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Picture of James Ravilious: A Life

Publisher's Description

JAMES RAVILIOUS (1939–99) trained as an artist, like his father Eric, but a Cartier-Bresson exhibition converted him to photography, which he taught himself. In 1972, a move to his wife Robin’s homeland – a very rural, unspoilt part of North Devon – inspired him. It also produced the perfect job: recording daily life in that traditional bit of old England before it was modernised. He devoted himself to this for more than seventeen years. The results, over 75,000 black-and-white negatives in the Beaford Archive, form what Barry Lane, Secretary General of the Royal Photographic Society, called ‘a unique body of work, unparalleled at least in this country for its scale and quality’.

James was a friendly, modest man with a very unintrusive approach. Because of this, and because of the length of the project, he was able to make a uniquely detailed portrait, intimate and sympathetic, of a whole way of life in one small piece of countryside: its landscapes, its seasons, its people, their hardships and their pleasures.

His respect for his subjects is manifest in his work. He never sentimentalised their lives. It was vital to him that his record should be completely honest. But it is not merely social history. It is also the work of someone who composed with the eye of an artist, and who often looked at his world with artists such as Breughel, Claude Lorrain, Thomas Bewick and Samuel Palmer in mind.

Robin Ravilious was closely involved in James’s work from the start, often travelling with him, and working on his books and exhibitions. She shared his love of country life, and understood what inspired him. She has drawn a picture of an engaging, eccentric and gifted man whose warmth and enthusiasm made him friends wherever he went.


Publisher: Bitter Lemon Press

248 pages

Robin Ravilious

Publisher's Description

JAMES RAVILIOUS (1939–99) trained as an artist, like his father Eric, but a Cartier-Bresson exhibition converted him to photography, which he taught himself. In 1972, a move to his wife Robin’s homeland – a very rural, unspoilt part of North Devon – inspired him. It also produced the perfect job: recording daily life in that traditional bit of old England before it was modernised. He devoted himself to this for more than seventeen years. The results, over 75,000 black-and-white negatives in the Beaford Archive, form what Barry Lane, Secretary General of the Royal Photographic Society, called ‘a unique body of work, unparalleled at least in this country for its scale and quality’.

James was a friendly, modest man with a very unintrusive approach. Because of this, and because of the length of the project, he was able to make a uniquely detailed portrait, intimate and sympathetic, of a whole way of life in one small piece of countryside: its landscapes, its seasons, its people, their hardships and their pleasures.

His respect for his subjects is manifest in his work. He never sentimentalised their lives. It was vital to him that his record should be completely honest. But it is not merely social history. It is also the work of someone who composed with the eye of an artist, and who often looked at his world with artists such as Breughel, Claude Lorrain, Thomas Bewick and Samuel Palmer in mind.

Robin Ravilious was closely involved in James’s work from the start, often travelling with him, and working on his books and exhibitions. She shared his love of country life, and understood what inspired him. She has drawn a picture of an engaging, eccentric and gifted man whose warmth and enthusiasm made him friends wherever he went.


Publisher: Bitter Lemon Press

248 pages

£15.29

Picture of Vivian Maier: A Photographer’s Life and Afterlife

Publisher's Description

Who was Vivian Maier? Many people know her as the reclusive Chicago nanny who wandered the city for decades, constantly snapping photographs, which were unseen until they were discovered in a seemingly abandoned storage locker. They revealed her to be an inadvertent master of twentieth-century American street photography. Not long after, the news broke that Maier had recently died and had no surviving relatives. Soon the whole world knew about her preternatural work, shooting her to stardom almost overnight.
 
But, as Pamela Bannos reveals in this meticulous and passionate biography, this story of the nanny savant has blinded us to Maier’s true achievements, as well as her intentions. Most important, Bannos argues, Maier was not a nanny who moonlighted as a photographer; she was a photographer who supported herself as a nanny. In Vivian Maier: A Photographer’s Life and Afterlife, Bannos contrasts Maier’s life with the mythology that strangers—mostly the men who have profited from her work—have created around her absence. Bannos shows that Maier was extremely conscientious about how her work was developed, printed, and cropped, even though she also made a clear choice never to display it. She places Maier’s fierce passion for privacy alongside the recent spread of her work around the world, and she explains Maier’s careful adjustments of photographic technique, while explaining how the photographs have been misconstrued or misidentified. As well, Bannos uncovers new information about Maier’s immediate family, including her difficult brother, Karl—relatives that once had been thought not to exist.
 
This authoritative and engrossing biography shows that the real story of Vivian Maier, a true visionary artist, is even more compelling than the myth.

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Size: 6 x 9"

352 pages, 30 halftones

Vivian Maier
This authoritative and engrossing biography shows that the real story of Vivian Maier, a true visionary artist, is even more compelling than the myth.
£23.85

Picture of  American Witness | The Art and Life of Robert Frank

Publisher's Description 

From the author of the acclaimed James Brown biography The One comes the first in-depth biography of renowned photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank, best known for his landmark book The Americans.

