white images

Roy DeCarava
This renowned, life-affirming collaboration between artist Roy DeCarava and writer Langston Hughes honors in words and pictures what the authors saw, knew, and felt deeply about life in their city.
£28.80

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