As well-known as Robert Frank the photographer is, few can say they really know Robert Frank the man. Born and raised in wartime Switzerland, Frank discovered the power and allure of photography at an early age and quickly learned that the art meant significantly more to him than the money, success, or fame. The art was all, and he intended to spend a lifetime pursuing it.

American Witness is the first comprehensive look at the life of a man who's as mysterious and evasive as he is prolific and gifted. Leaving his rigid Switzerland for the more fluid United States in 1947, Frank found himself at the red-hot social center of bohemian New York in the '50s and '60s, becoming friends with everyone from Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and Peter Orlovsky to photographer Walker Evans, actor Zero Mostel, painter Willem de Kooning, filmmaker Jonas Mekas, Bob Dylan, writer Rudy Wirlitzer, jazz musicians Ornette Coleman and Charles Mingus, and more. Frank roamed the country with his young family, taking roughly 27,000 photographs and collecting 83 of them into what is still his most famous work: The Americans. His was an America nobody had seen before, and if it was harshly criticized upon publication for its portrait of a divided country, the collection gradually grew to be recognized as a transformative American vision.

And then he turned his back on certain success, giving up photography to reinvent himself as a film and video maker. Frank helped found the American independent cinema of the 1960s and made a legendary film with the Rolling Stones. Today, the nonagenarian is an embodiment of restless creativity and a symbol of what it costs to remain original in America, his life defined by never repeating himself, never being satisfied. American Witness is a portrait of a singular artist and the country that he saw.

Publisher: Da Capo

320 pages

R J Smith
The first in-depth biography of renowned photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank, best known for his landmark book The Americans.
£24.29

Picture of Avedon: Something Personal

Publisher's Desription

An intimate biography of Richard Avedon, the legendary fashion and portrait photographer who “helped define America’s image of style, beauty and culture” (The New York Times), by his longtime collaborator and business partner Norma Stevens and award-winning author Steven M. L. Aronson.



Richard Avedon was arguably the world’s most famous photographer—as artistically influential as he was commercially successful. Over six richly productive decades, he created landmark advertising campaigns, iconic fashion photographs (as the star photographer for Harper’s Bazaar and then Vogue), groundbreaking books, and unforgettable portraits of everyone who was anyone. He also went on the road to find and photograph remarkable uncelebrated faces, with an eye toward constructing a grand composite picture of America.



Avedon dazzled even his most dazzling subjects. He possessed a mystique so unique it was itself a kind of genius—everyone fell under his spell. But the Richard Avedon the world saw was perhaps his greatest creation: he relentlessly curated his reputation and controlled his image, managing to remain, for all his exposure, among the most private of celebrities.



No one knew him better than did Norma Stevens, who for thirty years was his business partner and closest confidant. In Avedon: Something Personal—equal parts memoir, biography, and oral history, including an intimate portrait of the legendary Avedon studio—Stevens and co-author Steven M. L. Aronson masterfully trace Avedon’s life from his birth to his death, in 2004, at the age of eighty-one, while at work in Texas for The New Yorker (whose first-ever staff photographer he had become in 1992).



The book contains startlingly candid reminiscences by Mike Nichols, Calvin Klein, Claude Picasso, Renata Adler, Brooke Shields, David Remnick, Naomi Campbell, Twyla Tharp, Jerry Hall, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Bruce Weber, Cindy Crawford, Donatella Versace, Jann Wenner, and Isabella Rossellini, among dozens of others.



Avedon: Something Personal is the confiding, compelling full story of a man who for half a century was an enormous influence on both high and popular culture, on both fashion and art—to this day he remains the only artist to have had not one but two retrospectives at the Metropolitan Museum of Art during his lifetime. Not unlike Richard Avedon’s own defining portraits, the book delivers the person beneath the surface, with all his contradictions and complexities, and in all his touching humanity.

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

Size: 6 1/8  x 9 1/4"

720 pages

Norma Stevens and Steven M. L. Aronson
An intimate biography of Richard Avedon, the legendary fashion and portrait photographer who “helped define America’s image of style, beauty and culture” (The New York Times), by his longtime collaborator and business partner Norma Stevens and award-winning author Steven M. L. Aronson.


£0.00

Picture of Gene Smith’s Sink

Publisher's Description

Famously unabashed, W. Eugene Smith was photography’s most celebrated humanist. As a photo essayist at Life magazine in the 1940s and ’50s, he established himself as an intimate chronicler of human culture. His photographs of war and disaster, villages and metropolises, doctors and midwives, revolutionized the role of images in journalism, transforming photography for decades to come.

When Smith died in 1978, he left behind eighteen dollars in the bank and forty-four thousand pounds of archives. He was only fifty-nine, but he was flat worn-out. His death certificate read “stroke,” but, as was said of the immortal jazzman Charlie Parker, Smith died of “everything,” from drug and alcohol benders to weeklong work sessions with no sleep.

Lured by the intoxicating trail of people that emerged from Smith’s stupefying archive, Sam Stephenson began a quest to trace his footsteps. In Gene Smith’s Sink, Stephenson merges traditional biography with rhythmic digressions to revive Smith’s life and legacy. Traveling across twenty-nine states, Japan, and the Pacific, Stephenson profiles a lively cast of characters, including the playwright Tennessee Williams, to whom Smith likened himself; the avant-garde filmmaker Stan Brakhage, with whom he once shared a Swiss chalet; the artist Mary Frank, who was married to his friend Robert Frank; the jazz pianists Thelonious Monk and Sonny Clark, whose music was taped by Smith in his loft; and a series of obscure caregivers who helped keep Smith on his feet. The distillation of twenty years of research, Gene Smith’s Sink is an unprecedented look into the photographer’s potent legacy and the subjects around him.

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux 

Size: 5.7 x 8.5"

224 pages

Sam Stephenson
An incisive biography of the prolific photo-essayist W. Eugene Smith
£24.00

Picture of A Wild Life: A Visual Biography of Photographer Michael Nichols

Overseas deliveries  Please note that, as this is a heavy item, overseas postage will be charged at twice our standard rates.

Publisher's Description

“Menaced by lizards in Indonesia, cuffed by a gorilla in Africa, stung by poisonous caterpillars in the world’s deepest cave”—so ran the lead to a 1985 article describing Michael “Nick” Nichols.

A Wild Life is Michael “Nick” Nichols’s story, told with passion and insight by author and photo-editor Melissa Harris. Nichols’ story combines a life of adventure, with a conviction about how we can redeem the human race by protecting our wildlife. The book’s two central characters are the photographer—who journeys from the American South, via the photographers’ co-operative Magnum, to becoming lead wildlife photographer of National Geographic magazine—and the author, who travels with the photographer on assignment in Africa, to gain intimate and deep insight into her subject. Harris’s story also draws on meetings with some of the world’s leading eco-scientists—including legendary primatologist, Jane Goodall.

Publisher: Aperture

Size: 7 1/2 x 10"

350 pages, 150 four-color and black-and-white image

Melissa Harris (Photographs by Michael Nichols)
A Wild Life is Michael “Nick” Nichols’s story, told with passion and insight by author and photo-editor Melissa Harris. Nichols’ story combines a life of adventure, with a conviction about how we can redeem the human race by protecting our wildlife.
£22.50

Picture of Dora Maar: Paris in the Time of Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, and Picasso

Publisher's Description

An exquisite volume on the beautiful, talented, and mysterious Dora Maar, showcasing her Surrealist photography, her life with Pablo Picasso, and her friendships with Surrealists in 1930s Paris.

Highly regarded as a Surrealist photographer in the 1930s, Dora Maar was a fellow student with Henri Cartier-Bresson and friends with Brassaï, Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, and André Breton, the charismatic leader of the Surrealists.

When Maar met Picasso in the mid-1930s, she became the most influential of his many muses, inspiring much of what is considered to be his best work. But during the ten years they were together, she abandoned her career as an acclaimed professional photographer and instead photographed Picasso, including her famous series of him painting Guernica.

While Maar was considered an influential Surrealist photographer, most of her work vanished from the public eye once she stopped creating it in the late 1930s. Now, this volume restores her photographs to their place in history, featuring a treasure trove of incredible and never-before-published images.

An important look at Surrealist photography, Dora Maar is also beautifully illustrated with photographs celebrating Maar’s friendships with leading artists and intellectuals of the day, such as Georges Bataille (Maar’s former lover), glamorous Nusch Éluard and her husband, the poet Paul Éluard, and arts patron and hostess Marie-Laure de Noailles, evoking the atmosphere of 1930s and ’40s artistic Paris.

"In the skilled hands of art writer Louise Baring, the book heroically restores Maar’s photographs to their place in history, featuring never-before-published images, many from the Pompidou Museum in Paris, that showcase the magnitude of her photographic talent." ArtDaily.org

Publisher: Rizzoli

Size: 8 x 10


Louise Baring
An exquisite volume on the beautiful, talented, and mysterious Dora Maar, showcasing her Surrealist photography, her life with Pablo Picasso, and her friendships with Surrealists in 1930s Paris.
£38.25

Picture of A Photographer's Life: A Journey from Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist to Celebrated Nature Photographer

Publisher's Description

It’s not often that a career in photography makes as many twists and turns as it has for Jack Dykinga. Early in Jack’s career as a photojournalist he won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography. He then worked as a photo editor and later became a wilderness guide. Today, Jack’s work as a landscape photographer is world-renowned.

After a near-death experience, Jack formed a new perspective that provided a framework for self examination and a deeper look into why images resonate with a photographer’s feelings. As the images displayed in this book progress through the distinct periods in Jack’s life, he describes the influences and events that shaped his changing style and his design sense. With an intense sense of gratitude, he explains the forces that caused his focus to evolve, and he describes the often-subtle changes that define his work.

A virtual “who’s who” of editors, writers, and photographers have influenced Jack’s photographic journey, which has spanned 50 years. His amassed images form a body of work that is diverse and profound. From huddled figures in mental institutions to sweeping landscapes, his images span an enormous emotional range from disturbing to celebratory to sublime. They are touchstones in a life of photography.

Publisher: Rocky Nook

Size: 10 x 10"

216 pages

Jack Dykinga
It’s not often that a career in photography makes as many twists and turns as it has for Jack Dykinga. Early in Jack’s career as a photojournalist he won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography. He then worked as a photo editor and later became a wilderness guide. Today, Jack’s work as a landscape photographer is world-renowned.
£31.49

Picture of Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer

Publisher's Description

The definitive biography of the beguiling Diane Arbus, one of the most influential and important photographers of the twentieth century, a brilliant and absorbing exposition that links the extraordinary arc of her life to her iconic photographs

Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer brings into focus with vividness and immediacy one of the great American artists of the twentieth century. Arbus comes startlingly to life on these pages, a strong-minded child of disconcerting originality who grew into a formidable photographer of unflinching courage. Arbus forged an intimacy with her subjects that has inspired generations of artists. Arresting, unsettling, and poignant, her photographs stick in our minds. Why did these people fascinate her? And what was it about her that captivated them?
It is impossible to understand the transfixing power of Arbus’s photographs without exploring her life. Lubow draws on exclusive interviews with Arbus’s friends, lovers, and colleagues; on previously unknown letters; and on his own profound critical insights into photography to explore Arbus’s unique perspective and to reveal important aspects of her life that were previously unknown or unsubstantiated. He deftly traces Arbus’s development from a wealthy, sexually precocious free spirit into first, a successful New York fashion photographer and then, a singular artist who coaxed secrets from her subjects. Lubow reveals that Arbus’s profound need not only to see her subjects but to be seen by them drove her to forge unusually close bonds with these people, helping her discover the fantasies, pain, and heroism within each of them, and leading her to create a new kind of photographic portraiture charged with an unnerving complicity between the subject and the viewer.
Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer brushes aside the clichés that have long surrounded Arbus and her work. It is a magnificently absorbing biography of this unique, hugely influential artist.

“In a fast-moving narrative style that reads like an eyewitness account, Lubow gets inside both the person and the persona. This book both analyzes and contributes to the notoriety and fascination with one of the most complicated figures in the history of photography.” — Jeff Wall

“Lubow turned a routine magazine assignment for the New York Times into the defining biography of photographer Diane Arbus . . . Lubow provides not only a comprehensive assessment of her groundbreaking work but, perhaps more significantly, a revealing documentary of Arbus’s often-tortured life.” — Publishers Weekly

ISBN: 9780062234322

Publisher: Harper Collins

Size: 6 x 9"

752 pages

Arthur Lubow
The definitive biography of the beguiling Diane Arbus, one of the most influential and important photographers of the twentieth century, a brilliant and absorbing exposition that links the extraordinary arc of her life to her iconic photographs
£30.00

Picture of Bruce Davidson

Publisher's Description

The second in an acclaimed series of illustrated biographies of Magnum photographers, this volume chronicles the life and work of Bruce Davidson, a truly American artist, iconoclast, and humanist.

Bruce Davidson began his love affair with photography at age ten. The son of a hardworking divorced mother, he was a loner who disliked school and had difficulty conforming to the world around him. His camera released him from the boundaries of his youth and opened the doors to a lifetime’s work. Vicki Goldberg's authoritative text explores the wide range of his vision and technique, and reveals how his work has played a critical role in twentieth-century photography. This lushly illustrated text includes images from his most iconic series such as "Brooklyn Gang", "East 100th Street", "Subway", and "Time of Change: Civil Rights Photographs", along with never-before seen archival material from Davidson’s private archive. Beautifully reproduced, these pictures reveal Davidson’s curiosity about, and empathy for, his subjects. Whether he is documenting circuses, gangs, East Harlem tenements, Jewish cafeterias, Welsh miners, or Central Park, Davidson imbues his work with an eye for narrative. His pictures tell stories—and he lets them speak for themselves. The result is a comprehensive and elegantly presented portrait of an artist’s life and work.

Publisher: Prestel

Size: 235 x 273 mm

192 pages, 123 b/w illustrations

Vicki Goldberg
The second in an acclaimed series of illustrated biographies of Magnum photographers, this volume chronicles the life and work of Bruce Davidson, a truly American artist, iconoclast, and humanist.
£31.50

Picture of Luigi Ghirri: The Complete Essays 1973–1991

Publisher's Description

Luigi Ghirri (1942–1992) started writing about photography from the moment he became a photographer: for his own publications, for Italian magazines and newspapers, as well as private reflections committed to paper, where his thoughts might settle and then depart in new directions.

Published for the first time in English, The Complete Essays, 1973–1991 comprises sixty-eight texts, mostly only one or two pages long. The exercise of writing always accompanied Ghirri’s photographic practice, and he approached the same subjects at the core of his photographs, only distilled through a different medium – themes of identity, time, memory, vision, representation, and sense of place. At the same time, as a voracious reader with a particular taste for the eclectic, Ghirri also reaches outwards from his own practice, as he considers the work of Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Walker Evans, William Eggleston, Robert Adams and John Gossage, weaving in references to musicians, writers and painters alike. As themes and ideas overlap, the compilation of texts create a sort of dialectic chamber of curiosities that includes Gulliver, Van Gogh’s yellow house, Aldo Rossi’s pale pink and blue architecture, Cézanne, Morandi’s studio, Mallarmé, the fireworks above Trani Cathedral and the multicoloured lights on Ponza, neo-realist films, Blade Runner, lots of music (Bob Dylan, Lucio Dalla, Prince, Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis), Francis Bacon, Schopenhauer, McLuhan’s global village, Pessoa, poetry. Together, the essays offer an unintentional yet comprehensive treatise on the history and theory of photography, and above all, they constitute a special form of autobiography.

Born in Scandiano in 1942, Luigi Ghirri spent his working life in the Emilia Romagna region, where he produced one of the most open and layered bodies of work in the history of photography. He was published and exhibited extensively both in Italy and internationally and was at the height of his career at the time of his death in 1992. His first book, Kodachrome (1978), an avant-garde manifesto for the medium of photography and a landmark in his own remarkable oeuvre, was re-published by MACK in 2012.

Publisher: Mack

Size: 140 x 228 mm

240 pages, 50 colour plates

65,000 words

Luigi Ghirri
Published for the first time in English, The Complete Essays, 1973–1991 comprises sixty-eight texts, mostly only one or two pages long.
£15.00

Picture of Hold Still

Publisher's Description

A revealing and beautifully written memoir and family history from acclaimed photographer Sally Mann.

In this groundbreaking book, a unique interplay of narrative and image, Mann's preoccupation with family, race, mortality, and the storied landscape of the American South are revealed as almost genetically predetermined, written into her DNA by the family history that precedes her.

Sorting through boxes of family papers and yellowed photographs she finds more than she bargained for: "deceit and scandal, alcohol, domestic abuse, car crashes, bogeymen, clandestine affairs, dearly loved and disputed family land . . . racial complications, vast sums of money made and lost, the return of the prodigal son, and maybe even bloody murder."

In lyrical prose and startlingly revealing photographs, she crafts a totally original form of personal history that has the page-turning drama of a great novel but is firmly rooted in the fertile soil of her own life.

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

Size: 6" x 9 1/4"

496 pages

Sally Mann
A revealing and beautifully written memoir and family history from acclaimed photographer Sally Mann.
£23.95

Picture of From my land to the Planet

Publisher's Description

Sebastião Salgado's photographs have been shown around the world. In From my land to the Planet the photographer tells us the story of his most famous reportages: the black and white portraits of unknown men and women, workers or refugees, and more recently his Genesis project aimed at the conservation of the most beautiful places of our planet. With a kindness and a disarming simplicity, Salgado rebuilds its path, exposes his beliefs, makes us sharers of his emotions. It turns out that his talent as a storyteller and the authenticity of a man who knows how to combine activism and professionalism, talent and generosity. Inside the book there are fascinating stories of Africa, Brazil, the Americas, Mozambique and Rwanda, and then again the birth of the Instituto Terra, of Genesis project, of the agency Magnum Photos until Amazonas Images.

“I very much like to work on long-term projects...There is time for the photographer and the people in front of the camera to understand each other. There is time to go to a place and understand what is happening there. ...When you spend more time on a project, you learn to understand your subjects. There comes a time when it is not you who is taking the pictures. Something special happens between the photographer and the people he is photographing. He realizes that they are giving the pictures to him. With my background as an economist, sociologist, and anthropologist my photograpy can be nothing but social. Everything in my background, my upbrising, my education, my focus on sociology, anthropology, and geopolitics—has speeded into my photography. Photography, for me, is continuity.” Sebastião Salgado

Publisher: Contrasto

Size: 160 x 224 mm

160 pages, 40 black and white photographs

Sebastião Salgado
In From my land to the Planet the photographer tells us the story of his most famous reportages: the black and white portraits of unknown men and women, workers or refugees, and more recently his Genesis project aimed at the conservation of the most beautiful places of our planet.
£15.26

Picture of Capturing the Light

Publisher's Description

An intimate look at the journeys of two men—a gentleman scientist and a visionary artist—as they struggled to capture the world around them, and in the process invented modern photography

During the 1830s, in an atmosphere of  intense scientific enquiry fostered by the industrial revolution, two quite different men—one in France, one in England—developed  their own dramatically different photographic processes in total ignorance of each other's work. These two lone geniuses—Henry Fox Talbot in the seclusion of his English country estate at Lacock Abbey and Louis Daguerre in the heart of post-revolutionary Paris—through diligence, disappointment and sheer hard work overcame extraordinary odds to achieve the one thing man had for centuries been trying to do—to solve the ancient puzzle of how to capture the light and in so doing make nature 'paint its own portrait'.  With the creation of their two radically different processes—the Daguerreotype and the Talbotype—these two giants of early photography  changed the world and how we see it.

Drawing on a wide range of original, contemporary sources and featuring plates in colour, sepia and black and white, many of them rare or previously unseen,Capturing the Light by Roger Watson and Helen Rappaport charts an extraordinary  tale of genius, rivalry and human resourcefulness in the quest to produce the world's first photograph.

Publisher: St Martin's Press

Size: 6 1/8 x 9 1/4"

320 pages, Plus two 8-page color photograph inserts

Roger Watson and Helen Rappaport
An intimate look at the journeys of two men—a gentleman scientist (Talbot) and a visionary artist (Daguerre)—as they struggled to capture the world around them, and in the process invented modern photography.
£19.75

Picture of Josef Sudek: The legacy of a deeper vision

Publisher's Description

The photographer Josef Sudek stands for outstanding artistry and technical virtuosity - unparalleled among his contemporaries, particularly the representation of the light in his photographs. This book invites you to a multi-layered, autobiographical journey through art, life and the indomitable spirit of this artist.

Josef Sudek (1896 -1976) was confronted early in his career with Cubism and Surrealism, the Czech avant-garde and other art forms prevalent in the 1920s and 1930s. But the artist was looking for a unique form of artistic expression. He quickly gave his photographs almost contemplative quality and turned his observations into visual poetry of particular timelessness. The catalog assembled with contributions from the photography historian and curator Antonin Dufek, the editor of the magazine Canadian Art, Richard Rhodes, the photographer Geoffrey James and the curator of photography at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Maia-Mari Sutnik, the most important authors on Sudek's work. In addition, the volume contains excerpts from John Banville's Prague Pictures: Portraits of a City and a chronology of Sudek's life and work, compiled by art historian Anna Ferova.

See sample images here.

Publisher: Hirmer Verlag

Size: 312 x 264 mm

256 pages

Josef Sudek
This book invites you to a multi-layered, autobiographical journey through art, life and the indomitable spirit of Josef Sudek.
£40.50

Picture of Gerda Taro

Gerda Taro (19101937) was the first woman photojournalist to photograph in the heat of battle. Taro was the lover and photographic partner of famed photojournalist Robert Capa and, as his manager, is often credited for launching Capas career. She and Capa covered much of the Spanish Civil War side by side. Taro was killed in July 1937, while photographing a crucial battle near Madrid. ICP holds what is by far the worlds largest collection of Taros work, including approximately 200 prints as well as original negatives. Organized chronologically, this exhibition will include vintage and modern prints, and magazine layouts using Taros work. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue, the first major collection of Taros work ever published.

Gerda Taro

Gerda Taro (19101937) was the first woman photojournalist to photograph in the heat of battle. Taro was the lover and photographic partner of famed photojournalist Robert Capa and, as his manager, is often credited for launching Capas career. She and Capa covered much of the Spanish Civil War side by side. Taro was killed in July 1937, while photographing a crucial battle near Madrid. ICP holds what is by far the worlds largest collection of Taros work, including approximately 200 prints as well as original negatives. Organized chronologically, this exhibition will include vintage and modern prints, and magazine layouts using Taros work. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue, the first major collection of Taros work ever published.

£18.00

Picture of Diane Arbus - A Chronology
Publisher's Description
Diane Arbus: A Chronology is the closest thing possible to reading a contemporaneous diary by one of the most daring, influential, and controversial artists of the twentieth century. Drawn primarily from Arbus’s extensive correspondence with friends, family, and colleagues; personal notebooks; and other unpublished writings, this beautifully produced volume exposes the private thoughts and motivations of an artist whose astonishing vision derived from the courage to see things as they are and the grace to permit them simply to be. Further rounding out Arbus’s life and work are exhaustively researched footnotes that amplify the entire Chronology. A section at the end of the book provides biographies for fifty-five personalities, family members, friends, and colleagues, from Marvin Israel and Lisette Model to Weegee and August Sander.

Describing the Chronology in Art in America, Leo Rubinfien noted that “Arbus…wrote as well as she photographed, and her letters, where she heard each nuance of her words, were gifts to the people who received them. Once one has been introduced to it, the beauty of her spirit permanently changes and deepens one’s understanding of her pictures…”

The texts in Diane Arbus: A Chronology originally appeared in Diane Arbus Revelations. This volume makes this invaluable text available in an accessible, paperback volume for the very first time.

You can view images from this book on the Aperture website.

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 8" x 6 1/2"
192 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 19.95
Diane Arbus
Publisher's Description
Diane Arbus: A Chronology is the closest thing possible to reading a contemporaneous diary by one of the most daring, influential, and controversial artists of the twentieth century. Drawn primarily from Arbus’s extensive correspondence with friends, family, and colleagues; personal notebooks; and other unpublished writings, this beautifully produced volume exposes the private thoughts and motivations of an artist whose astonishing vision derived from the courage to see things as they are and the grace to permit them simply to be. Further rounding out Arbus’s life and work are exhaustively researched footnotes that amplify the entire Chronology. A section at the end of the book provides biographies for fifty-five personalities, family members, friends, and colleagues, from Marvin Israel and Lisette Model to Weegee and August Sander.

Describing the Chronology in Art in America, Leo Rubinfien noted that “Arbus…wrote as well as she photographed, and her letters, where she heard each nuance of her words, were gifts to the people who received them. Once one has been introduced to it, the beauty of her spirit permanently changes and deepens one’s understanding of her pictures…”

The texts in Diane Arbus: A Chronology originally appeared in Diane Arbus Revelations. This volume makes this invaluable text available in an accessible, paperback volume for the very first time.

You can view images from this book on the Aperture website.

Publisher: Aperture
Size: 8" x 6 1/2"
192 pages

Publisher's Price: £ 19.95
£17.96

Picture of Frida Kahlo: Her Photos
Publisher's Description
When Frida Kahlo died in 1954, her husband Diego Rivera asked the poet Carlos Pellicer to turn her family home, the fabled Blue House, into a museum. Pellicer selected some paintings, drawings, photographs, books and ceramics, maintaining the space just as Kahlo and Rivera had arranged it to live and work in. The rest of the objects, clothing, documents, drawings and letters, as well as over 6,000 photographs collected by Kahlo over the course of her life, were put away in bathrooms that had been converted into storerooms. This incredible trove remained hidden for more than half a century, until, just a few years ago, these storerooms and wardrobes were opened up. Kahlo's photograph collection was a major revelation among these finds, a testimony to the tastes and interests of the famous couple, not only through the images themselves but also through the telling annotations inscribed upon them. Photography had always been a part of Kahlo's life—her father Guillermo Kahlo was one of the great Mexican photographers at the beginning of the twentieth century—and her collection constitutes a roll call of great photographers: Man Ray, Brassaï, Martin Munkacsi, Pierre Verger, George Hurrel, Tina Modotti, Edward Weston, Manuel and Lola Álvarez Bravo, Gisèle Freund and many others, including Kahlo herself. It is likely that many of the unattributed photographs in the collection were taken by her, though we can only be sure of the few that she decided to sign in 1929. Frida Kahlo: Her Photos allows us to speculate about Kahlo's and Rivera's likes and dislikes, and to document their family origins; it supplies a thrilling and hugely significant addition to our knowledge of Kahlo's life and work.

You can view images from this book on the ART BOOK website.

Publisher: RM
Size: 6.75 x .59"
524 pages, 460 duotone

Publisher's Price: £ 30.00
Edited by Pablo Ortiz Monasterio
Publisher's Description
When Frida Kahlo died in 1954, her husband Diego Rivera asked the poet Carlos Pellicer to turn her family home, the fabled Blue House, into a museum. Pellicer selected some paintings, drawings, photographs, books and ceramics, maintaining the space just as Kahlo and Rivera had arranged it to live and work in. The rest of the objects, clothing, documents, drawings and letters, as well as over 6,000 photographs collected by Kahlo over the course of her life, were put away in bathrooms that had been converted into storerooms. This incredible trove remained hidden for more than half a century, until, just a few years ago, these storerooms and wardrobes were opened up. Kahlo's photograph collection was a major revelation among these finds, a testimony to the tastes and interests of the famous couple, not only through the images themselves but also through the telling annotations inscribed upon them. Photography had always been a part of Kahlo's life—her father Guillermo Kahlo was one of the great Mexican photographers at the beginning of the twentieth century—and her collection constitutes a roll call of great photographers: Man Ray, Brassaï, Martin Munkacsi, Pierre Verger, George Hurrel, Tina Modotti, Edward Weston, Manuel and Lola Álvarez Bravo, Gisèle Freund and many others, including Kahlo herself. It is likely that many of the unattributed photographs in the collection were taken by her, though we can only be sure of the few that she decided to sign in 1929. Frida Kahlo: Her Photos allows us to speculate about Kahlo's and Rivera's likes and dislikes, and to document their family origins; it supplies a thrilling and hugely significant addition to our knowledge of Kahlo's life and work.

You can view images from this book on the ART BOOK website.

Publisher: RM
Size: 6.75 x .59"
524 pages, 460 duotone

Publisher's Price: £ 30.00
£27.00

Picture of Alfred Stieglitz - A Legacy of Light
Publisher's Description
In Stieglitz: A Beginning Light, Katherine Hoffman presented an account of the early years of the career of Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) and of his European roots. Now, she offers a compelling portrait of his life and art from 1915 to 1946, focusing on his American works, issues of identity, and the rise of modernism in America.

Hoffman explores Stieglitz's roles as photographer, editor, writer, and gallery director; how they intersected with his personal life — including his marriage to artist Georgia O'Keeffe — and his place in the cultural milieu of the 20th century. Excerpts from previously unpublished correspondence between Stieglitz and O'Keeffe reveal the fervor and complexity of their relationship as well as his passion for photography and modern art and his ongoing struggle to have photography recognized as an established artistic medium. These letters, along with his work as an editor and writer of short articles, illuminate Stieglitz's literary side, thus giving a new perspective on his total oeuvre.

Generously illustrated with 300 images, this intriguing, beautifully written book separates the photographer's true personality from the myths surrounding him and highlights his lasting legacy: the works he left behind.

Publisher: Yale University Press
Size: 8 1/2 x 10 1/2"
400 pages, 200 b/w + 80 colour illustrations

Publisher's Price: £ 35.00
Katherine Hoffman
Publisher's Description
In Stieglitz: A Beginning Light, Katherine Hoffman presented an account of the early years of the career of Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) and of his European roots. Now, she offers a compelling portrait of his life and art from 1915 to 1946, focusing on his American works, issues of identity, and the rise of modernism in America.

Hoffman explores Stieglitz's roles as photographer, editor, writer, and gallery director; how they intersected with his personal life — including his marriage to artist Georgia O'Keeffe — and his place in the cultural milieu of the 20th century. Excerpts from previously unpublished correspondence between Stieglitz and O'Keeffe reveal the fervor and complexity of their relationship as well as his passion for photography and modern art and his ongoing struggle to have photography recognized as an established artistic medium. These letters, along with his work as an editor and writer of short articles, illuminate Stieglitz's literary side, thus giving a new perspective on his total oeuvre.

Generously illustrated with 300 images, this intriguing, beautifully written book separates the photographer's true personality from the myths surrounding him and highlights his lasting legacy: the works he left behind.

Publisher: Yale University Press
Size: 8 1/2 x 10 1/2"
400 pages, 200 b/w + 80 colour illustrations

Publisher's Price: £ 35.00
£31.50

Picture of Andreas Feininger - A Photographer's Life 1906-1999
Publisher's Description
Andreas Feininger (1906–1999) spent his entire adult life exploring the artistic and technical possibilities and limitations of photography. In terms of technique, he was the expert among experts. Artistically, the austere black-and-white lines and simplicity of his work brought him recognition the world over, and his images have long since gone down in the annals of photography.

This biography describes his life behind and beside the camera. The oldest son of painter Lyonel Feininger, beginning with his childhood, the book moves through his years at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau and the period he spent as an émigré in Paris and Stockholm to his years in the United States, where he worked as a photojournalist and photographer. Feininger contributed to Life magazine for twenty years and published countless textbooks and volumes of photographs—photography was his life.

Publisher: Hatje Cantz
Size: 170 x 230 mm
192 pages, 129 illustrations in duotone

Publisher's Price: £26.99
Andreas Feininger
Publisher's Description
Andreas Feininger (1906–1999) spent his entire adult life exploring the artistic and technical possibilities and limitations of photography. In terms of technique, he was the expert among experts. Artistically, the austere black-and-white lines and simplicity of his work brought him recognition the world over, and his images have long since gone down in the annals of photography.

This biography describes his life behind and beside the camera. The oldest son of painter Lyonel Feininger, beginning with his childhood, the book moves through his years at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau and the period he spent as an émigré in Paris and Stockholm to his years in the United States, where he worked as a photojournalist and photographer. Feininger contributed to Life magazine for twenty years and published countless textbooks and volumes of photographs—photography was his life.

Publisher: Hatje Cantz
Size: 170 x 230 mm
192 pages, 129 illustrations in duotone

Publisher's Price: £26.99
£24.29

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